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13

You never want to stop yourself with the crampons because they are liable to catch, flip you over, and at best, put you in a worse situation than before, and at worst, break your legs. Instead you want to first stop yourself using the pick of the ice axe, with your crampons raised above the ice. You can use your knees as an additional brake. The way you do ...


12

First - Assess the situation and determine if an active rescue is possible and safe. Many would be rescuers are caught or killed in follow up avalanches because they acted without assessing the surrounding conditions. Assuming you have equipment to assist in the rescue follow the guidelines below. Yell to alert your partners and other people that may be ...


11

Types of satellite-based emergency beacons Personal Locator Beacons Personal Locator Beacons (or PLBs) have one and only one purpose: to send your location to emergency responders, indicating that you need some kind of urgent help. They use a satellite network operated by government agencies worldwide, and send your distress call directly to a ...


9

It is never advisable to use any safety gear that you do not know the history of. Doesn't matter if it is legit, what matters is the history of the rope. If it's a club rope for climbing then there should be a record of usage and falls. If no record exists, then it is unknown whether the rope has taken any significant falls or if it is still safe to use. ...


7

To be honest, the most important thing a Rescue Team needs to have is plenty of manpower (and womanpower!) with training and experience (speaking as a member of a UK Cave Rescue Team).


7

Although @ReverendGonzo gave a nice answer I want to start a little debate. There is no explicit answer to this question. Different alpine clubs have different opinions and even different mountain guides in one organization. That being said, I think the process described by @ReverendGonzo (which I will call default process) is very common and also the ...


5

Below is the bare minimum list of gear I would require anyone on my team to carry during and rescue operation. It does not include any of the numerous pieces of rope equipment that members of the rope team would cary in addition to the basic equipment ( only specific team members that have completed extensive training are qualified to be involved in any of ...


4

I did a bit of research and it appears that NFPA 1983 is a standard for ropes used in technical rescue, similar to UIAA ratings for climbing ropes. The tag you found seems to imply that this rope meets the specifications of the 2001 edition of NFPA standard 1983 for a life safety rope. I couldn't find a free copy of the 2001 standard, but in the 2012 edition ...


4

The Wikipedia article has a lot of detail: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distress_radiobeacon. There's no fee. In the USA, the response comes from government agencies such as the Coast Guard. It does need to be registered, but registration is free and easy online. If you use it when there's not an emergency, you could be fined.


3

My personal experience does not involve a satellite communication device, but may still shed some light on response time. I was day hiking with a small group in a remote canyon in a U.S. Wilderness Area, off-trail, several miles from any road and a number of miles further to any residences. One member of my group fell and broke her hip. Another member hiked ...



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