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24

I've never taken an unpowered, hand-built raft out onto a commercial river, but I do have experience under sail and under power on the Columbia River in the United States. What I know about maritime law, tradition and etiquette might not be exactly what they expect in Europe, but I imagine the principles are much the same. In most cases, a craft without a ...


21

It depends on how many crossings. If very few, I do them barefoot and change. If there are a lot of crossings in a short distance I have shoes that I just wear for the entire hike. I'll cover both. General Rules Don't use rocks if you can avoid it. Stand on the bottom of the river. Just don't try rock hopping - you're asking for serious injury. (...


20

First off, weigh up whether it's worth crossing said river. I know this question is about if you "have" to cross it, but bear in mind that falling in is a real danger and if you do, hypothermia can onset very quickly and be deadly. It depends on the situation - if we're talking about a shallow, wade-able body of water that's not much more than a stream I'd ...


17

It depends very much on the specific geography. But the idea of "whirlpools" that suck down people or entire ships, never to be seen again (which I suspect is what fascinates you) is largely a myth. The dangers aren't any different (and typically much smaller) than those posed by whitewater rapids in rivers. Specific dangers are: Being knocked against ...


14

This is highly dependent on the type of water as well as the location, but I'll summarise a few things to be aware of. In many locations most of these dangers won't factor in, but they're useful things to bear in mind if you're trying to assess the danger of a particular body of water. I'll focus on the sea here - for other things such as rivers similar ...


13

The traditional tip is to cross at the widest point, where the river has the least power and is spread over a wider area. Often this is the most shallow point also. You will cross while facing upstream, but you can move slightly downstream to use some of the force of the current rather than working against it. If you are a group, lock arms and move in a line ...


13

There is one more important technique you can use that I was taught in New Zealand, where you have to cross rivers all the time. If you have a group of people (at least 3), you can greatly enhance safety by forming a chain in the following way: Position the strongest person upstream, the second-strongest person downstream and the weakest person in the ...


12

With a large enough canoe, you can simply put the bike in the canoe, albeit somewhat precariously. What's more common though is for people to bike their canoe to an input, lock up the bike on shore, then return to it. A good alternative is a folding bike. They're not as efficient to ride for long distances, but can easily be fit inside a canoe. For ...


12

The good news Navigating the Danube with a raft is certainly possible, and has been done: for instance, Flossbusters are a group of Dresdners who went all the way from Bertoldsheim to the Black Sea on a home-built raft over the course of five summers. Their craft, the good ship Dresden, looks quite similar to what you envisage: Source: flossbusters.de ...


11

They sell fiberglass repair kits at most boating stores which are made for this exact sort of repair. It includes a fiber glass cloth which you put over the damaged area, as well as a resin / hardening agent to hold the patch in place. Any kit you buy should have instructions for applying the patch in it.


11

I have a 17.5' Clipper Tripper, and I live in Southern Alberta, which means I sometimes get caught on the water in Chinook winds (90km gusts), I know what it feels like to get tossed around in the wind like a wind sock. Unless you have a heavy load to keep the bow down, or someone in the bow that can help you out, your best option is to paddle the canoe ...


10

If you want to remain stationary, you need a solid anchor, and the best option is going to be to attach to a tree or something that you can securely fix to on the bank. Not knowing that river, I can't say whether that would work or not, so I'll discuss anchoring to the bottom. This is the same procedure for anchoring in a tide or a river, except in a river ...


10

Thank you to nhinkle who posted the answer that showed it is possible to put a bike in an canoe. I have something over 100 miles of canoeing with a bike and a dolly in my canoe now. I started with the bike and the dolly laying in the bottom of the canoe. But it took up lots of floor space and everything tended to get tangled together. I put the dolly in ...


10

The whole thing comes down to weight, if your setup can displace more than its weight then it will float, those jeeps were made to be very light. You could be in the situation where your "wrapped car" could float but its so deep in the water you wont be able to move it anywhere (or you would need an huge canvas and a mean to hold it in deep water as much as ...


9

OK, this isn't a hypothetical question. You will have to ford numerous rivers fed directly from glaciers if you hike in the Swedish mountains. These are extremely cold, very rapid streams with rocks everywhere. Some basic advice is: Use a rod or stick as support. You should always lean on two points - two legs or one leg and the rod. Never have your hip ...


9

I'm always using sandals. There are good trekking sandals with profiled soles that gives you adhesion not much worse than trekking shoes. Of course, they are not as much stabile, but you have no problem with drying them. When the water is not higher then the knees, the current is not strong enough to be dangerous for you, of course you must always be very ...


9

I would suggest not sleeping on the boat. Apart from the safety issues this will bring up - the boat could slowly lose air, or could start drifting away, the water could rise, ... - it will not protect you against wind or rain. So in any case, the least I'd suggest for you to get is a good tarp or a rain-proof bivouac sleeping bag. A tent is obviously even ...


8

I will not recommend crossing if the bridge is only composed of frozen snow because snow does not support a lot of weight. You should check the following: The ice should be at least 15 cm thick (be careful to differentiate the frozen snow from the clear ice, the 15 cm applies only to clear ice) The bridge should not contain any water on it (sign of melting ...


8

I have a couple of extra points that were always relevant for us as kids growing up in an extremely tidal area (peaking at 16knots - 30mph!): Between islands, tidal races are usually predictable, and the local tide chart will let you know when slack tide (either high or low) is - these will be relatively safe times to swim. Halfway between these times the ...


8

There is not a definitive guide for all locks, however most of the major locks in the US are run by the US Army Corps of Engineers, and they do not charge recreational boaters to pass through them. To my knowledge, all locks on the Upper Mississippi are accessible via paddling. As for the Ohio river, you can try calling McAlpine lock and dam, and they'll be ...


8

I've owned pairs of both Keen and Ecco sandals, and have been quite happy with both. They each have solid leather construction with comfortable padding on the inside, and they tend to hold up well. The sandals are cut so that water flows out of them quickly. The down side is that this allows gravel and sand into the sandals as well. If you're in the ...


7

Everybody's method is going to be somewhat different, because they're using different footwear and other equipment (such as poles vs no poles). Plan ahead and get information on what water levels are likely to be like given the time of year and the amount of snow this year. If a certain hike is likely to be impossible to complete safely, you want to know ...


7

USGS: http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/index.php?r=us&id=ww_current National Weather Service Map: http://water.weather.gov/ahps2/index.php?wfo=ffc This is an easy to read table for GA, but I can't figure out how to navigate to other states on their site: http://www.srh.noaa.gov/ffc/html/rva.php More NOAA for the Colorado Basin: http://www.cbrfc.noaa.gov/ ...


7

During the trip: duct tape. It's strong and flexible and it's easy to carry 3 or 4 feet with you. I've used it to repair a yoke in the middle of nowhere. Once you're home: a little fiberglass cloth and some epoxy resin. Or if it's more a deep scratch than a gouge, just the resin.


7

I did a lot of swimming in NW Ontario when I was a kid, and I've spent more time swimming in lakes and rivers than I have in swimming pools. I find the phrasing of this question curious, because I've never heard any one use the words "wild swimming" nor have I ever considered swimming in a mountain lake or a river "wild". None the less, there are some ...


7

Wile the faint of heart might find this answer disturbing, Yes it is fine to sleep on an inflatable boat, if it is durable thick rubber like a Zodiak. I have done so many times, and find it quite relaxing even on the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers. These after all are life raft level construction. You are actually safer in a boat on the water than in a tent,...


7

Ok to address your question: Can I use a plastic blue tarp to float my vehicle over water? Yes Limits and Considerations: WILL YOU FLOAT? First off I will describe the physics of the floating car. The force of buoyancy acting on your car must be greater than the force of gravity pulling it down. The equation for buoyancy is this . Where Fb is the force ...


7

I guess the answer really is It depends As a general purpose solution I normally bring sturdy trekking/hiking sandals on my trips. Something like the models from Teva for example (many pictures on Google). I specifically look for models with have sturdy rubber soles with good profiles, and which come with velcro straps that I can fasten/adjust quickly and ...


7

As bon says in the comments, the most likely explanation is that the vultures and eagle were fighting over a carcass. The answer to your question "do eagles eat carrion?" is an emphatic yes: Unlike some other eagle species, bald eagles rarely take on evasive or dangerous prey on their own... They obtain much of their food as carrion or via a practice ...


7

According to Chris Ralph from mindlab, you should go for these signs: Color Changes: In many districts, acidic mineral solutions have bleached the area rocks to a lighter color. This can be an indicator of gold. Iron Staining & Gossans: Not all veins produce much quartz – gold bearing veins can consist of calcite or mostly sulfides – which ...



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