Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

I have a 17.5' Clipper Tripper, and I live in Southern Alberta, which means I sometimes get caught on the water in Chinook winds (90km gusts), I know what it feels like to get tossed around in the wind like a wind sock. Unless you have a heavy load to keep the bow down, or someone in the bow that can help you out, your best option is to paddle the canoe ...


7

I did a lot of swimming in NW Ontario when I was a kid, and I've spent more time swimming in lakes and rivers than I have in swimming pools. I find the phrasing of this question curious, because I've never heard any one use the words "wild swimming" nor have I ever considered swimming in a mountain lake or a river "wild". None the less, there are some ...


7

With a large enough canoe, you can simply put the bike in the canoe, albeit somewhat precariously. What's more common though is for people to bike their canoe to an input, lock up the bike on shore, then return to it. A good alternative is a folding bike. They're not as efficient to ride for long distances, but can easily be fit inside a canoe. For ...


6

There is not a definitive guide for all locks, however most of the major locks in the US are run by the US Army Corps of Engineers, and they do not charge recreational boaters to pass through them. To my knowledge, all locks on the Upper Mississippi are accessible via paddling. As for the Ohio river, you can try calling McAlpine lock and dam, and they'll be ...


4

In my experience, and from what I've heard from my whitewater canoeing friends, the best thing to do when handling a canoe in rough conditions is to kneel in the middle. This will a) bring the bow down b) bring your paddling position closer to the front, giving you more torque and precision in the direction of the bow c) lower your center of gravity, ...


4

The way to get started is to swim in areas that are marked as generally safe. These will typically be a sandy beach on the shores of a small lake. Provincial Parks generally have one of these with float lines marking the "safe" areas. As you can see, you're free to swim outside the lines if you want to. From http://www.ontarioparks.com/park/mikisew There ...


3

While I was crossing a stream, I was caught in one such but not so serious kind of a strainer. We call that strainers. These are formed when some obstacles get piled up and let a very narrow window for a person to pass through, but the water pass through it. Most of the strainers that you will (unfortunately) come across are likely to be formed by trees and ...


3

Oh....you don't. It would only be a matter of luck, physical strength and breath holding capacity...much emphasis on luck. I was once kayaking with my GF in Florida when I was in my early 20s and still very althletic ally capable. We kayaked through a tidal creek, and the tide was on its way out. We were drifting down stream. The river looks navigable for ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible