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9

You can buy specialist markers. They're designed to not impact the rope strength. Always use a sepecially designed rope marker as there is a comprehensive list of things to keep away from your rope and marker pen is one of them. The solvents can break down the nylon rope fibres making your rope potentially unsafe.


9

How about if you just take photos and post them on mountainproject or summitpost, along with verbal descriptions and UTM coordinates? Physically marking the starts of the routes is not compatible with a leave-no-trace ethic.


8

Yes, it is accepted practice to wash new Semi-Static rope (or Single Rope Technique/SRT Rope as it is known by cavers). There are two reasons why new ropes are best washed before use. Washing removes the anti-static lubricants used in manufacture and also shrinks the rope. This serves to compact the sheath and tighten it onto the core, stabilising ...


7

No matter what, try not to use the spray-paints at all. Considering that fact that most of the spraypaint and allied products contain solvents/chemicals like CCl4, Acetone, Methyl ethyl ketone, Ethylbenzene, Butoxyethanol and Xylene, etc. If I were you, I would not use it on my ropes for that matter. Dedicated Rope Markers : Spend some bucks and get a rope ...


7

Here are some features to keep in mind when buying climbing shoes once you're past the beginner phase: Downturned: Most beginner shoes are pretty flat, which are fine for mainly vertical walls. However, as you climb harder stuff on overhanging walls, it's helpful to have downturned shoes for maintaining a hook-like foot shape. This allows you to hook your ...


6

The mistakes I mention might be more common at lower grades than yours, here goes anyway: Too big steps. When I started climbing I tended to make massive steps, leaving out many good footholds in between. A more experienced friend taught me to avoid this by clipping a quickdraw between my climbing shoes on a toprope climb well within my ability; suddenly I ...


6

Muir Valley is a privately owned area, so presumably the coins are acceptable to the retired couple that owns it. Don't know about Ontario, but in the US (the Red River Gorge aside) most climbing areas are owned by federal or state governments who may likely have regulations against physically marking the starts of the routes (this is in addition to any ...


5

a common footwork mistake is not keeping it still! I see this all the time with people starting in bouldering, their footwork can be indecisive. You need to pick how and where you want to place your foot and do it. Don't keep moving it around, unless you plan to do this. Use the correct parts of your foot/shoe. You want to only use the outside/indside ...


5

Warning: Yer Gonna Die For this answer I'll discuss the devices and considerations specific to lead soloing, rather than describe a particular technique. Available Devices There are very few devices on the market for roped solo lead climbing. Rock Exotica's Soloist device used a camming mechanism similar to that of Petzl's GriGri. (As mentioned, the ...


5

You probably want your tool to have a longer extension, more like 100 cm. If this length bothers you, consider using an extendable bungee cord (e.g. 80 cm long, which you can stretch to 100 cm); twist it so it compacts itself when retracted. It might be possible to use a spiral/telephone cord, however it may be too bulky (I have seen it used for ice axes, ...


5

This is the first time I heard of this. But look at this PDF document: http://www.rockymountainrescue.org/outdoor_safety/AnalysisHappyHour1.pdf Apparently it is common practice to wind lengths of webbing onto spools and join lengths together (or "splice") with tape of some sort! From the above document: Photo of both sides of the "splice" after the ...


4

This, probably more than any issue in climbing, has generated more discussion, heated debates, and vitriol (especially on the internet) than any other issue in climbing. Both sides (lower vs. rappel) are equally ardent in their belief that their way is the One True Way. Unfortunately, both sides are wrong. My rule is simple: Climber's choice. You should ...


4

They shrink, apparently. See precautions here. http://www.bealplanet.com/notices/2007/index.php?id=302&lang=us Before first use, soak the rope and leave to dry slowly. It will shrink by about 5 %. Take this into account when calculating required lengths. And first use means just that : The very first time the rope is used.


3

Wild Country's nut tool has a spring leach with a tiny biner. See here Ive used it many times and the leash provides enough length for almost any position and the spring keeps it closer to you body.


3

When I am trad-climbing (actually generally when rock-climbing), I carry 60cm (shoulder length) and 120cm slings. Some 60cm slings set up as alpine draws, the rest over my shoulder. When setting up a belay station, 60cm slings tend to be too short. When using a double boolean as central point, that uses already most of the sling length. Further, when ...


3

There are rope manufacturers which mark their half ropes in the middle (as an option) or even produce them with different colors on both sides (Beal half ropes). For the reasons already mentioned, this is not standard. When abseiling you use both ropes so the middle is their connection. Still, when climbing alpine routes, I like to have the middle markers ...


3

I used fishermans thread, the sort used to bind the guide loops to the rod, as a whipping around the approriate point.


1

I use a figure-eight loop. Fairly easy to remove when you need to. Also gives the possibility to descend on one or two ends of the rope if the middle is brought to your anchor.


1

Does a best practices guide for climbing safely exist online? To learn safety you need a practical introduction by someone you're sure knows what they're talking about. Techniques can vary considerably between country and country and climbing techniques, e.g. it's common to use two half ropes in the UK. This is less common in other parts of the world. ...


1

Here are some resources I found: http://www.climbing.com/skill/rock-climbing-technique/ http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/stawamus/bp-guide-rock-route-dev.pdf http://www.indoorclimbing.com/Climbing_Technique.html The main reason people usually share best practices orally and in person is because the experienced climber can correct the ...


1

When establishing a first ascent on an "Inclined" route that does not have existing bolts with hangers you must use trad gear. Climb bottom up placing gear as you go. When Top roping you can stay close to the wall at a rest by placing a piece of gear and clipping the rope through then taking the gear out when you continue climbing. When rappelling you do ...


1

In addition to the other answers, a blog post by Andy Kirkpatrick (a leading proponent of the art of solo roped climbing) on his description of what he does, can be seen at http://www.andy-kirkpatrick.com/articles/view/rope_soloing_101_part_1



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