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8

The best way to lear how to place protections is to climb sport routes that are also suited to protection placement. Bring plenty of quickdraws (and of gear to place of course). Use the bolts, but place protections as if those were your only alternative up there. This will, as the very first and foremost thing, allow you to place plenty of them. The more, ...


7

I think that rope management at your harness (in both rock and ice climbing) is an extension of managing your rope while you're clipping into your pro. You carry different lengths of draws and slings so you can keep your rope as straight as possible to reduce drag and avoid popping out all your pro when you weight the rope. If you're climbing left of your ...


5

If your intending to top-rope with it, or unimaginably lead climb on it, then absolutely not... ever. Polypropylene not only has a super low melting point, but the fibres are a really large diameter, which means they are super susceptible to abrasion, i.e. your rope cutting. It lastly won't stretch when loaded, which is all around bad news in climbing! The ...


5

I usually carry 10 single-length slings and 2 doubles, which means I have 24 carabiners just for the draws. That's a lot of biners, which is of course why most people will use all wiregates for this. That's not to say that it's impossible to do otherwise. I imagine that people climbing in the 1970s would have used nylon slings and non-wiregate oval biners, ...


5

The simplest and most straight forward solution would be to connect yourself to a ground anchor. If you decide to do this while belaying a lead climber, you might want to let the rope slide a little when they fall, because you will loose the ability to provide a soft-catch by offsetting your body-weight.


4

Liam hinted at the method that was popular in the US while back, and probably still is: follow an experienced climber and clean their gear. You'll get to see actual placements & find out how hard or easily a piece of pro should come out. Aid climbing (with bounce testing) is a great way to learn too. And a great way to kill six hours going only 100 ...


4

In the UK trad climbing is the most popular form of outdoor rock climbing: there are sport routes but there are many many more trad routes, so many people (me included) actually trad climb before they sport climb (outdoors anyway). Instruction Obviously the best (and safest) way to learn is from someone more experienced than yourself. Three good options ...


3

A climbing rope, as in sport-climbing, is also known as a dynamic rope - it stretches when you fall. If you use polypropylene strips and fall 5 metres, even if they are strong enough not to break, the same force acts on your body as if you fell 5 metres onto solid ground. If this weren't a problem, climbers would all be using steel cable which is stronger ...


3

The difference is in the footwork, you back-step (what I always refer to as dropping your knee) while face climbing, but you can do it while you are laying back. A classic layback is like when you're climbing a crack while smearing your feet against the wall: Back-stepping is when you turn your hip into the wall so that you can get a toe or the outside ...


2

When you say short, I'm assuming your girlfriend is probably about my height which is 5'0. I boulder with my boyfriend who is about 6'. It is very frustrating watching a taller person walk in front of me and effortlessly reach a problem that I was just popping a vein to reach. As a shorter person, we will be forced to learn better technique, flexibility ...


2

I have seen this managed by having a runner on a low mounted hanger on the a joining climb. The resulting zigzag creates significant friction when the rope is loaded. An other way to manage this is to give the lead a dynamic belay in a fall - allowing a foot or so of rope to run though the belay, rather than just locking him off. Takes a bit of practice, ...


2

I find myself in agreement with the definitions listed on Climbing.com, so I have excerpted them here: Backstep n, v : To press your shoe’s external edge onto a foothold and drop the knee lightly, thus bringing the sole’s bottom-outside in contact with the rock and your hip in; often opposed against your other foot’s big toe, off which you resolutely ...


2

In an alpine environment there are many ways more likely that pro could fail than the gate opening - it not like sport or gym climbing where the anchor can be trusted, therefore, its wise to presume no individual anchor will hold, so if a gate did open and release the rope, the rest of the system will keep you safe. Carrying extra screw gates 'just in case' ...


2

First of all, there's no such thing being too safe, do whatever you feel makes you more secure as long as you can do it safely. As long as you place all of your pro properly, then you're unlikely to need to use lockers as intermediate protection between belays, but, all single gate, non-locking carabiners are susceptible to failing if back clipped, or ...


1

I do not know a definitive answer to this question, but as there is no other reply so far I will share what I know: When aiding in Yosemite a fellow climber used nuts for this purpose. You pull back the actual nut so that a wire loop extends behind it. This loop is places around the bolt shaft and can even be tightened. According to him this works fairly ...


1

Without some kind of ground anchor, you'll have to adapt your belay setup. First of all, the belayer doesn't have much choice about where to stand. Stand as close as you can to the first clipped draw, or you'll experience the dreaded smacked-into-the-wall-got-knocked-out-and-dropped-my-partner-effect. Second, a 50% difference isn't huge - lot's of ...


1

The biggest problem with a rope between you legs is what happens in a fall and the way the rope can cause all sorts of nasty outcomes when its between your legs and you don;t get a clean offload. In the gym you expect to fall, its something that happens regularly in gym climbing. Despite many falls being well controlled and expected, a rope between your legs ...


1

I would like to point out that in my line of work, we have retrievable ring and webbing anchors. They're called ring and rings. They probably wouldn't work in every circumstance, but i know that they would work in some. Just look up ring and ring friction savers.



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