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10

They don't have certification from the UIAA. As it states on the UIAA official website: The UIAA warns that the following brands may be using the UIAA name and/or Safety Label logo with out UIAA authorization: GM: The UIAA has received email from climbers in USA, Brazil, Finland and Australia that GM advertising gear with the registered UIAA ...


9

If it "easily came out of the rock," then it was at best useless and at worst a safety hazard, because of the possibility that someone might naively trust it. Removing it was a public service. Is it even wise to use pitons that you find in the rock? I use old fixed pins as pro all the time. If it's on a popular climbing route and has obviously been ...


7

There are many phrases that you will find concerning dry treatment of ropes, but they can all be easily related to your three categories: non-dry rope This rope has no treatment to repel water. Consequently it absorbs the most water and thus getting heavier. Wet ropes also loose some of their dynamic properties, so falls will get harder. As it is the ...


5

What are the differences? The different ropes basically differ by how they have been treated to handle water: non-dry ropes (although I've never seen that mentioned explicitly) have no special treatment at all, dry ropes have only the sheath, treated with some water-repellant, while dry core ones also have a treatment for the core. In both latter cases, the ...


4

Apparently Galen Rowell took a picture of a goat in the Cirque of the Unclimbables mantling past Galen's rappel anchors with a grade (US) of 5.9+.


3

Dry ropes and dry-core ropes are very similar. Basically they've been treated so they repel water (this does not make them water proof). "Wet" ropes have no treatment. What do these terms mean, and what are the conditions or types of climbing in which you would prefer one or the other? If you live anywhere where it rains and you plan to climb ...


3

I've used a Black Rapid (clone) shoulder strap and added a carabiner that I attach to my belt loop to keep it from swinging or banging against the rocks. I also connect the carabiner to the clip that attaches the camera to the strap so it holds the camera firmly at my waist.


3

The real safety issue is the condition of the harness webbing, not the type of buckle. Metal buckles don't soon wear out, whether you have to manually double-back the webbing belt or not. I don't believe the new buckles are mechanically safer, however accidents occurred simply because too many climbers forgot to double-back the webbing belt—enough so that ...


3

Wet ropes are heavier and provide less energy absorption, which is a big problem when you can't avoid wet conditions and you rely on your rope to protect you if you take a fall. Dry ropes have been impregnated with a fluoropolymer-based solution to prevent them from absorbing as much water as possible. Use of dry ropes is essential for alpine and ice ...


2

Generally you should be able to assess the quality of each anchor you're going to use by your self. Please read the article "Bolts: Check Your Safety!". Snippet: Make a constant effort to maintain awareness while climbing. When you get to a bolt, even if it has a fixed draw, as you clip the rope: Check your safety! It only takes a casual split second ...


2

When you say short, I'm assuming your girlfriend is probably about my height which is 5'0. I boulder with my boyfriend who is about 6'. It is very frustrating watching a taller person walk in front of me and effortlessly reach a problem that I was just popping a vein to reach. As a shorter person, we will be forced to learn better technique, flexibility ...


1

The products seem to be rip offs of Climb X gear. Here's the ice axe at a cheaper price. It would make more sense to buy the Climb X branded gear since the price difference is small.


1

I recently got the Mantona Elements, an interesting hybrid camera/trekking backpack: The lower part of the pack contains a small removable camera bag, while on top of it there's some space (not too much, though) for gear, food, clothes, etc. Alternatively, you can reconfigure it without the camera bag to use the entire space like a regular backpack. I'm ...



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