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13

The biggest difference in indoor climbing is that your routes are mapped out for you. It can be challenging to figure out the proper sequence, but it's much easier if you know where all the holds are right away. Another big factor is the abundance of large(ish) foothold. When setting in a gym (from 7 years of personal experience) even the tiniest jib can ...


12

As a disclaimer I'm 6'3" so this isn't from experience! As a tall climber you're correct, I have a lot of advantages. Reach can be very advantageous, especially on bouldering. In my experience the disadvantages of me being tall (therefore the advantages of being shorter!) are: I have a longer reach but I also have longer levers. This means I find certain ...


12

It's not as clear cut as for cycling. For cycling you have definite benefits, and of the 3 listed in the accepted answer on the cycling page: To prevent infection when crashing. To pull off bandages more painlessly after dressing a wound. Are really not an issue in climbing. Crashes in cycling often cause road rash, where dirt, grit, and hair are forced ...


8

I am not a very good climber as such, and I am 5'7" only. I think I am dwarf enough to put in my experiences here: As you rightly said, being short can be very frustrating when you don't get to access a specific hold. There are a few techniques that might help a short climber do amazingly well. Realize that you may not be able to do exactly the same ...


7

There are many different types of belays from above, e.g., you could be belaying for someone on third-class snow, with your dug-in crampons as part of your anchor. In that particular situation, you want to belay off of your body. Belaying off of your body has the disadvantage that if the climber takes a fall, you may be whipped around. A possible advantage ...


7

Are my fears of the anchor pieces popping out justified? Yes. This is an especially big concern when the climber has already placed the first piece of pro above the anchor, but falls before getting a second piece in. The fall factor can be large, and the direction of pull is up. If you don't have any gear that can hold against an upward pull, then your ...


7

There are definitely some "checklist" mnemonics for new climbers, but no standard set. Even among the ACMG & AMGA, every guide and instructor might use something slightly different, or not use any at all. Here is the one I teach new climbers personally. It's rather simple, but it seems to stick. Anchor Belayer Climber Anchor may simply be a check to ...


6

To start with, each situation will be different. E.g. if you have an overhang and your partner is hanging freely in space, you may need to handle things a bit differently. Lowering an unconscious leader is also dangerous, as lower-angle terrain can exacerbate their injuries, and getting them caught on an unseen ledge could introduce slack. Also, if you ...


6

Generally you want your skin to be quite tough (helps you hold onto small/sharp holds) but not too tough. If you skin get's too thick you get callouses, callouses are thick tough areas of skin. The problem being the skin around the callouse isn't as tough. This means the callouse can be pulled off, called a flapper: To maintain your skin you want to ...


4

Belaying Multi-pitch It's often recommended to belay off the harness (an "indirect" belay) when belaying the leader, and off the anchor (a "direct" belay) when belaying the follower. Use of an indirect belay for the leader reduces the force on the anchors, but does require consideration of how the belayer may be pulled in a fall. Use of a direct belay ...


4

If I interpret your question correctly, your problem is not so much about the climbing itself but more about the strategy, i.e. to identify where to rope up and where to remove the rope again. As you say, this can cost you lots of time if you recognize those points too late. This isn't something that you can train by climbing but more a thing that should be ...


4

(Update: I have now realized you were talking about belaying the leader, and not the second climber. I am updating my answer to take this into account.) What does "belay from the body" mean? According to your remark on the direction of the pool, I guess it means the rope doesn't pass through the anchor at all. This type of belaying seems not safe, ...


4

Interesting question. Here's some speculation, but I don't know if I'm right. There has been a clear tendency for climbing grades to inflate over time. You can really see this, for example, if you look at the climbs at Tahquitz Rock that were originally used to define the Yosemite Decimal System. For example, The Trough was the original definition of 5.0, ...


3

For the most important kind of care of your hands please read: Can a Finger Pulley injury be predicted / anticipated? For skin care specifically: I am not hard on my skin, climbing mostly on worn plastic these days and with the local crag being smooth basalt, but when my hands do get a bit overused or dried out I have found O'Keeffe's Working HandsĀ® ...


3

Although there is information on various websites and forums on self-rescue techniques, you really cannot learn enough to cope with a situation just by reading about it without a LOT of hands-on practice. To start with try and get help as much as you can - for instance shouting for help if there are any other climbers nearby. Get them to phone immediately ...


2

I think a climbing checklist is very important, but it's a fairly personal process. Of course in climbing you are part of a partnership and the person on the other end of the rope needs to be safe as well, but you can role-model and set a good standard. There are two ways that I teach pre-climb checking off, each of which can and should be customized to ...


2

I would suggest core strength is more the problem than leg strength, if you notice it specifically on overhangs. On a slab, your legs are doing most (or sometimes all) of the pushing, while minimal weight is on your hands for balance. As it gets steeper more of your weight will always be on your hands, but the stronger your core is the more you can keep ...


1

Not mentioned yet: shorter people probably have smaller hands, hence shorter fingers. Shorter fingers have more crimp strength. If you've ever climbed past a V1, you know that is very, very important.


1

This covers the details of taping a wrist after an injury: http://www.livestrong.com/article/219585-how-to-wrap-a-wrist-with-athletic-tape/ Basically you want to wrap strech bandage around the area first then add support to it using wide athletic/physio tape. If you still want to climb on it (if it's injured you may want to consider resting it to prevent ...



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