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18

Here are a couple Climb on your Skeleton Overhanging climbing is hard work and tiring. You need to reduce the stress on your muscles by letting your skeleton hold as much of your body weight as possible. Keep your arms straight and your muscles relaxed, don't try and hold yourself against the face. Pull only when you need to pull Use your shoulders/Twist ...


15

You will learn to fall through practice however there are some important points to consider: While climbing DO NOT let the rope wrap/run around/behind your leg(s), when you fall you will flip upside down! Therefore always know where the rope is! DO NOT Kick/Push off the wall, you will only pendulum back into it harder!!! Always know where on the route ...


15

The biggest difference in indoor climbing is that your routes are mapped out for you. It can be challenging to figure out the proper sequence, but it's much easier if you know where all the holds are right away. Another big factor is the abundance of large(ish) foothold. When setting in a gym (from 7 years of personal experience) even the tiniest jib can ...


14

With dedication you could learn to climb at a top-rope or bouldering climbing gym without professional instruction. The key skill there is belaying, and you could learn that from videos. However I would never recommend this route if good instruction is available. You may have difficulty separating Internet know-it-alls from experts, therefore you may not ...


13

The manufacturer of your rope says: Time in use : The potential lifetime of BEAL PPE in use is up to a maximum of 10 years. The lifetime of the rope in use must never exceed 10 years. The rope must be retired immediately: if it has held a major fall, approaching fall factor 2 if inspection reveals or even indicates damage to the ...


13

As a disclaimer I'm 6'3" so this isn't from experience! As a tall climber you're correct, I have a lot of advantages. Reach can be very advantageous, especially on bouldering. In my experience the disadvantages of me being tall (therefore the advantages of being shorter!) are: I have a longer reach but I also have longer levers. This means I find certain ...


13

It's a self-belay device for rappelling that works just like a simple figure-eight, but there is a configuration where the lever on the left allows you to release yourself under load. It's meant for canyoning, so you can rappel down some distance before taking a plunge into a pool that's a bit further down than your are comfortable with jumping directly. ...


12

In a bag at the back of your closet will be fine. Your rope is made of nylon, which does not like the following: acids strong alkalis halogens (chlorine, flourine etc. and their compounds) bleaches and strong soaps light (UV in particular) high temperatures (for example over 50°C, such as in a hot car) dirt (sand is especially bad) cats rodents sharp ...


12

All the major climbing sites agree on the two options for cleaning, and the subsequent drying: ukclimbing.com basicrockclimbing.com bealplanet.com etc Wash in cool water (less than 30°C) and use a mild detergent, either in a bath, or in the shower. Some people place it in the shower while they wash. Gentle brushing can help remove grit or sand, but be ...


12

It's not as clear cut as for cycling. For cycling you have definite benefits, and of the 3 listed in the accepted answer on the cycling page: To prevent infection when crashing. To pull off bandages more painlessly after dressing a wound. Are really not an issue in climbing. Crashes in cycling often cause road rash, where dirt, grit, and hair are forced ...


11

One method is to build a brake out of carabiners. The minimum equipment for this is three oval biners plus a locking biner, and the diagrams below show how to construct the system with only this many biners. However, this setup doesn't give much friction, especially with a thin rope, and normally people use at least one more oval, as described in the text ...


11

The diagram shows three situations that are easy to understand without knowing a lot of math or physics. In the first example, the angle between the anchor strands is zero. Both anchors pull straight up on the biner, and each supports 50% of the load. In the second example, all three angles are 120 degrees. The situation is totally symmetrical, so all ...


11

How can I practice specifically for traverses? A lot of climbing gyms (especially bouldering ones) have traversing walls. If you can find one of these practice there. Or find a boulder that you can circuit climb (climb in a circle around the bottom). How should I go about a traverse with Undercut holds specifically? Generally the trick to ...


11

Are my fears of the anchor pieces popping out justified? Yes. This is an especially big concern when the climber has already placed the first piece of pro above the anchor, but falls before getting a second piece in. The fall factor can be large, and the direction of pull is up. If you don't have any gear that can hold against an upward pull, then your ...


10

If you drop a belay plate you can use a Munter Hitch to descend down the rope. Here's an animated example of how to tie this knot (1 to 6 only) It works like a belay plate so if you hold your hand close to your leg it will lock off. Moving it forward releases the slip knot allowing you to rappel. You can use a munter with two ropes (or one rope in half) ...


10

You can buy specialist markers. They're designed to not impact the rope strength. Always use a sepecially designed rope marker as there is a comprehensive list of things to keep away from your rope and marker pen is one of them. The solvents can break down the nylon rope fibres making your rope potentially unsafe.


10

I've had to deal with this question a lot teaching anchor building. When people have asked in the past I normally suggest they use the anchor you are most comfortable setting up, as they will both definitely work. That said, if we want to dive deeper into the rabbit hole, it's important to identify some distinct differences between them. Equalette: ...


9

In a gym, the toprope will be wrapped over a cylindrical bar. Some gyms have it just over the top of the bar (180 degrees of contact), while others give it an additional full wrap around (540 degrees of contact). In the former setup, a belayer can hold the static weight of a climber who weighs roughly twice as much as she does; the friction between the rope ...


9

You can take it back to REI or to another gear store that deals with climbing gear. Make sure they know the rope is indeed being used for climbing. They should be able to cut it and prepare the cut ends so there isn't any fraying/unraveling, etc.


9

It is safe to cut (while you are not using it). You can cut it yourself. I would use something sharp so that you get a clean cut. Healing (using a flame to melt) the cut ends and wrapping them in tape (like they come from the manufacture) will be needed. Before you do that though, you might want to consider not cutting it at all. While a 70 meter rope is ...


9

Is 'learning to fall' something that climbers do through practice or through on-the-job training, as it were? A little of both. You can go to your local gym or outside on routes that you feel comfortable climbing and once you get a few feet above a solid bolt or bomber piece of gear, let go. Read this article on practicing falling, and this one. ...


9

Advanced climbers only Climbing is inherently dangerous. Soloing is even more so. Please learn from experienced people and in person, not from Internet. So this answer mainly describes physical principles, supported by some experience that I have. Here is an excellent tutorial, by a climber more experienced than me, that explains the technique in much ...


9

How about if you just take photos and post them on mountainproject or summitpost, along with verbal descriptions and UTM coordinates? Physically marking the starts of the routes is not compatible with a leave-no-trace ethic.


9

It happened to me. I was the belayer, and it was a slab. The leader panicked before reaching the next bolt and started to walk backwards, pushing her shoulders back, out of control. When the rope finally pulled, most weight was on the upper part of the harness and she flipped down. She hit a spike with the bottom of her head. She had a bad injury despite ...


8

Rather than try to answer the personal part of your question, which as Liam said needs a doctor's attention to answer properly, I shall reply to the more general title: Can a Finger Pulley injury be predicted / anticipated? In an absolute sense I do not believe it can be. In a relative sense it is caused high stress on these "pulleys" so avoiding hard use ...


8

Alright, there are several different issues here that we must be sure to address. I'll give you my thoughts on each of them. As before I recommend receiving in-person instruction as there may be serious technique problems at the root of this question. Sufficient braking friction A basic requirement is that your belayer is able to easily produce enough ...


8

I don't have a lot of experience with cracks myself (I refuse to make my feet hurt, and so far I haven't found a way around that), but I found these videos quite helpful in getting the basic jams correct: Wild Country Crack School with Tom Randall & Pete Whittaker Each video (except the newest ones: #7 Advanced Fingers, and #8 Advanced Hands) is ...


8

This is a perfectly legitimate thing to do. It's not uncommon for climbers to take a 60 or 70 meter rope and cut a few meters off the ends (since the ends of a rope take a lot of abuse). You can either take it to REI, as you suggested, and tell them you are cutting it for climbing or check out this how-to on Climbing.com. A few things you need to consider ...


8

Ice screws have a tendency for pressure melting if constantly loaded over some time. Therefore if you build your fixed point belay system and and keep it under more or less constant load while belaying your partner, the screw might start to migrate as the ice below it melts slowly and refreezes above the screw. By this, a screw that was close to bomb-proof ...


8

Petzl does recommend this for the second bolt: Clip the second bolt at waist level; this reduces the amount of rope out and thus helps prevent the climber hitting the ground in case of a fall before making the clip. (Section F, second panel.) I think that's generally good advice for clipping the second bolt (and sometimes for the third bolt if ...



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