Hot answers tagged

16

Was it better than no protection? Probably. Would I recommend it? No. The reason is this: DMM performed some tests where they anchored a sling to a carabiner and a load (80kg), and dropped the load from various heights. The results are a bit more nuanced, but the gist is that you should never fall onto a sling from at or above the anchor without any dynamic ...


15

Basically, "spotting" someone means making sure that they safely land on their feet and on the pad to prevent injuries in case of a fall. This means several distinct tasks: Moving a falling climber to the pad: try to guide them towards the pad, ideally by pushing at the hips or shoulders. Don't try to catch them (which includes not standing directly ...


15

For the sake of your tendons, it is better to use your ring and middle finger in two finger pockets, and the reason is because of how your nervous system is wired to your hand. You have three nerves in your arm which innervate different fingers in your hand, but take a look at which nerve innervates your ring finger: Your ring finger doesn't have a ...


14

The job of a spotter is to prevent the climber from landing on their head and (if possible) ensure they land on their feet and on the crashpad. This may involve moving the crashpad (which should coincide with the climber having a secure hold or position. The job of a spotter is not to "catch" the climber! That's something they're simply not going to be able ...


13

They don't have certification from the UIAA. As it states on the UIAA official website: The UIAA warns that the following brands may be using the UIAA name and/or Safety Label logo with out UIAA authorization: GM: The UIAA has received email from climbers in USA, Brazil, Finland and Australia that GM advertising gear with the registered UIAA ...


13

There are many types of specialized harnesses, including harnesses for sport, trad, and mountaineering. Personally I use the same harness for trad and mountaineering, and it works fine. For trad climbing, you want four gear loops. Since people don't carry such heavy racks for sport and mountaineering, some harnesses specialized for those activities may not ...


12

All of the above are styles of rock climbing. The differences/similarities are highlighted below: Bouldering Low-level climbing (usually up to about 3m) without the use of a rope. Falls are typically protected against by the use of large portable mats (bouldering mats). Concentrates on technically difficult short climbs. Usually (though not exclusively) ...


12

Of course you want to try simple things first, and waiting is a really simple thing to do. She solved the problem in 15 minutes, which doesn't even seem like an especially long time to me to wait for a second to do a pitch. It could take that long to clean a stuck piece of gear. Another simple solution would be to bring radios in the future, but that doesn't ...


12

The only thing this 30+ years old piece of climbing history should be connected to is a fixture to mount it in a frame or display case.


11

Is that kind of buckle considered obsolete? Obsolete, no, they work fine they've just been superseded by autolock style buckles. what is the reason for this? Quite simply they're just harder to do up wrong. It also means you can adjust your harness faster. Some cheaper harnesses still have single buckle harnesses but the autolock one's are ...


11

If it "easily came out of the rock," then it was at best useless and at worst a safety hazard, because of the possibility that someone might naively trust it. Removing it was a public service. Is it even wise to use pitons that you find in the rock? I use old fixed pins as pro all the time. If it's on a popular climbing route and has obviously been ...


11

If your intending to top-rope with it, or unimaginably lead climb on it, then absolutely not... ever. Polypropylene not only has a super low melting point, but the fibres are a really large diameter, which means they are super susceptible to abrasion, i.e. your rope cutting. It lastly won't stretch when loaded, which is all around bad news in climbing! The ...


11

Top roping over sharp edges is never recommended, but if you insist that's what you want to do then what you want is an edge roller: You can anchor it to the top bolts and hang it right over the edge using accessory cord so that the ropes slide over the rollers instead of the sharp edge: The picture does't show it, but you're supposed to use velcro ...


11

I happen to know for a fact that the steel ring in those anchor set ups is rated to 50kN. That's as much as both hangers combined, they're only rated to 25kN each, which is still double the force any human body will ever be able to produce. The human body is rated to fail somewhere around 12kN which is the amount of force a 1,200kg (2645.5lbs) object would ...


10

There are many phrases that you will find concerning dry treatment of ropes, but they can all be easily related to your three categories: non-dry rope This rope has no treatment to repel water. Consequently it absorbs the most water and thus getting heavier. Wet ropes also loose some of their dynamic properties, so falls will get harder. As it is the ...


10

Yes, it has been done! You can try contacting the people at Paradox Sports; this sort of adaptive climbing is exactly what they do. In terms of personal experiences, there are a couple of threads on Mountain Project covering this issue. (By coincidence, at least two or three of the climbers on those threads work/worked for Paradox.) The first thread has ...


9

As a girl 167cm tall (5'7") I'm on a shorter side of climbers spectra. I believe that while sometimes not being able to reach a hold can mean a no-go on a route, there is plenty of situations where being short gives you the edge: Shorter body means shorter levers. This comes handy in steep overhangs and in any other situation that requires a lot of body ...


9

Leaving a sling behind is not as wasteful as you might think - a sling that has been rappelled off (without a 'biner or ring) must be retired anyway. In the scheme of the cost of recreational activity a few slings and rings add up to a minimal cost. Within reason, waste is not a reason to avoid leaving gear behind. There's a couple of things you can do to ...


9

It's simply for organization sake. Aid climbing on big-walls involves lots of gear, and you'll very quickly realize how much of a mess your perfectly racked gear will become. With two belay loops you can separate your aid ladders and daisy chains a little, which helps to keep them from wrapping around each other (and keep things a little bit cleaner too). ...


9

All of Ben's comments are great, but they mostly deal with what you could do once you are in this situation. Avoiding the situation all together might be easier than you think though and likely the better option. To do so, you would just need to extend your belay, or simply put - don't belay from the over the lip, belay at it. This is a technique I ...


9

I have a friend with cerebral palsy who likes to climb, and can only use one arm, he did fairly well belaying with a Petzl GRIGRI: It's a self locking belay device, and can be used easily and rather safely with only one hand. Though not as safe, you can belay one handed with and ATC easily enough, the trick is to never let go of the rope while belaying, ...


9

Before the climb As @ShemSeger suggests, most of the work is to be done before the climb itself. You need to stay warm belaying your partner and waiting to climb yourself - if your hands and feet are cold beforehand, it will be hard to warm them up when they are in contact with cold stone. What you can do is: Keep your core warm by wearing warm clothes - ...


9

The main reasons is simplicity and habituation: A prusik made from a loop is easily taught and controlled. This is a point that many experienced climber forget about often: When people start they may struggle on the basic knots. So for the first thing to learn a simplicity is more important than functionality. And the prusik is a long established and ...


9

A climber and aborist should be superbly proficient in a knot or technique before relying on it. An Arborist will spend 100's of hours a year climbing - much more than average climbers, and has more time to become proficient in complex techniques, and uses them enough the advantages are worth the effort. Most climbers on the other hand will climb a few ...


8

I both agree and disagree with Michael's answer. If you can train your weaker hand to be as good as your stronger hand then good on you but this isn't always possible. My left is much weaker than my right. I train my left all the time but it's always not as strong as my right. As such, I will sometime vary my approach to "crux" moves so that I can get my ...


8

To add to Ben Crowell's answer, some additional differences between mountaineering and rock-climbing harnesses include comfort while hiking, and weight. Compare the two harnesses below; the first is for alpinism/mountaineering, it's simple, light, and very minimal in size and bulk. A harness like this would be extremely comfortable to hike in, and wouldn't ...


8

Yes, it does get left behind. Descending ring are meant to be used to facilitate the recovery of ropes, they save your rope from getting horribly dirty, damaged, or stuck, and leave much less of an impact than rappelling off of a tree or branch. Pulling you rope off of a tree will saw into the trunk and leave permanent scars, it could even possibly lead ...


8

Big wall climbers always leave their harnesses on, at most they will loosen or unstrap their leg loops while they're in their portaledge. There's really no reason to ever take off your waistbelt, as you can change your pants and shirt with it on (although maybe slightly loosened) and when you toilet you only need to take your leg loops off so you can pull ...


8

What are the differences? The different ropes basically differ by how they have been treated to handle water: non-dry ropes (although I've never seen that mentioned explicitly) have no special treatment at all, dry ropes have only the sheath, treated with some water-repellant, while dry core ones also have a treatment for the core. In both latter cases, the ...


8

The best way to lear how to place protections is to climb sport routes that are also suited to protection placement. Bring plenty of quickdraws (and of gear to place of course). Use the bolts, but place protections as if those were your only alternative up there. This will, as the very first and foremost thing, allow you to place plenty of them. The more, ...



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