Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Years ago in college I took an outdoor rock-climbing class, and what I bought for it were shoes and chalk. I didn't buy anything else, as the ropes and belaying equipment were already provided by the instructor when we went out to climb. Chances are pretty good that if you go with a group of people, someone already has ropes and harnesses.


7

While both materials do have slightly different properties, either one will work in the scenario mentioned. In-fact, any sling with the UIAA stamp of approval will likely have a working strength of 22kn - more force than you will ever be able to generate by falling if being belayed by a rope. The latter part is important, because the rope (among other ...


2

For outdoor single-pitch climbing, a pretty bare minimum is: shoes, harness, belay device, locking carabiner, helmet, nut tool This assumes that you're climbing with someone who owns a rope. Harnesses are pretty generic. Shoes are theoretically not necessary, since people climbed some pretty hard routes in the 1930s in hobnailed boots, but realistically ...


3

Youth, conditioning, and a great attitude towards safety, common sense, and pushing yourself. Safety first. Dead climbers don't get do-overs. You can die very easily at twenty feet up on a 5.6 beginner route. I saw the consequences, his dying body in front of me and his distraught wife just..broken, maybe forever. You don't "get" that reality probably until ...


7

It is a self-locking descender with other uses as well. The official page by the manufacturer states that it's not only meant to be used on canyoning: Multiuse descender device, the only one in the world which can be opened under load. Multi-purpose device suitable for canyoning, special forces, rescue and military application. As a descender it ...


12

It's a self-belay device for rappelling that works just like a simple figure-eight, but there is a configuration where the lever on the left allows you to release yourself under load. It's meant for canyoning, so you can rappel down some distance before taking a plunge into a pool that's a bit further down than your are comfortable with jumping directly. ...


0

You can anchor your belayer, this is especially important to do when multi-pitching, but if you're belayer is always going to be on the ground then she should learn how to catch a fall without being anchored to the floor. It's easier on your gear and it softens your fall if the belayer comes off the ground, especially on big falls. I had one climbing friend ...


1

Be careful to check the health warnings on most sterilizing sprays as most of them state not to get on your skin (I don't wear socks in my climbing shoes). There are also a large number of deodorizers, but they can at times produce a far more distracting scent that will fill a room instead of just filling your shoe. As for freezing your shoes, this can ...


0

I would also not hang your rope on one single cord, because this causes damages on this part. This is a problem specially if you have it over a sharp edge or a small hanger, where diameter gets really small. It's better to have in like you described stored in a dark dry rope bag in a shelf.


5

As the comments have mentioned, grades vary somewhat between gyms, but I think you can still provide some rough guidelines. Peg boards can probably be done by anyone at any climbing level. You're not stressing your fingers really, so there's little chance of injury. It's essentially like practicing pull-ups. It probably won't help your climbing too much ...


11

Are my fears of the anchor pieces popping out justified? Yes. This is an especially big concern when the climber has already placed the first piece of pro above the anchor, but falls before getting a second piece in. The fall factor can be large, and the direction of pull is up. If you don't have any gear that can hold against an upward pull, then your ...



Top 50 recent answers are included