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Ideally, Inspect it indoors, before you leave for Outdoors. :) Look out for tangible signs like wear n tear on outer layer of rope, cuts, brazes etc. For the inner layer, it should be intact as with outer layer. If its moving on its own, should ring bells to your head!


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Are climbing harnesses tested for upside down falls? ... No. Harness have forces gradually applied to them of up to 15kn while attached to a dummy, the dummy is oriented in the head up position and the force is applied as if a person was hanging from the belay loop. Alternatively the harness belt is placed around a cylinder and forces are gradually applied ...


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A few points that haven't been added here yet: A common cause of rope failure that I've read about has come from accidental chemical contamination. For example one unlucky climber left their rope in their car trunk and small amounts of battery acid got on the rope and damaged it. Check the sheath for any evidence of chemical contamination (corrosion, oil, ...


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That brings back memories - the Troll Whillans was the first modern harness on the UK market and I bought one when they came out around 1970. I think I still have it in the shed. Before that, we improvised a harness by wrapping tape around our waist and thighs. As befits the hippy '60s, this was called a Swami Belt. The Whillans was tied on by passing ...


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Not sure there are many places where monkeys would be an issue, but I suppose the issue is the same with other animals. In Europe where climbing ethics are often related to environmental ethics and respect of wildlife and nature, it is usual to leave any nesting animal alone and avoid disturbing them. See the BMC advice for British climbers and birds: ...


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"Jumars" are the quickest method to ascend a fixed rope. They are mechanical devices that lock and each attach to your harness and to leg straps of specified lengths so you can step on one then the other like a ladder and rest on your waist rather than your hands. Climbing with these devices is referred to as "Jugging" and is commonly done by speed ...


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Now after I got some answers I'd like to post my own observations: The most 'efficient' method I found so far with out using foot ascenders is using two conventional ascenders/(or prussiks/tibloc etc) with each a footloop. (And both obviously also connected to your harness for safety.) That way you can use your leggs to push yourself up. But it still can ...


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I don't have a reference handy but in conversations I've had in the past (several years ago) with people who compete/vie for speed records ascending ropes they exclusively use prusiks. If memory serves they preferred the Texas Prusik system. Here is another resource on the technique. The key benefits of using this system is it is efficient, light weight, ...


4

Do spools of webbing still have splices? Yes. As Paul's answer pointed out, there was a well-known accident caused by a climber purchasing webbing with a tape splice in the middle. Furthermore, multiple retailers have various warnings that spools may contain up to three sections (ie, two splices) per 300ft spool of 1in webbing. ...


8

I wouldn't count ascenders as common climbing gear, so I'm answering for gear that almost every climber has available: An ATC Guide (or Reverso, or similar device with a guide mode) and some cord or webbing. You fix the ATC guide to your harness in guide mode, so that you can easily pull in the rope, but it blocks when you load it (i.e. sit in your harness ...


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This may not be the most efficient, but is something I have done with the gear I am always carrying - which to me is more important. On any route where I will be abseiling (or may need to ascend) I always carry my Reverso, as well as a Shunt (or smaller / lighter equivalent device). I use the shunt while abseiling in place of a prusik. I generally have a ...


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One case of taping I personally know to be effective has not yet been addressed. A typical injury in climbing is a lumbrical tear in the most severe case. More likely than a full tear is a strain, which does not even have to involve holding a one finger pocket. A typical symptom is a pronounced pain when load is only applied to some fingers (e.g. only index ...


2

I wouldn't do this the way you propose. If I understand you correctly, you want to clip the top bolt, then have your belayer hold your weight while you set up a top anchor, and you want to know how to unclip your quickdraw after and load the top anchor. My first question would be, why aren't you using a personal anchor? My second question would be, why ...


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This is not a complete answer to my own question, but I came across the following relevant material in the book by Long and Gaines on climbing anchors. For toprope setups, most professional guides use static rope when tying off huge boulders and blocks, since it is more abrasion resistant and less likely to jam in pinches than webbing. Static rope ...


5

In addition to the other answer I'd like to add that ropes are way safer than webbing in a scenarion where it actually comes in contact with rock. This is the case in top rope anchors when you have to tie the rope back over the edge of a cliff. Ropes are designed with a protective layer (mantle) and a load bearing inner part, also when moving, they only ...


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You are clearly overthinking this. Even if your are hanging freely, you should be able to take away your weight from the rope by pulling on gear and unclip the quickdraw (there is nothing that can go wrong, you are on belay). Still there are different ways to do this in a controlled fashion, in practice I only use the following. If there is one solid piece ...


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Wild country crack school is a great resource for learning how to climb cracks. Wild Country Crack School



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