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2

Youth, conditioning, and a great attitude towards safety, common sense, and pushing yourself. Safety first. Dead climbers don't get do-overs. You can die very easily at twenty feet up on a 5.6 beginner route. I saw the consequences, his dying body in front of me and his distraught wife just..broken, maybe forever. You don't "get" that reality probably until ...


4

It is a self-locking descender with other uses as well. The official page by the manufacturer states that it's not only meant to be used on canyoning: Multiuse descender device, the only one in the world which can be opened under load. Multi-purpose device suitable for canyoning, special forces, rescue and military application. As a descender it ...


8

It's a self-belay device for rappelling that works just like a simple figure-eight, but there is a configuration where the lever on the left allows you to release yourself under load. It's meant for canyoning, so you can rappel down some distance before taking a plunge into a pool that's a bit further down than your are comfortable with jumping directly. ...


0

You can anchor your belayer, this is especially important to do when multi-pitching, but if you're belayer is always going to be on the ground then she should learn how to catch a fall without being anchored to the floor. It's easier on your gear and it softens your fall if the belayer comes off the ground, especially on big falls. I had one climbing friend ...


1

Be careful to check the health warnings on most sterilizing sprays as most of them state not to get on your skin (I don't wear socks in my climbing shoes). There are also a large number of deodorizers, but they can at times produce a far more distracting scent that will fill a room instead of just filling your shoe. As for freezing your shoes, this can ...


0

I would also not hang your rope on one single cord, because this causes damages on this part. This is a problem specially if you have it over a sharp edge or a small hanger, where diameter gets really small. It's better to have in like you described stored in a dark dry rope bag in a shelf.


5

As the comments have mentioned, grades vary somewhat between gyms, but I think you can still provide some rough guidelines. Peg boards can probably be done by anyone at any climbing level. You're not stressing your fingers really, so there's little chance of injury. It's essentially like practicing pull-ups. It probably won't help your climbing too much ...


11

Are my fears of the anchor pieces popping out justified? Yes. This is an especially big concern when the climber has already placed the first piece of pro above the anchor, but falls before getting a second piece in. The fall factor can be large, and the direction of pull is up. If you don't have any gear that can hold against an upward pull, then your ...


-1

Rather than roping and unroping (and all the packing and organising this involves) you should really move together roped at all times. So when you get to the base of the climb organise your group and tie everyone on. Loop the rope around your body and tie it up, see the question linked above. You can move on the easier terrain like this, you may add ...


4

If I interpret your question correctly, your problem is not so much about the climbing itself but more about the strategy, i.e. to identify where to rope up and where to remove the rope again. As you say, this can cost you lots of time if you recognize those points too late. This isn't something that you can train by climbing but more a thing that should be ...



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