New answers tagged

2

To add to a set of already great answers I would like to add two points: Glued bolts and weird old bolts. There are generally two types of bolts used presently: Mechanical and glued bolts. Mechanical bolts are mostly sleeve anchors: When tightening the nut the first time a cone is driven under the sleeve which is thus forced against the wall of the borehole....


2

In old routes in European (at least) mountains and in quarries used by cavers for training you can find small expansion bolts called spits or Cheville Autoforeuse. They use just 8 mm thick screws and are very short because they are often drilled by hand. You often need your own hangers but sometimes they could be pre-installed. These can fail. Cavers never ...


4

Having rappelled in waterfalls while canyoneering I can honestly say it's not as scary as it sounds. The rope can get more slippery, but the key is keeping a firm grip. I canyoneer without sticky canyoneering shoes (because they're expensive and I'm cheap) and I slip and fall all the time while getting over the edge of a waterfall or while rappelling down a ...


0

If you're using snap link instead of a figure 8 or other such device and can rig a Bachmann/carabiner, just detach and climb as if you were just free climbing the rope with the foot scissor/stand technique, using one hand to slide a Bachmann/carabiner each time you stand/slide up. Useful if you don't have far to go, you can do more than a few pullups and you'...


6

Very feasible, I know of a couple houses that have a climbing wall on one side, but you'd be better off leaving the siding up, your wall is going to have bolt holes in it which will let in water. You won't need a special support structure, your exterior walls should be framed with 2x6's if it's less than 30 years old, you just need to attach some boards flat ...


1

Lanyard + 2 ascenders + cordelette. So you have lanyard attached to your harness, and ascenders attached to both arms of the lanyard. You fix ascenders on the rope - one will be above the other. Then you attach cordelette to lower ascender and make a loop on its end. So what do we have - you can put all your weight on a lower ascender, then you stand down (...


15

Searching the climbing dictionary for "spit" shows that this is the french term for a "bolt". So the answer is simple: The translation of the guidebook isn't perfect. "Spit anchors" are bolted anchors (or rappels) on these routes. (Which actually matches my observation there.)



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