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I recently got the Mantona Elements, an interesting hybrid camera/trekking backpack: The lower part of the pack contains a small removable camera bag, while on top of it there's some space (not too much, though) for gear, food, clothes, etc. Alternatively, you can reconfigure it without the camera bag to use the entire space like a regular backpack. I'm ...


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I've used a Black Rapid (clone) shoulder strap and added a carabiner that I attach to my belt loop to keep it from swinging or banging against the rocks. I also connect the carabiner to the clip that attaches the camera to the strap so it holds the camera firmly at my waist.


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The real safety issue is the condition of the harness webbing, not the type of buckle. Metal buckles don't soon wear out, whether you have to manually double-back the webbing belt or not. I don't believe the new buckles are mechanically safer, however accidents occurred simply because too many climbers forgot to double-back the webbing belt—enough so that ...


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The products seem to be rip offs of Climb X gear. Here's the ice axe at a cheaper price. It would make more sense to buy the Climb X branded gear since the price difference is small.


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Generally you should be able to assess the quality of each anchor you're going to use by your self. Please read the article "Bolts: Check Your Safety!". Snippet: Make a constant effort to maintain awareness while climbing. When you get to a bolt, even if it has a fixed draw, as you clip the rope: Check your safety! It only takes a casual split second ...


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They don't have certification from the UIAA. As it states on the UIAA official website: The UIAA warns that the following brands may be using the UIAA name and/or Safety Label logo with out UIAA authorization: GM: The UIAA has received email from climbers in USA, Brazil, Finland and Australia that GM advertising gear with the registered UIAA ...


3

Dry ropes and dry-core ropes are very similar. Basically they've been treated so they repel water (this does not make them water proof). "Wet" ropes have no treatment. What do these terms mean, and what are the conditions or types of climbing in which you would prefer one or the other? If you live anywhere where it rains and you plan to climb ...


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What are the differences? The different ropes basically differ by how they have been treated to handle water: non-dry ropes (although I've never seen that mentioned explicitly) have no special treatment at all, dry ropes have only the sheath, treated with some water-repellant, while dry core ones also have a treatment for the core. In both latter cases, the ...


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There are many phrases that you will find concerning dry treatment of ropes, but they can all be easily related to your three categories: non-dry rope This rope has no treatment to repel water. Consequently it absorbs the most water and thus getting heavier. Wet ropes also loose some of their dynamic properties, so falls will get harder. As it is the ...


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Wet ropes are heavier and provide less energy absorption, which is a big problem when you can't avoid wet conditions and you rely on your rope to protect you if you take a fall. Dry ropes have been impregnated with a fluoropolymer-based solution to prevent them from absorbing as much water as possible. Use of dry ropes is essential for alpine and ice ...


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Apparently Galen Rowell took a picture of a goat in the Cirque of the Unclimbables mantling past Galen's rappel anchors with a grade (US) of 5.9+.


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While belaying two seconds at once using the method ShemSeger pointed out is my favorite, it does take a fair amount of experience. If you're just starting out, I recommend you use the Caterpillar technique: You lead on a single rope and belay the second as you would normally, except the second climber trails another rope behind them and clips it into each ...


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I assume you are only looking for options by going from belay to belay (as opposed to continuous securing like going on taught rope). Method using half-ropes: You tie in on both ropes, your partners on a single one each. They belay you normally on both ropes until you set up the belay-station. Then you secure them using Munter hitch or a tuber like system ...


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Double Rope You need two ropes (of obviously different colours so as not to confuse them). Tie into both ropes, one on each side of your belay loop, your seconds will each tie into the other end of one of the ropes. When you set up your belay after you've led the climb, put both ropes into your belay device, you can belay for both of your seconds at once. ...


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Its pretty easy for the 2 seconds being together or always nearby, and a bit stretchy for the one leading the climb (You). When I did one similar not-so-tough scramble,I used a trick that at least worked for me. I was climbing on a single ropes, tied at the center & the two idiots with me were on a single strand each. I used a 8mm'er Beal Cobra rope, ...


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A multi-purpose kids bike helmet / rollerblading helmet would work, but not the bike helmet with holes and a pointy end. I know because the first time I led a climb i used a multi-purpose helmet, non-hole type, padded, and it is much heavier than a climbing helmet. I used it because toproping with a guide I had hit my head on some ledges, and was glad to ...



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