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This is basicaly a cut and paste of my answer here: Rating climbs isn't really a tick box exercise, for a start their are multiple different grading systems all of which are slightly different. You cannot say: well it's at x angle and the hand holds are y size therefore it's w There are a number of different challenges to grading climbs: Climbing ...


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The answer is simple, if not trusting the belay loop grants you safety then why would you trust it? Their lives depend on it, of course they won't trust it and will take measures to ensure that if it fails that they got a backup to fall on. A new born baby can't move at all, but no mother would leave it on a bed where there is a possibility of a miracle of ...


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Obviously there's a good case for considering the wear and tear on the belay loop and harness itself. Consider the case of Todd Skinner: http://www.climbing.com/climber/loss-of-a-legend/ They discussed the worn harness, talking about how people back up the belay loop with a tied sling, but neither considered it a significant safety hazard.


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The Dawn wall is one of the largest and most difficult climbs in the world, it's nearly 1000m of blankness, there isn't a lot to hold onto all the way up. But you're right, it has been "climbed" before. The Dawn wall was first climbed in 1970 by Warren Harding and Dean Caldwell. These climbers used a different technique to what Kevin Jorgeson and Tommy ...


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I would argue you've left off the most subjective of metrics, but the most useful: similarity to other routes in the same area. I don't think there's going to be a single equation to grade a route. You'll have general rules of thumbs that hold true (more holds = easier, more overhang = harder), but those will never give you a grade from first principles. ...



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