Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

The focal knot itself provides redundancy. According to the Ashley Book of Knots, when a cord breaks, it usually does so outside of the knot and not inside. Therefore, if the cord breaks below the knot, like you were concerned, the knot will not usually be affected or unravel. SARRR has an excellent video demonstration of this behavior with an equalized ...


2

The answer to the question in your title is simple: This is not redundant. Is this a problem? It is important to realize the following about redundancy in climbing: Mostly there is no complete redundancy in climbing. You climb with one rope, you use one sling for self arrest, ... In rescue operations we have the order to be always redundantly secured and ...


3

I do not have knowledge about the particular accidents stated in the question, so my answer is directed at rope soloing in general. The fact that more reported accidents happen when rope soloing is moste due to the fact that it is soloing. While in a team many minor accidents can be handled by yourself, so there is a huge number of accidents that do not ...


0

Climbers have traditionally used redundancy for metal objects rather than ropes/slings/etc. because a piece of metal can fail completely, and instantly, from one crack. This is the same reason that we don't use gear that has been dropped, or has an unknown history: a microscopic crack might be there just waiting for a load to open it up. The same concerns ...


5

On cordelettes: A cordelette used to set up a 3 point anchor will have three loops of rope above the knot (one per piece) and three loops below. The knot itself will have 6 strands of rope running through it. (This eats up almost 2 meters of cordelette length alone.) If you cut a single strand the location of the cut hardly matters; you will still have ...


5

Below is the list that I found by googling on "chuck wilts" 1956 tahquitz yds. After the name of each route is the consensus rating on mountainproject.com. Each climb is hyperlinked to a description on mountainproject. 5.0 - The trough, FA 1936 (.4) 5.1 - Fingertip traverse, FA 1936 (.4) 5.2 - Frightful variation of the trough, FA 1944 (.2) 5.3 - East ...


3

I would recommend using a double figure eight I always use this knot when tying off the end of the rope, it's stronger, safer, and it's easier to untie. If that doesn't work for you, then try a double-nine (double figure nine on a bight), it looks messy, but it comes loose real easy.


8

Off width cracks are cracks that are too big to finger jam or fist jam, but too small for you to fit inside and chimney climb, so you have to come up with really awkward and very physically excerting moves to get up them, like climbing upside down (literally). Basically they are cracks that are just the right width to not be fun, and take a lot of physical ...


1

Look at the average heights of the worlds top climbers and very few of them are over 6ft tall. Being tall is an advantage when you start climbing but the harder it gets and the smaller the hand/foot holds get the more advantage there is to being small and light. I'm 6'2" and weight 85kg so moves with high feet push my weight further away from the wall than ...


0

Markers are never a good way to 'mark' your rope. Buy a rope that's already marked with another color. It's in any case better to do it old fashioned and find it using some rope techniques. We use electrical tape on all our equipment. But I cannot guarantee its safety.


6

The difference is in the footwork, you back-step (what I always refer to as dropping your knee) while face climbing, but you can do it while you are laying back. A classic layback is like when you're climbing a crack while smearing your feet against the wall: Back-stepping is when you turn your hip into the wall so that you can get a toe or the outside ...


5

I find myself in agreement with the definitions listed on Climbing.com, so I have excerpted them here: Backstep n, v : To press your shoe’s external edge onto a foothold and drop the knee lightly, thus bringing the sole’s bottom-outside in contact with the rock and your hip in; often opposed against your other foot’s big toe, off which you resolutely ...


2

I do not know a definitive answer to this question, but as there is no other reply so far I will share what I know: When aiding in Yosemite a fellow climber used nuts for this purpose. You pull back the actual nut so that a wire loop extends behind it. This loop is places around the bolt shaft and can even be tightened. According to him this works fairly ...


-2

How about food coloring? It's very benign since it's for human consumption, no solvents, etc.


3

A climbing rope, as in sport-climbing, is also known as a dynamic rope - it stretches when you fall. If you use polypropylene strips and fall 5 metres, even if they are strong enough not to break, the same force acts on your body as if you fell 5 metres onto solid ground. If this weren't a problem, climbers would all be using steel cable which is stronger ...


8

If your intending to top-rope with it, or unimaginably lead climb on it, then absolutely not... ever. Polypropylene not only has a super low melting point, but the fibres are a really large diameter, which means they are super susceptible to abrasion, i.e. your rope cutting. It lastly won't stretch when loaded, which is all around bad news in climbing! The ...


3

In an alpine environment there are many ways more likely that pro could fail than the gate opening - it not like sport or gym climbing where the anchor can be trusted, therefore, its wise to presume no individual anchor will hold, so if a gate did open and release the rope, the rest of the system will keep you safe. Carrying extra screw gates 'just in case' ...


3

First of all, there's no such thing being too safe, do whatever you feel makes you more secure as long as you can do it safely. As long as you place all of your pro properly, then you're unlikely to need to use lockers as intermediate protection between belays, but, all single gate, non-locking carabiners are susceptible to failing if back clipped, or ...


7

I usually carry 10 single-length slings and 2 doubles, which means I have 24 carabiners just for the draws. That's a lot of biners, which is of course why most people will use all wiregates for this. That's not to say that it's impossible to do otherwise. I imagine that people climbing in the 1970s would have used nylon slings and non-wiregate oval biners, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included