New answers tagged

10

Assuming a vertical, as opposed to traversing, route that is not overhanging, you unclip the rope from the piece and then pull yourself up just like the leader did. Once you are high enough above the piece to account for rope stretch you have the leader take in the slack. The key is that after weighting the rope you want your hands to be at the same height ...


-1

My suggestion would be to use your long sling and place three carabiners with clove hitches into it. This offers the following advantages: With the clove hitches you could adjust the entire assembly to the ideal length. The sling is not in danger of getting damaged by the hangers You minimize single points of failure (Apart from the third carabiner and ...


3

It is hard to tell from the photo exactly how the carabiner would be loaded if clipped directly to the bolts. I think of cross loading as when the carabiner is weighted along the minor (short) axis. I wouldn't use the term cross loading when a carabiner gets weighted over an edge or weird bump in the rock. In general, if you do not feel confident in the ...


6

Because I trust my biners way more than I trust a sling threaded though bolts, I consider a relying on (my) single biner safer than the above set up. With the hardware visible to me in that picture I would make a single point anchor using two biners, sling and one bolt, and back it up with the sling though the other bolt providing redundancy. Effectively ...


8

Webbing/cord and bolts I always learned that bolts and any kind of webbing or cord is a no-go. Even if the edges are not sharp the webbing/cord is bent around a very small radius which weakens it significantly. Today there is one new option: Kevlar cords. These can be used directly in bolts, as they are very abrasion resistant. So if you have any with ...


8

General advice for climbing at night: Don't do it if you are new to climbing. Avoid it, even if you are not new to climbing. Be prepared for it on long routes, even when you are not expecting to be climbing at night. Most of my night-climbing came about unplanned. Make sure you can do everything involved in climbing with your eyes closed. In the shower. (...


6

Depends on your headlamp. I use a Petzl Ultra Vario headlamp for caving that can cast a beam 200m, so when I've got that on I can see pretty much the same as climbing during the day. I've climbed at night before, there wasn't any real significant difference. We happened to be climbing during a full moon as well, and as soon as that moon came out it was ...


2

Doesn't really matter for top roping, you've got so much rope out when you're top roping that when you take a fall pretty much all the force is absorbed by the rope, your anchor is holding only a little more than the body weight of you and your belayer most of the time. Mountain guides will tie an overhand knot, figure eight, or figure nine depending on ...


9

Route finding might be a problem: If the approach is not obvious (from what I read about Snake Dike, it isn't), you could waste much time blundering there, looking for cairns and what not. You could miss an important belay point on the route. You could wander off to another (harder) route in the middle; it happens to me all the time during the day, so I ...


3

This answer does not provide much new information to Ben Crowell's and Charlie Brumbaugh's, but I am not entirely in agreement with all their different conclusions. TLDR: In your use case and most use cases strength reduction by a knot is not an issue, so use whatever save knot you are comfortable with. In general consider the rule of 50% strength reduction ...


0

Your needs will vary depending on expected temperature. Your provisions for a 35 C night and a -35 C will be drastically different. Ultralight gear will help, but can only go so far. Whether or not you sleep warm or cold will determine how comfortable you are, as well as your age. The older you are, the more warmth you'll need as your metabolism slows. ...


4

His opinion was that I could tie an overhand for the master point and be just as safeā€“the only downside being that it would be more difficult to untie after being loaded. Yes, this is correct. Many people seem to think that commonly used climbing knots can slip if there's not enough friction to make them hold, and that we should choose a knot based on ...


0

It's not specifically answering your question (I don't use either rope or webbing in my anchors, yet) but I really wanted to say that I'm a huge fan of having a chunk of static rope near my anchors. It's one of my most unexpectedly handy pieces of gear. The main reason I got it was for rappelling to anchor stations to set top-ropes (I don't lead climb, so ...



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