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As a girl 167cm tall (5'7") I'm on a shorter side of climbers spectra. I believe that while sometimes not being able to reach a hold can mean a no-go on a route, there is plenty of situations where being short gives you the edge: Shorter body means shorter levers. This comes handy in steep overhangs and in any other situation that requires a lot of body ...


5

Not much advantage being a short climber to be honest.I'm probably the shortest around, I'm 5'1" male @ 120lbs and getting stronger in my mid 30's. I can solve most problems, but not all reachy problems with no intermediates. Be creative all the most, no different than your daily life. Its what life has brought to me is to think outside the box. Sometimes ...


3

Wikipedia has a simple treatment of this problem, as well as some notes on at least one of the reasons why the simple treatment is only a very rough approximation. Let F_0 be the impact force quoted by the manufacturer, which is normally 12 kN for a single rope. Let m_0 be the 80 kg mass used for lab tests, let f_0=1.77, and let u=F_0/m_0g≈15.3. Then in ...


6

Out of all the products that are out there for climbing, Dyneema is considered to be the most abrasion resistant. That means that it is the least likely to be cut on a sharp edge, in fact Dyneema is used to make cut-resistant gloves, but that does not mean it's impossible to cut. Dyneema Properties Whether or not your sling would be cut by a rock edge ...


5

A water knot is the best knot for joining two ends of webbing, I wouldn't recommend any other knot except for maybe the beer knot, but that's certainly not going to save you any time. You don't need to tie back up knots either, webbing doesn't slip like rope does, in fact I've never known webbing to slip at all, and I've set up a lot of slacklines using 1" ...



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