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5

Rest! I know you're going to want to climb every second of every day but you must give your ligaments time to heal! Muscle takes two days to repair however ligaments can take 1 -2 weeks. Gradually increase your time climbing, this will greatly reduce the chance of injury. Familiarize yourself with all the necessary safety requirements, do you know what a ...


0

Due to the different requirements of several types of climbing there are lots of different scales. There are systems all over the world: some are typical for North America, some for the Alps and some for Scotland/UK. Most are measured on the toughest spot (would be interested which ratings aren't scaled like this). @Ben Crowell gave a nice detailed answer ...


5

For cams, Black Diamond recommends: With occasional use: slings should be replaced every 5-8 years With frequent use: slings should be replaced 2-5 years. This sounds like a good policy for any other soft good (from tricams to harnesses). As you mentioned, harsher use or any sign of damage can significantly reduce this time frame. Some other resources: ...


7

Suppose I get to the top of a sport route ... and I want to ... end up with a top-rope setup. "Top-rope setup" implies that someone else is going to climb the same route after you get down, right? Can anyone lay out all the typical steps...? Hang a locking karabiner (or a pair of non-locking quickdraws) on the anchor Clip your rope into it ...


6

What you're talking about is called Cleaning Cleaning This video covers the process in detail. But in short: Attach your self to the top anchor with a spare clip draw (or two), or better yet a sling attached to your harness using a larks foot and a locking biner. Inform your belayer that you're safe (but not off belay) Tie a figure of eight on the bight ...


3

This topic will be incomplete without mentioning the good old dulfersitz method used by our fathers when there were no belay plates and no carabiners. This method doesn't require any equipment other than the rope itself. And, well, sturdy clothes. The method is to pass the rope around your body in a special way shown in the picture 1 below. Picture 2 shows ...


-2

Curiouser and curiouser! /Alice in Wonderland/ DISCLAIMER: this is definitely not a proven advice from the book and may be suitable only for experienced climbers, who do it on their own risk! Wonder what to do if you have no spare carabiners for the carabiner brake and need to descend many rope lengths so that Munter Hitch would twist and damage it ...


7

One method is to build a brake out of carabiners. The minimum equipment for this is three oval biners plus a locking biner, and the diagrams below show how to construct the system with only this many biners. However, this setup doesn't give much friction, especially with a thin rope, and normally people use at least one more oval, as described in the text ...


10

The diagram shows three situations that are easy to understand without knowing a lot of math or physics. In the first example, the angle between the anchor strands is zero. Both anchors pull straight up on the biner, and each supports 50% of the load. In the second example, all three angles are 120 degrees. The situation is totally symmetrical, so all ...


1

This is due to the load that is passed to each anchor. You might think that (for example) two anchors will receive 50% load each during a fall or simply when the climber weights the rope. But actually the amount of load an anchor receives depends on the angle of the rope that this is attached to. Typically a belay with two anchor points forms a triangle ...


8

If you drop a belay plate you can use a Munter Hitch to descend down the rope. Here's an animated example of how to tie this knot (1 to 6 only) It works like a belay plate so if you hold your hand close to your leg it will lock off. Moving it forward releases the slip knot allowing you to rappel. You can use a munter with two ropes (or one rope in half) ...



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