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7

There are many phrases that you will find concerning dry treatment of ropes, but they can all be easily related to your three categories: non-dry rope This rope has no treatment to repel water. Consequently it absorbs the most water and thus getting heavier. Wet ropes also loose some of their dynamic properties, so falls will get harder. As it is the ...


7

I would use a dyneema rope as a lightweight hauling rope, rap line, or rescue rope, but I would never use any kind of static rope to catch a fall, this would include a fall into a crevasse, or a slip on a slope. With static ropes there is nearly zero energy absorption, I image this is even more true with dyneema. In the event of a fall during glacier ...


5

What are the differences? The different ropes basically differ by how they have been treated to handle water: non-dry ropes (although I've never seen that mentioned explicitly) have no special treatment at all, dry ropes have only the sheath, treated with some water-repellant, while dry core ones also have a treatment for the core. In both latter cases, the ...


4

Do not use this cordelette for your protections: Knots will slip so the connection of the cordelette ends to form a ring will fail under load. Only use sewed Dyneema slings. Still Dyneema cordelettes are often used for climbing as they are much lighter for the same strength than nylon based ones. To know how this is possible despite the problem mentioned we ...


3

Coming from a climbing background, I would propose the following: Tie the cord/rope into a loop, for example using the One-sided overhand bend or the double fisherman's knot Secure it around the pole using a Prusik knot. Note that the english wikipedia entry is only about climbing; the german version also mentions that this friction knot can be used e.g. ...


3

Dry ropes and dry-core ropes are very similar. Basically they've been treated so they repel water (this does not make them water proof). "Wet" ropes have no treatment. What do these terms mean, and what are the conditions or types of climbing in which you would prefer one or the other? If you live anywhere where it rains and you plan to climb ...


3

Wet ropes are heavier and provide less energy absorption, which is a big problem when you can't avoid wet conditions and you rely on your rope to protect you if you take a fall. Dry ropes have been impregnated with a fluoropolymer-based solution to prevent them from absorbing as much water as possible. Use of dry ropes is essential for alpine and ice ...


1

The short answer by testing is yes, it is perfectly suited in those cases. Peter Popall and the Petzl team tested static and dynamic ropes for crevasse falls and held more falls with the static ones. In a ski touring guide course I attended this year one mountaineering guide brought such a rope with him. He uses it all the time and already had one real case ...



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