Hot answers tagged

9

A climber and aborist should be superbly proficient in a knot or technique before relying on it. An Arborist will spend 100's of hours a year climbing - much more than average climbers, and has more time to become proficient in complex techniques, and uses them enough the advantages are worth the effort. Most climbers on the other hand will climb a few ...


9

The main reasons is simplicity and habituation: A prusik made from a loop is easily taught and controlled. This is a point that many experienced climber forget about often: When people start they may struggle on the basic knots. So for the first thing to learn a simplicity is more important than functionality. And the prusik is a long established and ...


8

Carabiners always attach to the belay loop. Attaching carabiners to the tie-in-points causes them to get loaded incorrectly. Carabiners are designed to load the spine, which is the side opposite the gate. Attaching a carabiner to the tie-in-points causes the gate to be loaded, since three strands get loaded (the tie-in loops and the rope end). An ...


5

For the most part they are identical, the only identifiable difference is that military spec tube webbing has a ribbed weave, while climbing spec has a smooth weave. Having a smooth weave obviously makes tube webbing better for tying and most importantly, untying knots; it also makes it a lot easier to pull through your carabiners, especially when stacked. ...


4

Something that occurred to me after asking is that a Prusik is bidirectional, whereas generally the arborist's knots are unidirectional. I believe the unidirectional knots are easier to both slide up and release, making them superior in a dedicated climbing rig, but their application is limited as well. Following both existing answers emphasizing ...


4

Two answers: If you are climbing toprope, then you connect the rope via locking carabiner to your belay loop. You do not have to expect high forces. If you are leading you should tie the rope directly to the tie in loops. When falling in a lead you have to expect much higher forces than when toproping. They can relatively easily exceed the crossloading ...


4

In addition to @ShemSeger's answer, there exists another minor difference that is also visible in his images: On the red webbing, there are three white threads. Each of these threads stands for 5kN of strength. All climbing webbing that I know has this kind of marking, though often in a different color. At first glance, this might seen to conflict with the ...


1

This question has already been well answered but I would like to address a slightly different point: What's the problem with a wet rope anyway? Dynamic climbing ropes are, to the best of my knowledge, universally manufactured from Nylon 6 or Nylon 6,6. Nylon is a somewhat unusual polymer in that it readily absorbs water, and its properties change ...



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