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8

This is a bad plan for several reasons. YakTrax are not well suited for this situation. YakTrax are more specialized for people who want to go running on city streets in places with cold winters. For mountaineering, they're basically useless. They don't give enough extra traction. Microspikes or crampons would be more appropriate. Roping up is a ...


7

Suppose I get to the top of a sport route ... and I want to ... end up with a top-rope setup. "Top-rope setup" implies that someone else is going to climb the same route after you get down, right? Can anyone lay out all the typical steps...? Hang a locking karabiner (or a pair of non-locking quickdraws) on the anchor Clip your rope into it ...


6

In general it sounds you're not doing anything obviously stupid and you just need more practice. I generally rack some 'draws on both sides - sometimes it can be handy to avoid reaching across. And you can often avoid the 'draw falling into the crack by resting it on a hold, across your wrist or something like that. Try not to place/clip gear far above ...


6

What you're talking about is called Cleaning Cleaning This video covers the process in detail. But in short: Attach your self to the top anchor with a spare clip draw (or two), or better yet a sling attached to your harness using a larks foot and a locking biner. Inform your belayer that you're safe (but not off belay) Tie a figure of eight on the bight ...


6

The manufacturer of your rope says: Time in use : The potential lifetime of BEAL PPE in use is up to a maximum of 10 years. The lifetime of the rope in use must never exceed 10 years. The rope must be retired immediately: if it has held a major fall, approaching fall factor 2 if inspection reveals or even indicates damage to the ...


4

Roping up would be a bad idea. A good rule of thumb is that you should only rope up if you can place protection between climbers (i.e. attach the rope to something). Glaciers are a different story, but that's not where you're going. Many accidents have occurred when one rope mate falls and takes all the others with them. As far as using YaxTrax , that is ...


4

What is your intended use for those joined ropes? If your life depends on it (you tagged your question with "safety"), I would not recommend using drastically different sized ropes in the first place and I would recommend something that has been well tested by the rock-climbing community. Most rock climbers either join their ropes with the double fisherman's ...


4

Cordelettes are an American obsession. In the UK and Europe most people climb multipitch on double ropes. In this case, and if one is swapping leads, then an anchor with up to four pieces with the rope is trivially easy. Clove hitch to first piece, little loop of slack, clove hitch to second piece, tie rope back to locker krab on harness. Repeat with second ...


3

A cordolette gives you the most versatility and is definitely the way to go in most situations, especially if you are relatively new to climbing. A disclaimer before I elaborate any further: Reading a book on anchor-building is not enough to be able to construct a save belay anchor. Read the book and then have an experienced climber teach you in the ...


3

You extend placements with trad draws when the line you are climbing wanders, in order to minimize rope drag. You do not always need to extend them. I climb with a mix of short sport-type draws and extendable trad draws for that reason. Sometimes you can even just clip the racking biner that the cam was hanging on already (obviously for nuts or anything ...


3

You can cut it yourself. I would use something sharp so that you get a clean cut. Healing (using a flame to melt) the cut ends and wrapping them in tape (like they come from the manufacture) will be needed. Before you do that though, you might want to consider not cutting it at all. While a 70 meter rope is pretty long for most applications in climbing, ...


2

This is a perfectly legitimate thing to do. It's not uncommon for climbers to take a 60 or 70 meter rope and cut a few meters off the ends (since the ends of a rope take a lot of abuse). You can either take it to REI, as you suggested, and tell them you are cutting it for climbing or check out this how-to on Climbing.com. A few things you need to consider ...


2

None of the information you give about your planned use case sets any limitation to a standard dynamical sports climbing rope. Also you won't notice small differences in the specs especially as it is your first rope to buy. Those different specs will only make a difference as you bring a rope to its limits. For example with routes where you have huge bolt ...


2

If you ask the rope manufacturers they typically advise to drop a rope after between two and ten years depending on the usage. For most non-professional climbers I would typically head more towards ten than towards 2 years, as long as there haven't been any incidents that substantiate suspicion that it might have any damage. According to this article from ...


2

As other posters said, roping together is not a good idea, at least if you are not an experienced mountaineer. Now on how you can do your trip in safety. When walking on ice and frozen dirt, don't rely on self-arrest. You can self arrest on the steep (>5-10 degrees) ice only by hitting it hard with your ice-axe and only during the first second while you ...


2

When considering the knots, there are several characteristics you would like to take into account: is it useful, that is, it's better to know only a few reliable knots well, than a lot of fancy ones poorly; is it secure, do not use insecure knots, you will only hurt someone; is it easy to tie, for example can you make it fast in the dark (i.e. with feel ...


1

Definiely do not attempt to keep them separate on the route. Uncoil and stack them separately at the start, but thereafter handle them as one. Make sure that leader and second both tie the same rope on the same side so that they are not crossed over. I've never used a rope basket, but it doesn't seem like a bad idea if you don't mind the weight. Otherwise ...


1

From this site: The Rope Basket This system works well on stances where you are standing comfortably on a ledge, but you don't have enough space to flake the rope. It is also much easier if you are swinging leads. Your personal anchor system or tie-in is connected to your anchor, making a straight line to the rock. As your second climbs upward, you will ...


1

This will depend entirely on the type of boom and outhaul. If you have a simple straight through outhaul: If you have completely lost the outhaul, either get yourself a fish tape (from your local DIY store) or use a small plumb bob and fishing line. A fish tape should work even when the boom is horizontal, but in order to use a plumb bob you'll probably ...


1

The first two images on this site (pictured below) show how you can pack your rope without producing tangles. Note that the final knot that fixes everything does not really matter with respect to tangles. The important part is to not pick up the rope in closed rings as every ring will introduce a twist of the rope into the same direction. Instead pick it ...



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