Hot answers tagged

15

Twin ropes can be as small as 6.9mm (35g/m), and are only used in pairs; you tie into two ropes, and clip both as though they were a single rope. This provides you with the redundancy of having more than one rope, but without the weight of carrying two single ropes. Twin ropes also allow a full-rope-length rappel which often strongly factors in the choice ...


14

Whether you run out of rope or just can't complete the route, you have to bail as safely as possible. As soon as your belayer reaches the rope's middle mark, he should double check that there's a stopper knot at the end. Then, you would down climb to the nearest bolt and then proceed to bail on the route using a prusik backup, as described by this old Petzl ...


12

You'll need to test to be sure, but it will lose quite a bit of strength. When I sailed, I was taught that you lose as much as 80% strength by tying a knot. So if you have 500 lb paracord, by this estimate it could support about 100 pounds reliably when knotted. The weakening is at the point of the knot, so multiple knots doesn't further decrease the ...


12

The one way I know to remove the twists from a climbing rope, requires for the rope not to be hanging nor in use in any way. The procedure is quite simple but may require help from your partner: Have your parter attach an ATC with a carabiner to the belay loop in her harness (if your partner is otherwise engaged, you can tie the ATC and carabiner to a ...


11

If your intending to top-rope with it, or unimaginably lead climb on it, then absolutely not... ever. Polypropylene not only has a super low melting point, but the fibres are a really large diameter, which means they are super susceptible to abrasion, i.e. your rope cutting. It lastly won't stretch when loaded, which is all around bad news in climbing! The ...


10

There are many phrases that you will find concerning dry treatment of ropes, but they can all be easily related to your three categories: non-dry rope This rope has no treatment to repel water. Consequently it absorbs the most water and thus getting heavier. Wet ropes also loose some of their dynamic properties, so falls will get harder. As it is the ...


10

First some general dangers not related to melting: Burning your hands braking on the rope (can also happen with semiautomatic descenders like a grigri due to reflex) Uncontrolled impact on the rock Without a backup knot (e.g. prusik) and with a passive descender (e.g. tuber, eight) you may let go of the rope due to the heat induced pain or when impacting ...


9

Essentially para cord is stronger, but its less resilient. Climbing ropes do not need to be strong - you die above about 10G (1000kg) force from internal injuries caused by your harness, a braking strain above this is pointless, even if the rope does not break in a fall that generates very high G forces, you die. Anchors have a force, which if exceeded ...


9

The main reasons is simplicity and habituation: A prusik made from a loop is easily taught and controlled. This is a point that many experienced climber forget about often: When people start they may struggle on the basic knots. So for the first thing to learn a simplicity is more important than functionality. And the prusik is a long established and ...


9

A climber and aborist should be superbly proficient in a knot or technique before relying on it. An Arborist will spend 100's of hours a year climbing - much more than average climbers, and has more time to become proficient in complex techniques, and uses them enough the advantages are worth the effort. Most climbers on the other hand will climb a few ...


8

What are the differences? The different ropes basically differ by how they have been treated to handle water: non-dry ropes (although I've never seen that mentioned explicitly) have no special treatment at all, dry ropes have only the sheath, treated with some water-repellant, while dry core ones also have a treatment for the core. In both latter cases, the ...


8

I would use a dyneema rope as a lightweight hauling rope, rap line, or rescue rope, but I would never use any kind of static rope to catch a fall, this would include a fall into a crevasse, or a slip on a slope. With static ropes there is nearly zero energy absorption, I image this is even more true with dyneema. In the event of a fall during glacier ...


8

Climbing ropes are meant to hold falls, and to absorb the shock of the fall itself through stretching (they can stretch up to 30% of their length during a severe fall so to reduce the impact force on the climber). There's no need for a climbing rope to hold more than it does, because any more force during a fall and the body of the falling climber would be ...


8

A wreck reel sold for scuba divers might give you what you want. They vary from simple line holders up through heavy duty reels.


8

Carabiners always attach to the belay loop. Attaching carabiners to the tie-in-points causes them to get loaded incorrectly. Carabiners are designed to load the spine, which is the side opposite the gate. Attaching a carabiner to the tie-in-points causes the gate to be loaded, since three strands get loaded (the tie-in loops and the rope end). An ...


7

Good grief. The question was about getting the kinks out, not the merits of the Munter (which is invaluable, see David Fasulo's Self Rescue). The best option, while on the rock, esp. if it is a nice day, is to hang your rope from one end, and slightly weight the other (to keep it from blowing around, tangling in trees, whatever). If you have a swivel ...


6

As mentioned in comments, this option to coil a rope will get you some twists in it. So I do not recommend it for longer ropes (i.e. your climbing ropes), as twists are very inconvenient when belaying. This mode is mainly suited for cordelettes that you want to attach to your harness and therefore should be compact. To create such a coil follow these steps: ...


6

In theory maybe, in practice no. UV damage is a bigger threat to ropes. Climbers repeatedly tie knots (which temporarily reduce the strength of a rope) into the ends of a rope. Then they proceed to fall on that rope with often high amounts of force repeatedly. Their ropes don't break due to the strain and repeated knots. Sailors will sail with nylon ropes ...


6

The first thing I would do is yell down to my belayer to put a knot in the end of the rope. You could also try to evaluate the situation and try to figure out what happened. Is it a route that requires a 70 meter rope, and you just didn't realize that? Is it possible that you passed by a belay and didn't see it? Next you could look around for options, such ...


6

I agree that good quality para cord (look for 550 cord from a reputable supplier) is the best general purpose solution. It is strong enough that you could just about abseil off it with nothing else than a couple of carabiners in an absolute life or death situation or use it as a safety line for crossing a river or lowering your pack over a steep incline or ...


6

A single strand of 550 paracord will hold body weight, so when you say, "load bearing" are you implying more than body weight? If not, then I think it's a non-issue, especially if you're weaving or knitting verses knotting; knots significantly decrease the breaking strength of ropes and cord, bending: not as much. Paracord will be more than suitable for ...


5

Do not use this cordelette for your protections: Knots will slip so the connection of the cordelette ends to form a ring will fail under load. Only use sewed Dyneema slings. Still Dyneema cordelettes are often used for climbing as they are much lighter for the same strength than nylon based ones. To know how this is possible despite the problem mentioned we ...


5

Dry ropes and dry-core ropes are very similar. Basically they've been treated so they repel water (this does not make them water proof). "Wet" ropes have no treatment. What do these terms mean, and what are the conditions or types of climbing in which you would prefer one or the other? If you live anywhere where it rains and you plan to climb ...


5

Wet ropes are heavier and provide less energy absorption, which is a big problem when you can't avoid wet conditions and you rely on your rope to protect you if you take a fall. Dry ropes have been impregnated with a fluoropolymer-based solution to prevent them from absorbing as much water as possible. Use of dry ropes is essential for alpine and ice ...


5

A climbing rope, as in sport-climbing, is also known as a dynamic rope - it stretches when you fall. If you use polypropylene strips and fall 5 metres, even if they are strong enough not to break, the same force acts on your body as if you fell 5 metres onto solid ground. If this weren't a problem, climbers would all be using steel cable which is stronger ...


5

For the most part they are identical, the only identifiable difference is that military spec tube webbing has a ribbed weave, while climbing spec has a smooth weave. Having a smooth weave obviously makes tube webbing better for tying and most importantly, untying knots; it also makes it a lot easier to pull through your carabiners, especially when stacked. ...


5

Static rope may not be that much more expensive than equivalent tape and is certainly a lot more versatile. In particular rope gives you a lot more options for reliable knots which are also be familiar from climbing rope use. Many people consider any knot in tape to be a bit suspect. The range of knots may come into play when rigging more complex anchors ...


5

In addition to the other answer I'd like to add that ropes are way safer than webbing in a scenarion where it actually comes in contact with rock. This is the case in top rope anchors when you have to tie the rope back over the edge of a cliff. Ropes are designed with a protective layer (mantle) and a load bearing inner part, also when moving, they only ...


5

I would go with either a barrel hitch or a barrel sling depending on the exact purpose. With the added constraint that the rope can only go around the object once the the "magic" needs to be in the knot/hitch, I think a trucker's hitch is probably best (but not very good). It will let you get a tight fit. The holding power will depend on the stiffness and ...


4

Based on the picture the OP presents, the yellow prusik cord weave has each pair of threads (likely not the correct term) passing over 3 or 4 threads rather than two. This doubling of length and corresponding reduction of crossing points seems likely to make the cord more flexible than the orange cord, a feature that will assist in making the tight wraps of ...



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