Hot answers tagged

16

Twin ropes can be as small as 6.9mm (35g/m), and are only used in pairs; you tie into two ropes, and clip both as though they were a single rope. This provides you with the redundancy of having more than one rope, but without the weight of carrying two single ropes. Twin ropes also allow a full-rope-length rappel which often strongly factors in the choice ...


14

Whether you run out of rope or just can't complete the route, you have to bail as safely as possible. As soon as your belayer reaches the rope's middle mark, he should double check that there's a stopper knot at the end. Then, you would down climb to the nearest bolt and then proceed to bail on the route using a prusik backup, as described by this old Petzl ...


12

You'll need to test to be sure, but it will lose quite a bit of strength. When I sailed, I was taught that you lose as much as 80% strength by tying a knot. So if you have 500 lb paracord, by this estimate it could support about 100 pounds reliably when knotted. The weakening is at the point of the knot, so multiple knots doesn't further decrease the ...


12

The one way I know to remove the twists from a climbing rope, requires for the rope not to be hanging nor in use in any way. The procedure is quite simple but may require help from your partner: Have your parter attach an ATC with a carabiner to the belay loop in her harness (if your partner is otherwise engaged, you can tie the ATC and carabiner to a ...


11

First some general dangers not related to melting: Burning your hands braking on the rope (can also happen with semiautomatic descenders like a grigri due to reflex) Uncontrolled impact on the rock Without a backup knot (e.g. prusik) and with a passive descender (e.g. tuber, eight) you may let go of the rope due to the heat induced pain or when impacting ...


11

If your intending to top-rope with it, or unimaginably lead climb on it, then absolutely not... ever. Polypropylene not only has a super low melting point, but the fibres are a really large diameter, which means they are super susceptible to abrasion, i.e. your rope cutting. It lastly won't stretch when loaded, which is all around bad news in climbing! The ...


9

Essentially para cord is stronger, but its less resilient. Climbing ropes do not need to be strong - you die above about 10G (1000kg) force from internal injuries caused by your harness, a braking strain above this is pointless, even if the rope does not break in a fall that generates very high G forces, you die. Anchors have a force, which if exceeded ...


9

The main reasons is simplicity and habituation: A prusik made from a loop is easily taught and controlled. This is a point that many experienced climber forget about often: When people start they may struggle on the basic knots. So for the first thing to learn a simplicity is more important than functionality. And the prusik is a long established and ...


9

A climber and aborist should be superbly proficient in a knot or technique before relying on it. An Arborist will spend 100's of hours a year climbing - much more than average climbers, and has more time to become proficient in complex techniques, and uses them enough the advantages are worth the effort. Most climbers on the other hand will climb a few ...


8

Climbing ropes are meant to hold falls, and to absorb the shock of the fall itself through stretching (they can stretch up to 30% of their length during a severe fall so to reduce the impact force on the climber). There's no need for a climbing rope to hold more than it does, because any more force during a fall and the body of the falling climber would be ...


8

As mentioned in comments, this option to coil a rope will get you some twists in it. So I do not recommend it for longer ropes (i.e. your climbing ropes), as twists are very inconvenient when belaying. This mode is mainly suited for cordelettes that you want to attach to your harness and therefore should be compact. To create such a coil follow these steps: ...


8

A wreck reel sold for scuba divers might give you what you want. They vary from simple line holders up through heavy duty reels.


8

Carabiners always attach to the belay loop. Attaching carabiners to the tie-in-points causes them to get loaded incorrectly. Carabiners are designed to load the spine, which is the side opposite the gate. Attaching a carabiner to the tie-in-points causes the gate to be loaded, since three strands get loaded (the tie-in loops and the rope end). An ...


7

Good grief. The question was about getting the kinks out, not the merits of the Munter (which is invaluable, see David Fasulo's Self Rescue). The best option, while on the rock, esp. if it is a nice day, is to hang your rope from one end, and slightly weight the other (to keep it from blowing around, tangling in trees, whatever). If you have a swivel (e....


6

I agree that good quality para cord (look for 550 cord from a reputable supplier) is the best general purpose solution. It is strong enough that you could just about abseil off it with nothing else than a couple of carabiners in an absolute life or death situation or use it as a safety line for crossing a river or lowering your pack over a steep incline or ...


6

The first thing I would do is yell down to my belayer to put a knot in the end of the rope. You could also try to evaluate the situation and try to figure out what happened. Is it a route that requires a 70 meter rope, and you just didn't realize that? Is it possible that you passed by a belay and didn't see it? Next you could look around for options, such ...


6

In theory maybe, in practice no. UV damage is a bigger threat to ropes. Climbers repeatedly tie knots (which temporarily reduce the strength of a rope) into the ends of a rope. Then they proceed to fall on that rope with often high amounts of force repeatedly. Their ropes don't break due to the strain and repeated knots. Sailors will sail with nylon ropes ...


6

A single strand of 550 paracord will hold body weight, so when you say, "load bearing" are you implying more than body weight? If not, then I think it's a non-issue, especially if you're weaving or knitting verses knotting; knots significantly decrease the breaking strength of ropes and cord, bending: not as much. Paracord will be more than suitable for ...


5

For the most part they are identical, the only identifiable difference is that military spec tube webbing has a ribbed weave, while climbing spec has a smooth weave. Having a smooth weave obviously makes tube webbing better for tying and most importantly, untying knots; it also makes it a lot easier to pull through your carabiners, especially when stacked. ...


5

A climbing rope, as in sport-climbing, is also known as a dynamic rope - it stretches when you fall. If you use polypropylene strips and fall 5 metres, even if they are strong enough not to break, the same force acts on your body as if you fell 5 metres onto solid ground. If this weren't a problem, climbers would all be using steel cable which is stronger ...


5

Static rope may not be that much more expensive than equivalent tape and is certainly a lot more versatile. In particular rope gives you a lot more options for reliable knots which are also be familiar from climbing rope use. Many people consider any knot in tape to be a bit suspect. The range of knots may come into play when rigging more complex anchors ...


5

In addition to the other answer I'd like to add that ropes are way safer than webbing in a scenarion where it actually comes in contact with rock. This is the case in top rope anchors when you have to tie the rope back over the edge of a cliff. Ropes are designed with a protective layer (mantle) and a load bearing inner part, also when moving, they only ...


5

I would go with either a barrel hitch or a barrel sling depending on the exact purpose. With the added constraint that the rope can only go around the object once the the "magic" needs to be in the knot/hitch, I think a trucker's hitch is probably best (but not very good). It will let you get a tight fit. The holding power will depend on the stiffness and ...


4

Based on the picture the OP presents, the yellow prusik cord weave has each pair of threads (likely not the correct term) passing over 3 or 4 threads rather than two. This doubling of length and corresponding reduction of crossing points seems likely to make the cord more flexible than the orange cord, a feature that will assist in making the tight wraps of ...


4

An alternative to @BenCrowell's answer would be to rappel like you would on a multi-pitch route. You will be rappelling on single bolts, so you should know how to judge their quality: (Tell the belayer to put a knot into the end of the rope, if not done yet.) Rappel down from the next bolt until you reach a lower one where the rope would be long enough. ...


4

Coming from a climbing background, I would propose the following: Tie the cord/rope into a loop, for example using the One-sided overhand bend or the double fisherman's knot Secure it around the pole using a Prusik knot. Note that the english wikipedia entry is only about climbing; the german version also mentions that this friction knot can be used e.g. ...


4

Yes there is. Soak the rope, then hang one end of the rope from a high point, and put a plumb bob on the other end. A plumb bob is just a fancy weight, you can use anything with some weight to pull the rope straight. Let the rope hang until it's dry. It will be mostly straight at that point, but it will never be perfect.


4

The thing that immediately jumps to mind for this is a retractable washing line, which should have enough length for what you want. However, they are relatively heavy and aren't exactly thin twine. Another option may be a automatic fishing real. However, its probably not long enough for what you want.


4

In addition to @ShemSeger's answer, there exists another minor difference that is also visible in his images: On the red webbing, there are three white threads. Each of these threads stands for 5kN of strength. All climbing webbing that I know has this kind of marking, though often in a different color. At first glance, this might seen to conflict with the ...


4

Two answers: If you are climbing toprope, then you connect the rope via locking carabiner to your belay loop. You do not have to expect high forces. If you are leading you should tie the rope directly to the tie in loops. When falling in a lead you have to expect much higher forces than when toproping. They can relatively easily exceed the crossloading ...



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