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13

Static ropes are used whenever you're working with a static load, either raising or lowering. Dynamic ropes should be used whenever there is potential for a fall and high impact forces. Static ropes are used for rappelling/abseiling, ascending, hauling, rescue work and making anchors (accessory cord). Pretty much they are to be used in every situation ...


12

Masons Line Paracord's biggest selling point is that it's strong enough to hold your body weight. That's great and all, but honestly, it's very rare to get caught in a situation where you're forced to use a rappel. The most common situation is when parachuters get caught in trees, but in those situations, you already have a bunch of lengths of paracord ...


12

If you're not a climber, then don't buy a climbing rope for doing roof repairs. If you're going to buy a rope for a very specific job, then you should get the right equipment for the job. For about the same cost as a climbing rope you could get a full roofers kit that comes with a: 5 point safety harness 50ft lifeline anchor plate 3' shock absorbing ...


10

You can buy specialist markers. They're designed to not impact the rope strength. Always use a sepecially designed rope marker as there is a comprehensive list of things to keep away from your rope and marker pen is one of them. The solvents can break down the nylon rope fibres making your rope potentially unsafe.


10

It isn't that unusual to use 8mm rope in caving on vertical (at least in Europe) especially in deeper caves with more rope to carry down and of course, back out again. In the US cavers tend to rig pitches from a single anchor and take care that there are no sharp bits of rock the rope could come in contact with and use rope which is more abrasion-resistant. ...


8

Leaving a sling behind is not as wasteful as you might think - a sling that has been rappelled off (without a 'biner or ring) must be retired anyway. In the scheme of the cost of recreational activity a few slings and rings add up to a minimal cost. Within reason, waste is not a reason to avoid leaving gear behind. There's a couple of things you can do to ...


8

Yes, it is accepted practice to wash new Semi-Static rope (or Single Rope Technique/SRT Rope as it is known by cavers). There are two reasons why new ropes are best washed before use. Washing removes the anti-static lubricants used in manufacture and also shrinks the rope. This serves to compact the sheath and tighten it onto the core, stabilising ...


8

I would use a dyneema rope as a lightweight hauling rope, rap line, or rescue rope, but I would never use any kind of static rope to catch a fall, this would include a fall into a crevasse, or a slip on a slope. With static ropes there is nearly zero energy absorption, I image this is even more true with dyneema. In the event of a fall during glacier ...


7

Firstly, the technique you describe is actually called "Moving together" at least by British climbers. The technique is used to move rapidly on relatively easy ground while also providing a degree of protection from falls. It is also used to rope up while crossing glaciers. This website has a good set of photos showing how to attach the rope to your harness ...


7

No matter what, try not to use the spray-paints at all. Considering that fact that most of the spraypaint and allied products contain solvents/chemicals like CCl4, Acetone, Methyl ethyl ketone, Ethylbenzene, Butoxyethanol and Xylene, etc. If I were you, I would not use it on my ropes for that matter. Dedicated Rope Markers : Spend some bucks and get a rope ...


7

As Freedom of the Hills also states: "Mechanical ascenders are stronger, safer, faster, and less tiring." – Freedom of the Hills The key advantage in there being, "less tiring", yes you could save a couple hundred grams by not carrying ascenders and instead using some prusiks, but how much do those weight savings benefit you after you've ascended ...


7

Yes, it does get left behind. Descending ring are meant to be used to facilitate the recovery of ropes, they save your rope from getting horribly dirty, damaged, or stuck, and leave much less of an impact than rappelling off of a tree or branch. Pulling you rope off of a tree will saw into the trunk and leave permanent scars, it could even possibly lead ...


7

Back in the bad old days, people used chocks for protection. These chocks or aluminum wedges came in many different sizes and each size had a different diameter hole in it. You bought the cord and chock separately, and tied the perlon cord in a sling using a fisherman's knot. Today, almost all chocks come with wire slings already installed. But ...


7

Knots by Grog say: If you are asked to learn to tie the Sheepshank, please request your Troop Leader to eliminate this knot and replace it with something safe and useful, e.g., the Alpine Butterfly Loop is an excellent way of creating a loop in the middle of a length of rope and can also be safely used to shorten a rope. So it sounds like you ...


7

There are many phrases that you will find concerning dry treatment of ropes, but they can all be easily related to your three categories: non-dry rope This rope has no treatment to repel water. Consequently it absorbs the most water and thus getting heavier. Wet ropes also loose some of their dynamic properties, so falls will get harder. As it is the ...


6

Out of all the products that are out there for climbing, Dyneema is considered to be the most abrasion resistant. That means that it is the least likely to be cut on a sharp edge, in fact Dyneema is used to make cut-resistant gloves, but that does not mean it's impossible to cut. Dyneema Properties Whether or not your sling would be cut by a rock edge ...


6

Slippery versions of knots/hitches are very useful in many applications, but have limited use in climbing. But there is one application for which I often use a slippery overhand knot. In Sport climbing When I'm cleaning a sport route and need to rappel, I'll tie a slip knot in the rope (before I untie myself from the rope) and clip it to my harness so that ...


6

How would you do this safely (is this even possible to do safely)? This technique is based on one member of the party being more competent than the others and the grades being very low (probably nothing more than a Grade III scramble) For example I lead a group of friends up Tryfan. This is a grade I scramble. I took a rope. I was confident soloing any ...


6

While there are slightly different needs (on your roof you are likely to get more friction against edges than a climber) for most purposes you can use perfectly normal climbing ropes, and a standard figure eight knot to connect to your harness. However - you should be equally as interested in how you will use the rope. Do you have an experienced belayer? ...


5

A dynamic rope that sustains a fall factor that high should definitely be retired, even if it doesn't show any immediate signs of damage. A dynamic rope is designed to elongate (dynamic elongation of 30-40%) in order to adsorb the shock of such a high-force fall. By doing so it lowers the forces applied to your gear and your body (keeping gear from ripping ...


5

You probably want your tool to have a longer extension, more like 100 cm. If this length bothers you, consider using an extendable bungee cord (e.g. 80 cm long, which you can stretch to 100 cm); twist it so it compacts itself when retracted. It might be possible to use a spiral/telephone cord, however it may be too bulky (I have seen it used for ice axes, ...


5

Nylon is great for climbing ropes, but it's sub-optimal for lashing and repair since it stretches so much under load. If you are going to carry string, carry polyester braided cord. It's just as strong but stretches much less. This is all I could find on the web quickly: Cabela's Northern Flightâ„¢ Braided Decoy Cord It's 2mm cord with a 450lb breaking ...


5

I think it was polypropylene, it was that cheap, hard, twisted stuff sold in hardware stores for general utility You may find a larger hardware store sells a wider quality spectrum of plastic-based ropes. Your best bet will be to browse stores until you find something that seems well-made, at a price you're willing to pay. Hemp rope is an old classic, ...


5

What are the differences? The different ropes basically differ by how they have been treated to handle water: non-dry ropes (although I've never seen that mentioned explicitly) have no special treatment at all, dry ropes have only the sheath, treated with some water-repellant, while dry core ones also have a treatment for the core. In both latter cases, the ...


4

Yes, that book is quite odd being aimed to beginners, so it should at least explicitly give some more information about that. That being said. If you want to do that, here's one way to (there are several). I did this in the past to help a party of less experienced people cross a slope full of unstable snow. First, get a lightweight rope. It does not have ...


4

They shrink, apparently. See precautions here. http://www.bealplanet.com/notices/2007/index.php?id=302&lang=us Before first use, soak the rope and leave to dry slowly. It will shrink by about 5 %. Take this into account when calculating required lengths. And first use means just that : The very first time the rope is used.


4

Aside from the slip hitch*, you can also use a girth hitch or clove hitch to sling a chicken head (or similar protrusion). The slip hitch will place only a single strand around the object, which may be helpful if space is limited or if you need the additional length. It's very easy to remember and tie, although with practice a clove hitch can also be ...


4

Your equipment should all come with a Kn rating. this is the force that that piece of gear will hold (often in what direction). So looking at a standard carabiner: This will hold 25Kn when loaded correctly (from the base to the top) 9Kn when loaded correctly but with the gate open and 7Kn when loaded incorrectly (though the screw gate) All pieces of ...


4

Do not use this cordelette for your protections: Knots will slip so the connection of the cordelette ends to form a ring will fail under load. Only use sewed Dyneema slings. Still Dyneema cordelettes are often used for climbing as they are much lighter for the same strength than nylon based ones. To know how this is possible despite the problem mentioned we ...


4

Coming from a climbing background, I would propose the following: Tie the cord/rope into a loop, for example using the One-sided overhand bend or the double fisherman's knot Secure it around the pole using a Prusik knot. Note that the english wikipedia entry is only about climbing; the german version also mentions that this friction knot can be used e.g. ...



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