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2

Nylon is great for climbing ropes, but it's sub-optimal for lashing and repair since it stretches so much under load. If you are going to carry string, carry polyester braided cord. It's just as strong but stretches much less. This is all I could find on the web quickly: Cabela's Northern Flightâ„¢ Braided Decoy Cord It's 2mm cord with a 450lb breaking ...


12

Masons Line Paracord's biggest selling point is that it's strong enough to hold your body weight. That's great and all, but honestly, it's very rare to get caught in a situation where you're forced to use a rappel. The most common situation is when parachuters get caught in trees, but in those situations, you already have a bunch of lengths of paracord ...


1

Thinner diameter ropes such as these have a wide range of uses but are not primarily designed for climbing. See this description from Sterling Ropes: These smaller cords can be used in a wide range of applications from tie-down straps to braided braclets and any other non-life-safety applications. (emphasis mine) The main point is they are not ...


6

Back in the bad old days, people used chocks for protection. These chocks or aluminum wedges came in many different sizes and each size had a different diameter hole it. You bought the cord and chock separately, and tied the perlon cord in a sling using a fisherman's knot. Today, almost all chocks come with wire slings already installed. But ...


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I think it was polypropylene, it was that cheap, hard, twisted stuff sold in hardware stores for general utility You may find a larger hardware store sells a wider quality spectrum of plastic-based ropes. Your best bet will be to browse stores until you find something that seems well-made, at a price you're willing to pay. Hemp rope is an old classic, ...



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