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11

The whole topic of sports equipment, sports health, and sports injuries is one in which the scientific quality of most of the information tends to be extremely poor. However, there is a group at Harvard that does research on barefoot running, and they have a web page with a lot of good information on it. As far as I've seen from browsing through their ...


9

Blisters are caused by friction. Your skin is not very slippery. Applying moleskin and duct-tape over a "hot-spot" adds a protective layer between your skin and shoe. Thus as your shoe slides, it rubs against the tape or mole-skin instead of your skin. Pointers: Use enough tape/mole-skin to cover an area larger than the hot-spot. If the hotspot is on the ...


8

Ben Crowell already answered the "why minimalist" angle better than I could have, but he didn't specifically talk about Vibram FiveFingers (hereafter VFF). This is intended to complement his answer. Generic pros of minimalist footware Little or no heel drop. As with other (true) "minimalist" footwear the VFF have little or no heel drop. This works with ...


8

It's less about the type of shoe, but how your run in it. Minimalist running shoes should not "wear out" in the traditional sense since they have little or no padding to compress. Because many are just soles, then running until that sole is gone is perfectly fine. It is important to note that the reason they don't have (or need) that cushion is because ...


7

For snowier conditions, it is common in the ultra community to take an old pair of shoes and screw in a number of metal hex screws into the sole from the bottom leaving enough of the screw proud to stick into the snow. I've never had to try it myself but I'm reliably informed it works a treat.


6

Australian cattle dog or other types of working dogs. Mine loves backpacking. Cattle dogs have very high energy levels and are bred to travel long distances. Excellent for trail running and hiking long distances. They can carry their own food/water and will do so without whining or stopping (working mentality). They have a very active mind and are very ...


6

Somehow, I can't see a Corgi keeping up. I have a 20-pound terrier mutt. She does great with me trail running at distances of 6-7 miles. After we get home, she runs around the back yard in circles like a rocket. Dogs are just much more efficient runners than humans, especially in cool weather. As far as I can tell, humans only seem to be at all ...


5

This is actually very simple. You use them as both a cushioning material and a way to prevent your shoe rubbing on your skin. If you have a problem area, products such as Compeed cushions, mole skin etc work really well, but in an emergency duct tape should work just fine. Just stick them over the area, making sure the edges don't catch on anything in ...


5

So, like I said, I'm not a great expert on using duct tape and moleskin. I'm writing an answer because someone specifically asked. :) My experiences: First off - applying duct tape or moleskin to your feet is a skill you develop through trial and error. Make sure that you learn to do it BEFORE going on a major expedition. Whenever I have a big hiking ...


5

As stated by Graham in his comment, I would recommend using ice traction device like this one or this one. It will provide you with the missing grip in winter. You should definitely keep using your running shoes because they are still better suited for running even in winter conditions.


4

Factors you can't easily control Some factors that you can't easily control play a clear role. These include genetics, being overweight,[Theisen] or having a previous injury. For example, people who want to lose weight may run in order to burn calories; they can't necessarily lose the weight before they start running so as to reduce their chance of getting ...


4

I'd need to know a bit more about your winter hiking conditions and duration. If you're erring on the side of active, I'd suggest a Labrador. If you're doing colder and shorter, something like a Bernesse Mountain Dog would do amazing. I love running with my Labrador since she can handle heat decently (I don't run with her when it's very hot), she's handle ...


4

Just keep climbing-is sort of the right answer, but you need to fit it in to your training and recovery schedule. I kept climbing all the way through training for various marathons. My solution was to do a climb a week in place of one of my small to medium sized runs. If this happened to be right after a really long run then I might focus more on ...


4

For that matter why don't you get a Jogger Shoe for you? When I had been to a running exped, I was told to get shoes with following Props: Got to have a double inner sole. (This implies that you get a shoe of size which is slightly bigger than you normal shoe size). This help you to expand and contract the skin, muscles of feet. Make sure that they are ...


4

I just bought the 310xt, because it stores a lot of data (does everything you want, but doesn't have a barometric altimeter, just gps altitude). I am very happy with it. Because it is slightly older, the price is very reasonable. Many more expensive watches are a bit smaller, but they have a battery that lasts only 8h when new, the 310xt has ample reserve. ...


3

Make sure the problem is in the shoes first. First, if you run on asphalt, try running on dirt trails. They are softer and provide much less shock to your joints. Second, make sure your running technic is correct. I would recommend the book from a world champion Gordon Pirie, which is very understandable by a non-professional runner. One basic idea from ...


3

You're framing this as a question of "how much will this hurt my climbing"? I wonder if you could use this down time from actual climbing as a chance to focus more on pure climbing specific strength training, and possibly come out of the whole process a stronger climber. Something I tend to do is all but quit route climbing in the winter, and take it up ...


3

What sort of snow conditions are you running in? For dry, powdery snow, the best option is a pair running shoes that have aggressive tread (search for "trail running shoes"), but in wet, icy snow, metal screws or spikes will give you the extra grip you're looking for. I can't think of anything that will help more than it will hurt on icy pavement other than ...


3

Icebug specializes in shoes made for running on ice or other very slippery surfaces.


3

I agree with the fact that as the sole of the shoe gets thinner it becomes harder. Which would be awkward for running purposes. It also depends on how you land. If you land on the ball of your foot (if you don't, you should), the layer at the sole at the heels remain flexible for, to be more precise, compressible, which is required. The reason I am saying ...


2

The wolf, the wild ancestor of the dog, has extreme running endurance. According to this article, many wolfs travel more than 50 miles daily searching for food. I've read somewhere, that wolfs can chase moose for a few days, but I can't find that now. Wolf is very similar to us in that domain, human hunters can also run for days. This can be another reason ...


1

I found this while shopping for a new pair and I figured I'd give my input. I left my Bikilas at my parent's house so figured I'd treat myself to a new pair. First off, to answer this: I wish I could feel all the rocks under my feet. Vibrams will accomplish this. Barefoot will accomplish this even more, but it really does a beating on your feet. I ...



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