Hot answers tagged

24

You should run There's a good video from MinutePhysics that explains it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MqYE2UuN24 The short(er) version is that the amount of water you "run into" depends only on the distance, which is equal whether you run or walk. But the water falling on top of your head depends on how long you stay in the rain, and you can ...


20

You should walk. I have seen (and had) many 'accidents' from running in the rain - who hasn't? Although in theory running will keep you drier, there are more important things that staying dry. Running for the sake of staying drier is often done with little thought to the surroundings and potential consequences. You become goal focused - telling you ...


16

Theoretically, run. Practically, slowly jog or briskly walk so that you don't slip and fall. The TV series MythBusters initially tested this with artificial rain and found that walking was better due to less surface area in the rain. However, after revisiting in actual rain, they found that running was better. Also, Lifehacker summed it up nicely: the ...


12

The whole topic of sports equipment, sports health, and sports injuries is one in which the scientific quality of most of the information tends to be extremely poor. However, there is a group at Harvard that does research on barefoot running, and they have a web page with a lot of good information on it. As far as I've seen from browsing through their ...


12

Breath through your teeth, that's what we'd do when cycling in NW Ontario, the bugs are horrible there year round. I've inhaled more than one mosquito in my life time, now I just grit my teeth and put on a psycho smile if I'm breathing hard while moving fast through bugs. Of course this method doesn't prevent bugs from getting in your teeth, so you have to ...


11

Factors you can't easily control Some factors that you can't easily control play a clear role. These include genetics, being overweight,[Theisen] or having a previous injury. For example, people who want to lose weight may run in order to burn calories; they can't necessarily lose the weight before they start running so as to reduce their chance of getting ...


10

Blisters are caused by friction. Your skin is not very slippery. Applying moleskin and duct-tape over a "hot-spot" adds a protective layer between your skin and shoe. Thus as your shoe slides, it rubs against the tape or mole-skin instead of your skin. Pointers: Use enough tape/mole-skin to cover an area larger than the hot-spot. If the hotspot is on the ...


9

Ben Crowell already answered the "why minimalist" angle better than I could have, but he didn't specifically talk about Vibram FiveFingers (hereafter VFF). This is intended to complement his answer. Generic pros of minimalist footware Little or no heel drop. As with other (true) "minimalist" footwear the VFF have little or no heel drop. This works with ...


9

This will a bit of a more general answer because I don't run 10k but... Peak fitness is something you aim to hit at a certain point in time and is not something that can be maintained for a great period of time. Expecting to perform your best every time will likely lead you to be disappointed. That's not to say you're not capable of running 10k faster than ...


9

It's when you're moving quickly and quietly along the trail that you're most likely to encounter a bear in the Rockies, and that's because they're easier to sneak up on that way. I run into more bears when I'm on my mountain bike than when I'm hiking. Large predators use trails as often as people do. If you're not making enough noises to identify yourself ...


9

I think the main difference is probably in British vs American (/rest of the world) English. Fell is a particularly British term referring to areas such as the Lake district that does not really have a direct equivalent in many other places. Following from this in the UK there is the Fell runners association, whereas in the US the equivalent would be the ...


9

In cold weather, I'm the guy that always has way more layers on than everyone else. I don't let myself sweat though, I just suck at retaining body heat. Sweating is the primary reason for not over-layering, but aside from hypothermia the only real danger presented from excessive sweating is dehydration. Sweating uses up fluids, and if you're not replenishing ...


8

You could wear a mosquito net: Not clear how this is going to affect your running though...


8

It's less about the type of shoe, but how your run in it. Minimalist running shoes should not "wear out" in the traditional sense since they have little or no padding to compress. Because many are just soles, then running until that sole is gone is perfectly fine. It is important to note that the reason they don't have (or need) that cushion is because ...


8

I'd need to know a bit more about your winter hiking conditions and duration. If you're erring on the side of active, I'd suggest a Labrador. If you're doing colder and shorter, something like a Bernesse Mountain Dog would do amazing. I love running with my Labrador since she can handle heat decently (I don't run with her when it's very hot), she can ...


7

For snowier conditions, it is common in the ultra community to take an old pair of shoes and screw in a number of metal hex screws into the sole from the bottom leaving enough of the screw proud to stick into the snow. I've never had to try it myself but I'm reliably informed it works a treat.


7

Somehow, I can't see a Corgi keeping up. I have a 20-pound terrier mutt. She does great with me trail running at distances of 6-7 miles. After we get home, she runs around the back yard in circles like a rocket. Dogs are just much more efficient runners than humans, especially in cool weather. As far as I can tell, humans only seem to be at all ...


7

It also depends on your type of clothes. Wearing "non breathable" clothes will get you more sweaty than the rain will get you wet sometimes. Also if you wear a coat but no rainproof trousers, than running will probably get your trousers more wet, because of surface area increase. I think the best tactic can be seen by observing people in rain: Those ...


6

Australian cattle dog or other types of working dogs. Mine loves backpacking. Cattle dogs have very high energy levels and are bred to travel long distances. Excellent for trail running and hiking long distances. They can carry their own food/water and will do so without whining or stopping (working mentality). They have a very active mind and are very ...


6

So, like I said, I'm not a great expert on using duct tape and moleskin. I'm writing an answer because someone specifically asked. :) My experiences: First off - applying duct tape or moleskin to your feet is a skill you develop through trial and error. Make sure that you learn to do it BEFORE going on a major expedition. Whenever I have a big hiking ...


6

It depends on the amount of rain and on the surface you are running/walking on. Now, there is unquestionably a threshold where the amount of rain makes the time exposure factor so significant that running wins without any doubt. However for lighter rain there might be another factor that turns the result. I remember reading a news paper article about ...


5

You could try a running mask — Google > "Running Face Masks" Face masks are commonly worn by bicyclists and runners in the winter, but lighter-weight materials are available for runners concerned about inhaling dust and other pollutants. They are perfectly suited to keeping the bugs out.


5

If you can only run 2x a week and only have limited time, then running 10k as fast as you can is a reasonable training plan. However, you will rapidly reach a plateaux and see no improvement in results. The long slow runs need to be for times and distances that are generally 2-3x the length of your event. ( At least for events less than an hour. ) Serious ...


5

I'm not an expert, however I can give you general direction. The reason why you want run slower to run faster is for one: less risk of injury and second: training to stay in aerobic zone, avoiding going to anaerobic zone and build endurance in the end. When you exercise, first you are well rested and your body receives enough oxygen. This means all ...


5

As stated by Graham in his comment, I would recommend using ice traction device like this one or this one. It will provide you with the missing grip in winter. You should definitely keep using your running shoes because they are still better suited for running even in winter conditions.


5

This is actually very simple. You use them as both a cushioning material and a way to prevent your shoe rubbing on your skin. If you have a problem area, products such as Compeed cushions, mole skin etc work really well, but in an emergency duct tape should work just fine. Just stick them over the area, making sure the edges don't catch on anything in ...


5

Having spent a lot of time running and walking in the rain I can say from experience that it's very much an individual specific choice. Personally I like to keep my body temperature up as I find it difficult to do so whilst walking; so I have to run. I'm reasonably fit so can run for an hour if need be, but others might not be, and for them it could be ...


5

Too many layers => Sweating Sweating => Wet clothing (and plenty of it, here) Wet Clothing + Wind => Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling => Cold Body Cold Body (and no dry layers left) => Hypothermia Hypothermia => Death I know that's all bit of a leap, but if you had a problem our running in remote country and had to wait for rescue, having all your ...


4

Just keep climbing-is sort of the right answer, but you need to fit it in to your training and recovery schedule. I kept climbing all the way through training for various marathons. My solution was to do a climb a week in place of one of my small to medium sized runs. If this happened to be right after a really long run then I might focus more on ...


4

What sort of snow conditions are you running in? For dry, powdery snow, the best option is a pair running shoes that have aggressive tread (search for "trail running shoes"), but in wet, icy snow, metal screws or spikes will give you the extra grip you're looking for. I can't think of anything that will help more than it will hurt on icy pavement other than ...



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