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24

You should run There's a good video from MinutePhysics that explains it all: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MqYE2UuN24 The short(er) version is that the amount of water you "run into" depends only on the distance, which is equal whether you run or walk. But the water falling on top of your head depends on how long you stay in the rain, and you can ...


20

You should walk. I have seen (and had) many 'accidents' from running in the rain - who hasn't? Although in theory running will keep you drier, there are more important things that staying dry. Running for the sake of staying drier is often done with little thought to the surroundings and potential consequences. You become goal focused - telling you ...


16

Theoretically, run. Practically, slowly jog or briskly walk so that you don't slip and fall. The TV series MythBusters initially tested this with artificial rain and found that walking was better due to less surface area in the rain. However, after revisiting in actual rain, they found that running was better. Also, Lifehacker summed it up nicely: the ...


9

I think the main difference is probably in British vs American (/rest of the world) English. Fell is a particularly British term referring to areas such as the Lake district that does not really have a direct equivalent in many other places. Following from this in the UK there is the Fell runners association, whereas in the US the equivalent would be the ...


9

It's when you're moving quickly and quietly along the trail that you're most likely to encounter a bear in the Rockies, and that's because they're easier to sneak up on that way. I run into more bears when I'm on my mountain bike than when I'm hiking. Large predators use trails as often as people do. If you're not making enough noises to identify yourself ...


9

In cold weather, I'm the guy that always has way more layers on than everyone else. I don't let myself sweat though, I just suck at retaining body heat. Sweating is the primary reason for not over-layering, but aside from hypothermia the only real danger presented from excessive sweating is dehydration. Sweating uses up fluids, and if you're not replenishing ...


7

It also depends on your type of clothes. Wearing "non breathable" clothes will get you more sweaty than the rain will get you wet sometimes. Also if you wear a coat but no rainproof trousers, than running will probably get your trousers more wet, because of surface area increase. I think the best tactic can be seen by observing people in rain: Those ...


6

It depends on the amount of rain and on the surface you are running/walking on. Now, there is unquestionably a threshold where the amount of rain makes the time exposure factor so significant that running wins without any doubt. However for lighter rain there might be another factor that turns the result. I remember reading a news paper article about ...


5

Having spent a lot of time running and walking in the rain I can say from experience that it's very much an individual specific choice. Personally I like to keep my body temperature up as I find it difficult to do so whilst walking; so I have to run. I'm reasonably fit so can run for an hour if need be, but others might not be, and for them it could be ...


5

Too many layers => Sweating Sweating => Wet clothing (and plenty of it, here) Wet Clothing + Wind => Evaporative Cooling Evaporative Cooling => Cold Body Cold Body (and no dry layers left) => Hypothermia Hypothermia => Death I know that's all bit of a leap, but if you had a problem our running in remote country and had to wait for rescue, having all your ...


4

Oh goodness, this is a terrible struggle in caves especially, because there is no air current and the breath just lingers forever in front of your face. It's especially bad when I'm trying to film the cave with my gopro, and have a persistent could looming in front of my head cam. There are three things you can do while wearing a headlamp: Consciously ...


3

If you assume that both methods are about as effective, Then another parameter comes into place: If it rains very little it might be worth running, before it starts to rain more. If it rains alot, then you might want to maximize the possibility of if clearing up, i.e. walk slowly. (Or just wait in cover)


3

I would suggest for you to attach some kind of small bells or something that will produce noise, on the shoes, hands, and your belt. Mobile would not be recomended because battery might die on your trip. So every time you run it will signal every one in the nature, HERE I AM. After some time you will not notice the sounds.


3

The solution is to invest in an actual pair of trail running shoes, they are stiffer, and snugger, and compensate for all of the issue that you're having with your road runners there. I have a pair of asics trail runners: asics gel fuji trabuco 3 They have a surprisingly stiff sole, they are snug even when not laced, and are extremely stable. I also ...


1

Trail runners, cross trainers, and court (tennis) shoes have better side support that will help prevent this.



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