Hot answers tagged

10

A number of prominent climbing organizations (e.g. International Federation of Sport Climbing) either recommend or require two locking carabiners for clip-in attachment to a harness, e.g. IFSC Rules 2015 [1MB DOC] 8.3.5 The climbing rope shall be connected to the competitor's harness by two Screwgate or Self-Locking Karabiners arranged in opposition ...


10

Yes! Not a silly question at all and surprisingly easy to answer: yes! There are even sound-systems exactly for that use. Try sound. Sound can have an excellent impact on a coyote that has wandered into your yard or campsite. Try banging trash can lids or anything else that is noisy to scare the coyote off. Yell and make a lot of noise ...


8

Carabiners always attach to the belay loop. Attaching carabiners to the tie-in-points causes them to get loaded incorrectly. Carabiners are designed to load the spine, which is the side opposite the gate. Attaching a carabiner to the tie-in-points causes the gate to be loaded, since three strands get loaded (the tie-in loops and the rope end). An ...


8

Climbing next to a road is, in general, not a pleasant experience. Any roadside rock face is artificially shaped by the excavation that created it. The rock can be more likely to crumble under you as you climb than naturally exposed rock, and it is likely to be dirty from dust kicked up by passing traffic. You may think that dirt is a silly complaint, but it ...


4

Your main concern here is going to be shock loading. Nuts are typically tested to resist static compression load. Any shock is typically adsorbed by the rope and other equipment, so they get the mimimum shock load when/if you fall. If they don't fit well and are loose (or are just passed though a hole and are therefore moving around all over the place) then ...


4

Two answers: If you are climbing toprope, then you connect the rope via locking carabiner to your belay loop. You do not have to expect high forces. If you are leading you should tie the rope directly to the tie in loops. When falling in a lead you have to expect much higher forces than when toproping. They can relatively easily exceed the crossloading ...


4

Diving is first and foremost a PRACTICAL skill so the best way to practise is to do it. Yes you can read through the books to refresh your theory, but this will not refresh your ability to dive. But it can be helpful in reminding you about small things you may have forgotten. Practising hand signals can be good, but these we always confirm before dives as ...


3

Response for the question #1: I grew up in an area filled with Prairie Rattlesnakes and in grade school we were taught the following. It always worked for me and during summer vacation it was common to come across a rattler every day. Before reading the steps please be warned that the Prairie Rattlesnake is known to be less aggressive and wants to flee ...


3

As far as I am aware there are no obligatory guidelines on belaying in climbing. Manufacturers, climbing associations and climbing businesses establish their own rules/recommendations, sometimes trying to get them applied universally. Of course these rules are not completely independent, but are based on past experiences (accidents) and commonly accepted ...


2

Rattlesnakes will generally only strike when provoked. That is the very reason we hear them rattle. Keep in mind a rattler cannot produce more venom quickly, so they too prefer to flee rather than bite. Young snake tend to be more aggressive and do not know how to control their venom. If you hear one close to you, back away slowly. Once far enough away they ...


2

It's not necessary, but neither is using two non-lockers really. People usually use two carabiners because they will bend the rope less sharply, reducing friction when loaded (also reducing wear on the biners). This is very common in top roping, when the climber is expecting to be lowered. I suspect the person that setup the anchor in the picture wanted ...


2

I have no special knowledge of this subject but it is my understanding that rock cut by blasting fractures deeply, beyond the part that is removed, and that as a result climbing on such rock is typically not safe as entire blocks are liable to come loose. A bolt is worse than no good if it pulls a boulder down on top of you, and trad pro, especially cams, ...


1

It's not illegal in Montana, in fact the road side crags at Stonehill near Rexford Bench are some of the best, and most popular sport climbs in NW Montana (for Canadians at least): Roadside crags are what sport climbers live for, as long as there's enough room in the ditch to belay safely off of the road, then you're good to go.


1

I've never been to RMNP in the winter, so this is a wild guess. I'm assuming the higher elevation roads will all be closed. Look into how far you can drive up Fall River Road. If I remember right, it's about 10 miles long. The eastern 3/4 or so goes up a valley. While there is certainly elevation gain, it doesn't sound like what you are looking for. ...


1

Breathing technique is bar far the most important. Remember to keep your airways open at all times during descent and ascent, but most importantly during ascent. During normal dives you want to keep you ascent slower than the rising bubbles, while in a near continuous exhale, in deep dives you slow the ascent to half the speed of the air bubbles while ...


1

Besides the already given answers there is another pretty simple solution to your problem. Sometimes when I'm 3D shooting in the forest I - of course - want to hear the sound of nature. Also, I want to be able to hear other archers for safety reasons. That, however, doesn't prevent me from listening to silent background music! How, you ask? Bone ...



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