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11

Snow blindness is at best very painful. UV damage to your eyes is not something you want to play around with. If only 40% protection they are are not sunglasses, they are fashion accessories and offer no where near enough to protect your eyes for more than an hour. For $10 you will get glasses that provide 99% protection, why risk it?


10

As a kid we often went on hiking trips and I got my first knife when I was around eight to ten years old. Below are some of the things my parents looked out for when I was a child. Obviously this is addressed at an even younger age than OP described, so you might have to adapt it accordingly... General advice For beginners either get a fixed blade, or one ...


7

In the Ardennes there are at present 14 places. Nine of them are in the Viroinval-Chimay region (south of the provinces Namur-Hainaut) and five are in the Parc Naturel des Deux Ourthes in the Luxembourg province. A site that gives a very good overview of such places (for all of Belgium) is http://www.bivakzone.be (in Dutch). On this site you can also find ...


5

This answer is going into a slightly different direction than fgysin's one since I just noticed that your question is about activities, not technique itself. My suggestions might be obvious to some, but this is what I would teach (and how I learned handling knives): making a "spear" (or improvised trekking pole, if you prefer) from sticks, i.e. remove the ...


5

I'm pretty sure bears can distinguish fresh food from year old residues. Otherwise nothing you own could ever go into bear country. Our clothes, cell phones, wallets etc have all been to so many more restaurants than your average bear, yet bears almost never take this stuff. Additional evidence: finding old old french fries under the seat of my car after ...


3

The first thing you need to find out is how heavily crevassed the glacier is, and whether any crevasses are likely to be big enough to fall into. Crevasses can be hidden by snow, so people can fall into them unexpectedly. If you have reliable information that there are no crevasses big enough to fall into, then the use of ice axes and crampons is decided by ...


3

Many people travel for days or weeks in bear country. Several existing questions on this site address bear and camp/food related issues. If you've never traveled in areas with bears before, you should definitely give these a read: What are the proper precautions/protocols for storing food while car camping in an area with bears? What precautions should I ...


2

I bike to work here in Japan and sometimes I have to bike back late in the evening (coz of overtime). I live in a mountainous forrested area and there are many boar around (because there's few hunters here). In the past 5 years, boar have crossed my path about 6-7 times (always when it's dark) and they ran at really high speed (there is no way to even ...


2

Although always recommended, crampons and axes are only necessary for hiking on steep or slippery ice where there is fall potential or danger of sliding to the bottom of a slope and seriously injuring or killing yourself. If you're traveling along an easy, flat, or concave slope of a glacier, and you can manage in only your boots, then they aren't ...


2

I think part of the answer to your question relates to WHERE in the Rockies you'll be visiting. Will you be in an area that is not visited much by humans, or will you be visiting a high-traffic area such as a national park or other popular tourist destination? If you will be hiking through an area that has few or sporadic hikers, then you really have ...


2

If you've got bacon grease or donut glaze smeared on your tent floor, then you'd better wash it off before you head back to bear country. Otherwise, eating food in your tent now shouldn't affect it's flavor a year from now. Remember that food in your tent will draw other creatures to investigate the scent - such as mice and ants. Mice will certainly ...


1

This isn't a scientific evidence based answer, but I think that line should not be changing much, as it should have more to do with snow cover than temperature. This article on the history of snow fall in the Sierras, asserts that there has been no change in snowfall over 130 years despite a change in temperatures. This isn't too surprising as air carries ...


1

We have over 40 years of experience in black bear country, zero in Grizzly country. The black bear's nose is exquisitely sensitive to food that is here. We have frequently eaten in our tent in bad weather (but never cooked food or stored food or spilled food in the tent), and the tent has not been subsequently attractive to bears. Not sure how much detail ...


1

As safe as you make it. Don't fool yourself, bears are there, and they will attack you if they feel they are being threatened. The Canadian Rockies are wild and full of large predators, it's not not a zoo or game preserve, the danger is real. You must understand that you are in their territory, the most important thing to do is to properly educate yourself ...


1

Rectal infusion I have read of a case where people survived in a life raft not by drinking their own urine, but by rectally infusing urine through a tube. This is apparently quite a safe way to get your body to extracting the water in a fluid without absorbing all/too many of the potentially dangerous waste products. Turns out one of the survivors was a ...



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