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9

Advanced climbers only Climbing is inherently dangerous. Soloing is even more so. Please learn from experienced people and in person, not from Internet. So this answer mainly describes physical principles, supported by some experience that I have. Here is an excellent tutorial, by a climber more experienced than me, that explains the technique in much ...


7

The bare-minimum that I'd buy should have a 50 Newton. 50 Newton The guys I've known who do Surfing, Water-skiing, Kayaking, Water-sailing, Canoeing and all sorts of crazy water sports stuff, would go for a 50N rated aid. It also depends on how much are you going to bank on that, right? And, mainly this is applicable to all those who knows swimming or ...


7

50N refers to 50 newtons. This is the buoyancy force that the buoyancy aid provides (10N ~= 1kg). This site has some useful information on buoyancy aids and ratings. 50N is the pretty much the standard rating for things like kayaking or dinghy sailing, with the occasional higher rating (60/70N). However, note that they are not designed to self right and so ...


5

Warning: Yer Gonna Die For this answer I'll discuss the devices and considerations specific to lead soloing, rather than describe a particular technique. Available Devices There are very few devices on the market for roped solo lead climbing. Rock Exotica's Soloist device used a camming mechanism similar to that of Petzl's GriGri. (As mentioned, the ...


5

I'll preface this by saying I've never tried this in a real world application myself, but I was curious and found some instructions for creating quick harnesses out of webbing from a web search. I want to add that I am in no way endorsing this for climbing or prolonged use beyond a static hang or an emergency situation. I've heard and read that ...


5

The British Mountaineering Council (BMC) has a downloadable helmet guidebook which addresses this question pretty well. As a brief summary: Hardshell helmets give good protection against impacts from above, e.g. rock fall, and can cope with repeated small impacts. This makes them the most suitable type for mountaineering or long routes. However they give ...


4

This, probably more than any issue in climbing, has generated more discussion, heated debates, and vitriol (especially on the internet) than any other issue in climbing. Both sides (lower vs. rappel) are equally ardent in their belief that their way is the One True Way. Unfortunately, both sides are wrong. My rule is simple: Climber's choice. You should ...


3

Your options are limited and I think you've mentioned most of the only possibilities. Depending on where the belay is and presuming it's at ground level you could get your belayer to run backwards as you fall or jump down off a small rock to take in the slack quickly (you've already mentioned these). This will likely slow you decent a little at best and ...


1

There is a description of this in Freedom of the Hills, around p. 149 in the edition I have. They describe it as an emergency alternative to a manufactured harness. Peter Croft also suggests using them intentionally for lightweight climbing, if you don't think the climb requires a harness, but you will want to rappel at some point. The basic idea is to make ...


1

In addition to the other answers, a blog post by Andy Kirkpatrick (a leading proponent of the art of solo roped climbing) on his description of what he does, can be seen at http://www.andy-kirkpatrick.com/articles/view/rope_soloing_101_part_1


1

Does a best practices guide for climbing safely exist online? To learn safety you need a practical introduction by someone you're sure knows what they're talking about. Techniques can vary considerably between country and country and climbing techniques, e.g. it's common to use two half ropes in the UK. This is less common in other parts of the world. ...


1

Here are some resources I found: http://www.climbing.com/skill/rock-climbing-technique/ http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/stawamus/bp-guide-rock-route-dev.pdf http://www.indoorclimbing.com/Climbing_Technique.html The main reason people usually share best practices orally and in person is because the experienced climber can correct the ...


1

First I want to make clear, that I do not have professional medical training. Everything I am going to write down, I acquired by reading articles published by various high-altitude medicine societies. As the question is pretty broad, this answer will certainly not cover all involved aspects, but I will do my best to give some information. While Aspirin is ...



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