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18

I personally had a similar sort of a question when I first went through similar kind of stats about these mountains. Getting introduced with these stats is different than totally understanding the mountain and the pandora box it opens. For getting acquainted with the reasons for so many failed attempts, one needs to read tactical data and expedition reports. ...


17

It is safer to be inside the vehicle than out. The NOAA National Weather Service's lightning safety page recommends vehicles as a safe location during a thunderstorm: You are not safe anywhere outside. Run to a safe building or vehicle when you first hear thunder, see lightning or observe dark threatening clouds developing overhead. Stay inside until 30 ...


13

There are few things which may go wrong: Injury. Carry some kind of the shelter. It may take few hours for mountain rescue to get to your group. Tired. Make sure you have alternative shorter and simpler route in your head. Dehydrated. Carry a bit of extra water or a purification tablets to gather water from streams. Scared. Your rope can serve a good ...


12

Bear canisters should not be suspended. Doing so would make it possible for a bear to steal the canister and take it away. The shape of the canisters make it very challenging for a bear to hold or carry, and normally they will eventually give up and ditch the canister somewhere still close enough that you could find and retrieve it. If you have it hung, and ...


12

The first question you need to ask yourself is, do I absolutely need to move this patient. If somebody is too injured to walk out themselves, you want to avoid moving them without proper equipment if at all possible. If there's any chance of a properly equipped rescue team arriving in the same amount of time (or even more time than) it would take you to get ...


11

The effects of drinking distilled, deminieralized, deionized, and many other forms of water purification have been thoroughly studied and despite the research, the jury is still out on the subject, with regards to temporary usage. As far as adventuring goes, it appears it does not matter, as long as the water you are drinking is microbiologically and ...


11

A trek group should have a Leader who walks in front who leads the trail/route/climb, sometimes cleaning the route or navigating the route. I believe that will be you. Then the second most important person is the Back Lead, who is the last head you have, who makes sure that the pace of the group is maintained and adapted as per the slowest member. You'll ...


11

How can I practice specifically for traverses? A lot of climbing gyms (especially bouldering ones) have traversing walls. If you can find one of these practice there. Or find a boulder that you can circuit climb (climb in a circle around the bottom). How should I go about a traverse with Undercut holds specifically? Generally the trick to ...


10

This is sadly a very persistent myth that has been around rock climbing for far too long. Black Diamond says that as long as the gate action is fine and there is no major structural damage, the gear is fine. As a side note, the fact that this group decided their gear was unfit to climb on, yet felt okay selling it to someone else who would climb on it, ...


9

You can take it back to REI or to another gear store that deals with climbing gear. Make sure they know the rope is indeed being used for climbing. They should be able to cut it and prepare the cut ends so there isn't any fraying/unraveling, etc.


9

It is safe to cut (while you are not using it). You can cut it yourself. I would use something sharp so that you get a clean cut. Healing (using a flame to melt) the cut ends and wrapping them in tape (like they come from the manufacture) will be needed. Before you do that though, you might want to consider not cutting it at all. While a 70 meter rope is ...


9

American black bears They are somewhat common in some wilderness areas of California, mostly in the mountains. In their natural state, black bears are thinly populated on the landscape because it takes a large area to support one, and they are also shy of humans. Black bears are not very large; females can be the size of a large dog. There are certain ...


9

Advanced climbers only Climbing is inherently dangerous. Soloing is even more so. Please learn from experienced people and in person, not from Internet. So this answer mainly describes physical principles, supported by some experience that I have. Here is an excellent tutorial, by a climber more experienced than me, that explains the technique in much ...


8

As for the reason why it is risky: You cannot know if the guy you want to help has any disease that can be transferred via blood contact, such as HIV or Hepatitis. Already small wounds in your own skin –you might not recognize it as a wound at all– might be enough to transfer the disease, therefore it would be quite risky to just stick your hand into any ...


8

I would say there is no point in walking briskly. With a heavy backpack, it's a no-no for me. I have observed and have struggled with the same problem when I started off towards some serious trekking with genuinely elevated/steep climbs with a heavy haversack on my back. The sack that I usually carry weighs about 18 kg. People who are advising you to walk ...


8

Welcome to outdoors.SE! Older buildings often contain asbestos in solid form, and it may be sealed up (under floorboards, in tape around heating ducts, etc.). As long as it's not ground up into dust, the hazard is minimal. For example, construction workers knocking down a building or remodeling it can get exposed to asbestos dust if they don't realize that ...


8

This is a perfectly legitimate thing to do. It's not uncommon for climbers to take a 60 or 70 meter rope and cut a few meters off the ends (since the ends of a rope take a lot of abuse). You can either take it to REI, as you suggested, and tell them you are cutting it for climbing or check out this how-to on Climbing.com. A few things you need to consider ...


8

Ice screws have a tendency for pressure melting if constantly loaded over some time. Therefore if you build your fixed point belay system and and keep it under more or less constant load while belaying your partner, the screw might start to migrate as the ice below it melts slowly and refreezes above the screw. By this, a screw that was close to bomb-proof ...


8

With due respect to Ben Crowell, who is I believe a far more experienced outdoorsman than I am, I beg to differ with his answer. (Edit: prior to revision that is.) Having worked at a very small climbing wall I have seen tough ropes completely worn out by top-rope climbing alone, therefore at least in the extreme "Ropes don't become weak from top-roping or ...


8

The Problem with metallic equipment and cold temperatures is that your hands are moist, if you touch a very cold metallic surface (or any other smooth surface), your moisture will freeze to the surface which causes the top layer of your skin to get stuck on the surface. For Example: it's freezing cold outside and you put your tongue (which is very moist, ...


7

I don't think the question is really answerable more precisely than you already have, because there are so many variables: the original stretchiness of the rope you happen to have - every rope has a different force/elongation curve the age of the rope - ropes get less stretchy as they age the relative weight of you and your belayer the amount of slip the ...


7

I consider a couple of factors when it comes to dropped gear: Some equipment is pretty easy to inspect. A carabiner has one moving part (the gate, possibly a second, if it's a locker). Nuts and hexes have no moving parts.Cams on the other hand are not easily examined. Equipment like non-locking carabiners, nuts, hexes, cams are often redundant. If the ...


7

There's not yet a good answer that asks for the reason the fingers, toes (and nose and ears) are cold, so let me add a few points: (I'm assuming around 0°C according to the question - of course, -40 °C is different). Here are a couple of reasons why your fingers and toes get cold in the first place: Of course, you may not yet be used to the cold ...


7

The key to survival of any species in any part of the world is having a sustainable source of food. This applies to snakes as well. For snakes, humans are not food. For them, rats, lizards, scorpions, frogs etc act as food. When you specifically talk of snow covered areas, it is impossible for a snake to live. Or any cold blooded animal for that matter. I ...


7

As already said in WedaPashi's answer, the question in my personal experience is not so much about fast and slow. It is mainly about finding your own rhythm and walking speed that you can then sustain for long times. Whenever I go too fast, I come to a state where I have to take a rest, after some minutes I feel like "Oh, I'm fine again", start to walk ...


7

Distilled / deionized (as for lab purposes) water tastes stale. So do reverse-osmosis drinking water, and cooked water: this is attributed mainly to the lack of CO2 / HCO3⁻ compared to fresh ground / tap drinking water. Yes, you can encounter distilled water in outdoor situations. In winter it lies around on the ground as white powder... Lots of people ...


7

There's a discussion of this in Freedom of the Hills. The question refers to snow, but usually this is done on ice (or very hard snow). One reason would be if not everybody in the group has crampons. For example, mountain guides in East Africa usually can't afford crampons. Historically, the technique was developed before crampons were invented. Even if ...


7

Climbing Self Rescue: Improvising Solutions for Serious Situations This book presents self-rescue techniques in the first section. The latter half contains several dozen "what would you do" scenarios, allowing you to test what you've learned. It gives one or more solutions to each scenario, as well as highlighting things to watch out for. Most ...


7

Suppose I get to the top of a sport route ... and I want to ... end up with a top-rope setup. "Top-rope setup" implies that someone else is going to climb the same route after you get down, right? Can anyone lay out all the typical steps...? Hang a locking karabiner (or a pair of non-locking quickdraws) on the anchor Clip your rope into it ...


7

Being young, athletic, fit and having great conditions won't help you if you are missing experience in techniques/tactics required when going over glaciers. Kilimanjaro is a high altitude mountain, but it is technically easy. You don't have to touch a glacier there so it's not really a good reference. Therefore I would highly suggest to hire a guide at ...



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