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5

Depends where the hole is and how big it is, but: 1. First, determine if it's neccessary to try and patch the hole in open water. If you're close to shore, then go ashore and patch it there. If you're losing air faster than you could get back to shore, then you need to act quick. 2. Locate the the hole.If you can't find the hole, then you can't stop the ...


0

This isn't perfectly safe to swim in open-sea and should be organized. Some dangers - currents, stiffed legs, sea creatures, almost as on the beach and a wild beach could be really unsafe. The main countermeasures are - Still water and weather forecast, off course. Shark or other problems proof nets in the water, also keep people inside in most cases. ...


1

First of all wild boars have a bad sight, they just smell well and hear. Though personally I would say that to minor noise they don't react much. Therefore there is a need of decent noise if you do not want to meet them. Once you met - do not show aggression ever. Stay calm and walk noisily away. Or just start making noise. But don't go towards. Even if ...


10

Yes. My wife is a geologist and has been on a couple of research cruises in the south Pacific and Indian oceans. It used to be quite common to have a "swim call" when the seas were calm. The vessel would stop, and the crew and scientific staff would go for a swim. In one case a student lost her leg to a shark during a swim call on a NOAA ship. I believe that ...


1

Any system which relies on preventing kids form exploring while outdoors seems to be both self-defeating and unlikely to work. My advice is to talk to them about what they should do if they do get lost so they can help in their own rescue. Similarity putting too strong a prohibition on wandering off is only likely to make them more prone to panic and ...


1

Working in a very tick infested woods for a summer, I accumulated many tick-bites (before learning the wonders of vinegar solutions for repelling ticks). Most of the tick removals were done at the end of the day in my cabin, where I did my thorough tick-checks. This was recommended to me and worked very well in my experience of over 1 month with 5+ ticks a ...


3

In sweden, where skate touring is a popular winter sport, skaters bring a device called "ispik". (Ice pike). They come in two varieties. Either double pike, that looks like a sturdier version of a ski pole or a single pike that looks more like a broomstick with a tapered metal point. Generally speaking a single pike is easier to use but a double pike can ...


4

You need between 3 and 4" of clear ice to be safe, but, with practice, you can visually determine if there is this amount or more. The key is that ice can support your weight in boots and not yet be safe for dynamic or concentrated loads (i.e. jumping or ice skating). The basic technique is that you first bash the edge of the ice (it is always thinnest at ...


5

A quick online search shares a few tips which echo what I've heard from ice fishermen and experienced myself: Ice freezes first and thaws first at the edges, and these areas tend to be weaker. Knowing the terrain and where the shallows and weak spots are is important. Larger and more turbulent bodies of water take longer to freeze. If you're going to test ...



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