New answers tagged

1

Stay inside. Being outside is fraught with dangers. There is good advice here. I lean more to the "inspection after the fact" camp. I don't think prevention is statistically better than inspection enough to warrant the expense and time required to do so. I believe it would detract from the experience and start the excursion off with a mindset of fear ...


-1

My suggestion would be to use your long sling and place three carabiners with clove hitches into it. This offers the following advantages: With the clove hitches you could adjust the entire assembly to the ideal length. The sling is not in danger of getting damaged by the hangers You minimize single points of failure (Apart from the third carabiner and ...


0

The previous answer fits with the Alberta Parks advice regarding bears — they suggest carrying both noise makers and bear spray, with noise makers being used for bears still at distance. They include air-horns as options. Bears' response to any stimulus is dependent on many variables - not the least of which is the species of bear and its relative ...


4

Ticks are arachnoids and have an interesting life-cycle that you must understand if you want to avoid them. What this diagram doesn't explain is how the tick seeks a host. There may be as many as five blood meals in the life of a tick. Each is followed by moulting after which the tick climbs tall grass. It hangs from the end of a frond, waving barbed ...


3

It is hard to tell from the photo exactly how the carabiner would be loaded if clipped directly to the bolts. I think of cross loading as when the carabiner is weighted along the minor (short) axis. I wouldn't use the term cross loading when a carabiner gets weighted over an edge or weird bump in the rock. In general, if you do not feel confident in the ...


1

In my experience ticks hold on very strongly with their bite. I would not recommend any make-shift way of removing them. When using tweezers for example you take the risk of clipping off the body from the head. Leaving that small part stuck might then lead to inflammation. For several years now I’ve been using special “tick pliers” (see also): They have a ...


6

Because I trust my biners way more than I trust a sling threaded though bolts, I consider a relying on (my) single biner safer than the above set up. With the hardware visible to me in that picture I would make a single point anchor using two biners, sling and one bolt, and back it up with the sling though the other bolt providing redundancy. Effectively ...


8

Webbing/cord and bolts I always learned that bolts and any kind of webbing or cord is a no-go. Even if the edges are not sharp the webbing/cord is bent around a very small radius which weakens it significantly. Today there is one new option: Kevlar cords. These can be used directly in bolts, as they are very abrasion resistant. So if you have any with ...


4

I'm a bit surprised to see that nobody else as suggested this, but powder the top of your shoes/socks and bottom of your pants with sulfur. Powdered sulfur is available at local feed/ranch stores, and maybe even Wal-Mart or Lowes, depending on where you are. It's inexpensive and you can use an old sock as a very effective applicator. So as the others have ...


11

Coincidentally one of the physicians of Tropical Disease at a major Toronto Hospital has recently done a write up on ticks and how to deal with them. You can find the full article here. Here is the relevant part in case the link breaks in the future. What you can do: Insect repellants are effective at keeping ticks away. Dr. Keystone also recommends ...


6

(I'm adding this as an answer, because it addresses some points in the original question as well as supplementing the tips given by other answerers, but although it's kind of supplementary, it is too long to be a comment. If that's not correct SE etiquette, please let me know, but I thought the guidance was important enough to be added here.) Avoidance ...


-1

Around where I live, there is a very small species of tick that does not carry the disease, but causes a very unpleasant itch. Seeing them (before or after the fact) is difficult (magnifying glass stuff). The one tip that seems to work is adding about a cup of Dettol to your bath water (this product may not be available where you live). Also seems to work on ...


7

Disclaimer: I have to deal with the possibility of 'mingling' with Ticks on an almost daily basis during the summer. And generally speaking am pretty up to date on 'tick stuff' however do not only take my word for it - Lyme Disease is serious - definitely look stuff up. First off, Lyme Disease is only transmitted by certain 'subspecies' of ticks. (If you'...


19

You will pick up ticks by spending a lot of time outdoors, but I routinely find them after walking across 10 ft of grass between my car and my front door. No matter how much prevention you practice, keep an eye out for Lyme symptoms, and go to the doctor for antibiotics if they show up. A vaccine would be much nicer. The socks-in-your pants method is very ...


8

avoid grass and shrubs; keep your clothings shut tight, i.e. there should be as less places for the tick to get to your body as possible; wrap socks around pants, wear long-sleeved shirt, put something on your head; inspect yourself from time to time - especially after you've been to dense plants area; very simple, but still effective (saved me a couple of ...


17

Probably the single most important thing I do is to tuck the bottom of my pants into the socks. Ticks like to crawl upwards. If they drop onto your feet, they will crawls upwards on your leg looking for the first bit of soft skin with blood vessels close to the surface. If they can get inside your pants, they will find such skin eventually. Otherwise, ...


1

I just was told this last weekend: Lock your tent! Of course thiefes can cut the tent and still steal your stuff but at least your insurance is going to pay if the tent was locked (check the conditions of your insurance and in doubt ask your insurer). Besides that you should not leave your valuable stuff in the tent alone, also if it's just valuable for ...


4

Assuming you can avoid rope abrasion, do swings like this damage climbing ropes? Swing goes straight into a pendulum with no/limited free fall. I can't see it doing any special damage to the rope that wouldn't occur through climbing. I would make regular inspections of the rope and retire/replace equipment when necessary. The fall factors involved are ...


0

short answer: Safety > Conveniance. Long answer: For mountaineering I'd suggest using a leash, I'm sure your aware but if you were to lose it you would have a hard time performing all these tasks; Self arresting a fall on a steep snow slope. Extracting your self from a crevasse. Rescuing a partner from a crevasse. Building bucket seat anchor. Building a ...


6

Notice: I consider this a question about classical mountaineering. The question becomes very debatable if you include steep ice. In short: Do not use hand leashes on mountaineering ice axes: you attach a sharp tool to yourself which has a high chance of serious injury in case of a fall. Safety While there is a whole bunch of pros and cons, the one deciding ...


5

I'm talking about a single "alpine walking axe" here, not a pair of climbing axes. (I presume this is what you mean?) For me it's pretty strightforward: Pro It stops you dropping your axe (or more to the point if you do drop it you won't loose it) Cons It's a pain and gets in the way (just generally in my experience) It makes swapping hands more ...


2

Not dropping the ice axe is a pro in some circumstances and a con in others. If you drop into a crevasse it would be really nice to hang on to your ice axe to aid in your rescue and finishing or evacuating the climb. One the other hand, if you fall on a slope and loose control of your ice axe, then being tethered to a flailing rod with lots of sharp edges ...


3

Camping is an outdoor sport, with many opportunities for unexpected events. Don't bring anything that can't be exposed to the weather, and don't bring anything that will cause you emotional hardship if it does not return home with you. I have been camping for years, and have never lost anything to theft, nor has anyone I know lost anything to theft. I ...


7

In order to understand the question of rabies and whether or not an animal is rabid, a little background information is necessary. Once rabies infection occurs, the virus grows in muscle tissue and may go undetected for several days or months. During this incubation (or latent) period, the animal appears healthy and shows no sign of infection. ...


4

From the Humane Society Nocturnal animals active in the daytime or vice versa. Excessive drooling Lack of fear of humans Aggressive behavior It does note that there is both a "furious" form where they may act agitated and a "dumb" form where they may act drunk. From the Merck Veterinary Manual Paralysis Seizures Inability to swallow Also the type of ...


3

Ken Graham has a great deal of useful information in his answer, which I will not repeat. But the OP has specifically asked how to deal with a rabid animal's carcass when he is out hunting. However, the OP has not specified how populated the area is, or whether the hunter is alone or with companions. The most important instructions are do nots: do not ...


5

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife has a series of protocols in place for this subject. Protocols for Safe Handling and Disposal of Carcasses: All dead animals should be handled only while wearing gloves; this includes carrying of dead animals, during necropsy procedures, and the dressing out of carcasses. There are several types of ...


4

It seems you are asking about risks of lightning striking close by, but not directly on you. In other words, the lightning current isn't passing thru you on its way between the ground and the sky. There are certainly risks. I think the two main ones are flying debris and ground currents. The current in lightning is very high, can heat things above the ...


-2

Duct tape is not waterproof. If using tape use packing tape. But better to repair with bondo fiberglass repair or kitty hair.


6

Close enough to shock i.e. an indirect strike According to the National Lightning Safety Institute lightning has been observed to arc out 40 meters and how far it conducts varies. Possible outcomes Death Concussive injury Burns Lichtenberg figures Blunt force trauma Cardiac Arrhythmias Kidney damage Cataracts Eardrum damage Lower extremity paralysis ...


7

Here are a couple of tips. Make it harder for them to steal anything, roll up your vehicle's windows and lock its doors. Make your stuff less attractive to thieves, cover valuables with a blanket and don't flash expensive gear or jewelry. Exude confidence, look people in the eye, walk with a confident stride, and make it clear that you are not someone to ...


5

Caravan parks often have safes for people to use (rent). That's likely your best bet. They're often a bit like the lockers you get in swiming baths. Baring that it's either hide things (Bottom of a sleeping bag works ok but obviously your taking a risk) or take anything valuable with you.


3

I don't know how to compute the odds, but being out on a lake in a lightning storm is a really bad idea. The mountains around the lake aren't going to provide cover. There are several models about how nearby tall object protect you from getting directly hit by lightning. None of these are accurate or guarantees, as there is still much chance associated ...


6

Your chances of getting hit by lightning while on the water are actually higher then if you are on the beach. (unless you are fishing) Fishing contributed to almost half - 46% - of the water-related deaths involving lightning strikes; while boating (power boats, canoes, sailboats, tubes) added another 25%. About 20% of the victims were relaxing on a ...


2

Being struck directly is very unlikely though. Canoes are often made from wood, aluminum or fiberglass, although some plastic is used as well. Lightning strikes insulating materials all the time, like wooden trees or wooden houses. This is why lightning rods are found on wood buildings, to stop any lightning bolt from setting the building on fire. ...


2

Is it possible to drive the route from Helsinki at this time of the year? In general, yes, you should have no problem driving from Helsinki to Saariselkä towards the end of May. Be cautious of moose and reindeer crossing the road in front of you (or lurking at the edges). How about getting from Saariselkä to the parking lot in Aittajarvi, is it ...


1

Anecdotally, I once walked alone from Chandra Tal, in the Spiti valley in northern India, to Baralach La, where I took a bus to Leh. There was a trail that went along a large river, but there were fast-flowing mountain streams that fed into it. I was cautious because I was alone, and these streams distressed me greatly. Each day I encountered a stream - ...


3

Although not the effect of mountains river, local conditions are important, sometimes in ways you may not have thought of. Here is an example of one that you may find interesting, taken 5 km inland. However, rain higher up is not always obvious lower down stream and can lead to unexpected river levels.


9

I think the best answer to this question is going to be It Depends Even if its not glacier fed, the melting snow of ice could have an impact and increase the water flow during the afternoon. The effect could be effected by the distance from source, if any dams are upstream, and the time of year. Some river flows are monitored with gauges and the current ...


1

Variations in the appearance of the snow can help detect where crevasses may be. It often helps to get a low angled light perspective such as at dawn or sunset. Depressions in the snow cover may be revealed by a different appearance. Fresh, wind blown snow or dust particles may collect in depressions which could indicate a sagging snow bridge. Crevasses ...


0

Gloves protect your hands from a couple of hazards: Cold (cold air, cold metal, cold rock/ice). Rain and snow, which make it even colder Sunburns Scratches and wounds The latter is a very serious reason. With gloves off, if you stumble and fall on rocks hands first, you can easily get massive scranches or wounds. It is worse with a heavy backpack. ...



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