New answers tagged

3

I have been doing quite a bit a research on rope as I am nearing the completion of my magnificent 40 foot tree swing project. in all that I have gathered from seemingly knowledgeable sources...braided polyester is what you want, for durability, and non-stretch. After that it seems the fallback would be a natural rope fibre requiring replacement at least ...


3

In addition to the given answer, I'd like to say that motorbike helmets that you fall with with the helmet actually hitting something should be replaced! The cushioning effect will not be the same on the spot that took an impact. Of course you can take the chances, but I wouldn't use it again when riding a motorbike, impact speed is generally a lot higher ...


2

To add to a set of already great answers I would like to add two points: Glued bolts and weird old bolts. There are generally two types of bolts used presently: Mechanical and glued bolts. Mechanical bolts are mostly sleeve anchors: When tightening the nut the first time a cone is driven under the sleeve which is thus forced against the wall of the borehole....


2

In old routes in European (at least) mountains and in quarries used by cavers for training you can find small expansion bolts called spits or Cheville Autoforeuse. They use just 8 mm thick screws and are very short because they are often drilled by hand. You often need your own hangers but sometimes they could be pre-installed. These can fail. Cavers never ...


1

Being at fault has nothing to do with the decision. If you are in trouble and cannot extricate yourself without risk to life or making your injuries more serious, you push the button, cost be dammed.


4

You have one principle risk of injury as a spotter, and that is from a climber falling on top of you or hitting you. As a spotter, your job is simply to direct falls to the crash pad. You are not there to actually catch the person, you are not there to be a crashpad, you are there to ensure that the pad stays under the climber, and that the climber lands ...


14

This is not a complete list per se. If bouldering outdoors, particularly with an overhang, wear a helmet. This isn't to protect you from a fall, it's to protect your head for if rocks get knocked down onto you. When spotting, maintain an athletic stance. If you just stand normally, you won't be able to absorb impact from a fall as well. "Spoons, not ...


2

You could take steps to evaluate and mitigate your specific risk. e.g. Check whether the entire route is under cellphone network coverage Analyse how popular is the route? Should you have a disabling fall how long will it be before another person comes across you? Check on response times for rescue services to reach the route. Investigate the ...


5

Previous summer I spent a week in Switzerland and did four via ferrata's on my own. The risk varies greatly depending on the weather and the route. One day there was mist and snow, and I went up a mountain anyway. The climb went well, but when I got to the top you couldn't see the very much and it was hard to find the way back. Luckily someone else did the ...


17

The overall risk comparison between being alone or in a group can be split into parts: falling: no increased risk This is obviously independent of being in a group or soloing as climbing on a via ferrata is a solo activity. severity of fall: hardly any increased risk The safety device used on via ferratas is a single user device. So the only factor ...


11

Quantifying the total risk of an activity is hard and to an extent opinion based. The increased risk of being solo, is more quantifable and that is what my answer focuses on. The major increase in risk of doing a via ferrata alone (as opposed to in a group or with a partner) is that if you get injured (e.g., from a fall, rock fall, or a bee sting), you will ...



Top 50 recent answers are included