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13

The short answer is "bear spray"; a firearm is really not the most effective option. That said... I will assume you are looking for grizzly protection, since you didn't specify the bear and black bears are relatively shy. Again, using spray is a far more effective way of improving your odds; a review of its use in Alaska found a 98% success rate, with no ...


4

Belaying Multi-pitch It's often recommended to belay off the harness (an "indirect" belay) when belaying the leader, and off the anchor (a "direct" belay) when belaying the follower. Use of an indirect belay for the leader reduces the force on the anchors, but does require consideration of how the belayer may be pulled in a fall. Use of a direct belay ...


7

There are many different types of belays from above, e.g., you could be belaying for someone on third-class snow, with your dug-in crampons as part of your anchor. In that particular situation, you want to belay off of your body. Belaying off of your body has the disadvantage that if the climber takes a fall, you may be whipped around. A possible advantage ...


4

(Update: I have now realized you were talking about belaying the leader, and not the second climber. I am updating my answer to take this into account.) What does "belay from the body" mean? According to your remark on the direction of the pool, I guess it means the rope doesn't pass through the anchor at all. This type of belaying seems not safe, ...


6

To start with, each situation will be different. E.g. if you have an overhang and your partner is hanging freely in space, you may need to handle things a bit differently. Lowering an unconscious leader is also dangerous, as lower-angle terrain can exacerbate their injuries, and getting them caught on an unseen ledge could introduce slack. Also, if you ...


3

Although there is information on various websites and forums on self-rescue techniques, you really cannot learn enough to cope with a situation just by reading about it without a LOT of hands-on practice. To start with try and get help as much as you can - for instance shouting for help if there are any other climbers nearby. Get them to phone immediately ...


2

I think a climbing checklist is very important, but it's a fairly personal process. Of course in climbing you are part of a partnership and the person on the other end of the rope needs to be safe as well, but you can role-model and set a good standard. There are two ways that I teach pre-climb checking off, each of which can and should be customized to ...


4

I think you bought the wrong pair of 5.10s. I've got some Anasazi Whites I specifically bought them for edging. they have a thick(ish) sole area around the rim to provide better support when placing weight on the edges. I would suggest that the Moccasym's are a lot softer and are optimised for smearing on rough rock. 5.10s are known to be more ...


3

Your climbing shoes shouldn't hurt at all. Andrew Bisharat has a great article to read on the subject: http://eveningsends.com/climbing/climbing-shoes-tight/ In summary, here's what the article says: It's a misconception that shoes have to be uncomfortably tight for good performance. Using shoes that are too tight can cause various physical problems. ...


7

There are definitely some "checklist" mnemonics for new climbers, but no standard set. Even among the ACMG & AMGA, every guide and instructor might use something slightly different, or not use any at all. Here is the one I teach new climbers personally. It's rather simple, but it seems to stick. Anchor Belayer Climber Anchor may simply be a check to ...


2

Many climbers are moving away from using cordelettes, including Will Gadd and John Long. Instead a double length sling is clipped to two pieces making a magic x with a third piece and a second sling adding complete redundancy. This set up equalizes much better than a cordelette in most situations and you don't have to carry around a bunch of bulky 7mm. ...



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