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2

This is a perfectly legitimate thing to do. It's not uncommon for climbers to take a 60 or 70 meter rope and cut a few meters off the ends (since the ends of a rope take a lot of abuse). You can either take it to REI, as you suggested, and tell them you are cutting it for climbing or check out this how-to on Climbing.com. A few things you need to consider ...


3

You can cut it yourself. I would use something sharp so that you get a clean cut. Healing (using a flame to melt) the cut ends and wrapping them in tape (like they come from the manufacture) will be needed. Before you do that though, you might want to consider not cutting it at all. While a 70 meter rope is pretty long for most applications in climbing, ...


4

You can take it back to REI or to another gear store that deals with climbing gear. Make sure they know the rope is indeed being used for climbing. They should be able to cut it and prepare the cut ends so there isn't any fraying/unraveling, etc.


4

Welcome to outdoors.SE! Older buildings often contain asbestos in solid form, and it may be sealed up (under floorboards, in tape around heating ducts, etc.). As long as it's not ground up into dust, the hazard is minimal. For example, construction workers knocking down a building or remodeling it can get exposed to asbestos dust if they don't realize that ...


0

in general trekking (hiking) is not very common in RSA and most of the possibilities will be maintained by the MCSA. I recommend that you get in contact with the Cape Town section of the MCSA and ask about longer hiking trips. Generally you have to consider that most land in RSA is private property and owners may not allow trespassing. But if the MCSA tells ...


1

I think it depends very much on the area. In my area, it's very uncommon to encounter anyone once you get in more than a mile or two from the roads. Back there people are generally safer from other humans than they are in town. However, there is always the possibility and it is good to be prepared. Carrying pepper spray and/or a taser (depending on the ...


2

British mountaineer Andy Kirkpatrick has quite a bit of useful information regarding how to look after your feet at altitude and in cold conditions on his website at http://www.andy-kirkpatrick.com/articles/view/how_to_avoid_frostbitten_feet. The only recommendation on footwear size he gives with respect to high altitude, is for Neoprene socks. He ...


7

Suppose I get to the top of a sport route ... and I want to ... end up with a top-rope setup. "Top-rope setup" implies that someone else is going to climb the same route after you get down, right? Can anyone lay out all the typical steps...? Hang a locking karabiner (or a pair of non-locking quickdraws) on the anchor Clip your rope into it ...


6

What you're talking about is called Cleaning Cleaning This video covers the process in detail. But in short: Attach your self to the top anchor with a spare clip draw (or two), or better yet a sling attached to your harness using a larks foot and a locking biner. Inform your belayer that you're safe (but not off belay) Tie a figure of eight on the bight ...



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