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The blue-ringed octopuses (genus Hapalochlaena) are three (or perhaps four) octopus species that live in tide pools and coral reefs in the Pacific and Indian Oceans, from Japan to Australia (mainly around southern New South Wales and South Australia, and northern Western Australia). They are recognized as some of the world's most dangerous marine animals. ...


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This is really just a hypothesis, but here in the UK we also get mixed wader flocks. A significant reason for large/mixed flocks to occur is predation. Watch out for what happens when a large flock of waders (almost by definition very exposed on the ground) spots a falcon. They scatter in every direction, not maintaining a straight line for any time at all. ...


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In the UK one of the more dangerous sea creatures is the weever fish. They are often found in shallow, sandy water, particularly around Cornwall and the south west, and have venomous spines on their backs. Being stung is very painful and can result in severe swelling. Stings are generally caused by standing on them unawares while barefoot, so can easily be ...


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You're right that the various species of shorebirds, including in your area, like most of the same types of foods. The diet is primarily comprised of invertebrates such as crustaceans, worms, mollusks, and insects. Although some species are indeed bigger, they tend to co-exist peacefully. One reason is that they have different types of bodies and bills, ...


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After having a look on Google I found that yes you can use a pull buoy out in open water, and that they are often used in Triathlons to help the swimmer as they will often be very tired at this point and can allow their legs to rest between the bicycle stint and the running stint. This is as they are designed to improve your pull, leaving your legs to 'drag' ...


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Disregarding floating devices altogether (because they can easily be abandoned if needed), where and when you decide to swim in tidal waters should entirely depend on expertise of those waters. Currents are local phenomenon which do not necessarily replicate themselves from one place to another because the number of variables that lead to a predictable ...


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"hanging out" together happens because different species eat the same food, require the same nesting areas, migrate in the same flyways, etc. Many species compete/become territorial for nesting areas, but less so for food sources.



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