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4

Early October should not be overly busy. South bounders (SOBO) starts around July and will be out of Main by that time. North bounders (NOBO) must finish before October 15 and many of them will already have completed the trail. For SOBOs, June-July is the peak season for Maine. There are less than 500 thru hikers per season in this direction. For NOBOs, ...


4

A hut like this should at least be dry and reasonably sheltered so you might get draughts but not direct driving winds. This means that you can afford to focus on warmth rather than more general shelter if you are confident that you can reach a hut every night. In this sort of context down sleeping bags are attractive as they offer excellent warmth and ...


4

For a lean-to: Sleeping bag - And other sleeping items for warmth. Ground pad - The floor of the lean-to will chill you almost as quickly as the ground. Also it protects your sleeping bag from dirt, etc. A tarp - This is for hanging across the door if needed to block wind and/or precipitation.


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My husband and I backpacked around Europe for 3 months, sleeping in a hammock almost the entire time. At first we slept side by side with our heads on the same end. It was horrible. So we switched to having our heads on opposite ends, with each person slanted, forming a tight X. It was comfortable, and we are planning on exchanging our bed for a hammock.


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I've slept a few nights in a double hammock with my girlfriend, and it definitely works well- but you have to take into account your normal sleeping habits in a bed. We tend to sleep spooning, which is very easy to accomplish in a hammock. We have an ENO double nest, and I'd say the biggest problem we've encountered is just difficulty with bedding, which ...



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