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13

It's not animals you really need to worry about, it's bugs. I pack a tent to keep out of the bugs more than I do to keep the critters out. The only time I can ever remember having issues with animals was in the Ptolemy Plateau, for some reason there were a lot of gophers, and they were all over our campsite at night, scratching at the walls of out tent and ...


7

That lean-to in the link looks like it would shelter from all but the most wind driven rain. If you pack a cheap vinyl poncho that should take care of most situations. They are light enough that you can pack a second. What is the temperature rating on your sleeping bag? 15F/-10C will probably be more than warm enough. If you are carrying a summer bag, you ...


7

No, there won't be anything electrical. A front country kitchen will usually contain: a wood burning stove 2-4 picnic tables food storage lockers a bear proof trash container (nearby) Depending on the park there may be a woodpile next to the kitchen. Food storage lockers are also dependant on the park and the wild life situation (e.g. bears, racoons), ...


5

IMO you totally don't need a tent. Plenty of people, including me, prefer to sleep out under the stars even if there's no hut. It can be difficult to sleep with a wind blowing across one's face, but that won't be happening inside the hut. It's also off the ground, so you won't be losing heat into the dirt. Yes, the temperature inside will be the same as ...


4

I own a Grand Trunk Double hammock (10.5' long x 6.5' wide), I'm 5'10" 160 lbs, my wife is 5'4" and not overweight (I'm not writing the # ;) ). Slept 2 nights so far with her in the hammock. We each had our own sleeping bag. We were definitely squished together tightly. We couldn't roll over. That said, we both slept okay. It is definitely less comfortable ...


4

One of the fun things about tarping is that every tarp setup is different. For that reason it's hard to make generalizations. Also, it may make a difference what environment you're in. In some places, you're virtually guaranteed a rainstorm every evening. In others (the Sierra in summer), you basically don't expect rain, and the tarp is a piece of emergency ...


2

You could talk to the guys at Panther Primitives. They make high-quality canvas wall tents for the historical reenactment community, and they spend a sizeable amount of time camping in them. However, I really think your answer is a yurt (or ger). They are round, so that helps with high winds. They are big enough to walk around in. They have ...


2

I did it for three nights. First night was more like intermittent napping, but my girlfriend slept great. The second night I woke up twice. The third night I was more concerned with the flapping sound from my rain fly, the creaking trees and the sideways wind. After minimizing the flapping sound I slept as fine as I would have in those conditions on my own. ...


2

The risk of a serious problem is quite small. Animals instinctively stay away from humans, and that instinct is even stronger in backcountry areas where they haven't become accustomed to human presence. The gear that you don't sleep with is in more danger than anything else — rodents will chew pack straps and trekking pole handles for the salt. They're very ...


1

Given your criteria, I would go with bivy sacks. Making shelters from snow (even just tarp covered windbreaks) is energy and time consuming, eating up your already scarce daylight and what little energy you have leftover from hiking/snowshoeing/skiing to camp. A commentary on group size, though: it's almost always a bad idea to go winter mountaineering with ...


1

Think of the time you can invest and rather you'd want to invest into making one of these, as it takes quite an effort and time to make one that you'll be wanting to be inside of. If you are in a hurry, consider making a trench in stead of a snow cave. As a trench can be made far more quicker and takes less efforts, and can be relied upon in case of ...


1

Likely to be less buggy than a hammock, and doesn't have the weight of hiking poles. Also (and I'm not sure I'd try this), if you are concerned about being trampled/attacked by large animals, you could install it several feet up the tree. Finally, the floor looks flatter than a hammock, and the 3-point tiedown seems to keep it from rotating.


1

I use a 'pod' hammock tent for backpacking and enjoy it a lot. This bigger tree tent wouldn't be for backpacking but for car camping with friends or family. Sleeping in a suspended tent is clean, dry and more comfortable then sleeping on the ground. (everything being subject to your own opinion)



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