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38

The main use is pulling your shoes on, this is particularly obvious in rock climbing shoes that will often have multiple loops so you can really yank on them. Alternatively this can be used as an attachment point. From James Jenkins in the comments below - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootstrapping "Tall boots may have a tab, loop or handle at the top known as a ...


16

Carrying. The sling makes it easy to attach the shoe/boot to a backpack or something else. (For me, this is the main point.) For example, you can clip your approach shoes to your climbing harness (or your pack, if you carry one) if you plan to descend after a multi-pitch route instead of abseiling. Or you might want to take off your shoes and switch to a ...


5

They can also be held as a stabilizer while you put the shoes on, but without tugging. My podiatrist and orthopedist recommend not using it as a tool to pull on the footwear, even if it's high quality. After a year or two, especially if used frequently, that's enough to alter the shape. That causes breakdown of the inner structure so you lose proper ...


3

Already some great answers here: Along with the purpose of tieing them to a sling, and mainly for pulling the shoes while putting on or taking them off, I use them as an additional loop to pass the excess shoelace. This only makes sense with a shoe with high anklets. A shoe like the one shown above, usually come with a longer shoelace. I usually, leave ...


3

When talking about boots, what you absolutely have to be careful about are those that have too much room on the "backside" (i.e., heel, ankle, midfoot). That leads to your feet slipping around each step and can give you very bad blisters plus blue toenails when you hit the front. In this case, it can be worthwhile to try shoes that seem small(ish) for your ...


2

I've had this issue too - my feet are small but wide and I often have too much length in order to get the width. The main downside I've found is that I initially tend to trip or stub my toes on difficult ground, because I'm used to something shorter I guess. After an hour or two the mind seems to adjust, but just be alert at the start in case you end up ...


1

It is a common expectation that, like in your daily routine, you can expect to keep your feet nice and dry for an entire multi-day hike. Gear manufacturers contribute to this perception by promoting equipment as waterproof, breathable, etc. The fact is, if it rains, you can't. There are a number of reasons why: Your shoe requires a big hole in it to put ...



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