Hot answers tagged

38

The main use is pulling your shoes on, this is particularly obvious in rock climbing shoes that will often have multiple loops so you can really yank on them. Alternatively this can be used as an attachment point. From James Jenkins in the comments below - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootstrapping "Tall boots may have a tab, loop or handle at the top known as a ...


16

Carrying. The sling makes it easy to attach the shoe/boot to a backpack or something else. (For me, this is the main point.) For example, you can clip your approach shoes to your climbing harness (or your pack, if you carry one) if you plan to descend after a multi-pitch route instead of abseiling. Or you might want to take off your shoes and switch to a ...


15

I would say that this guy at the hut was plain wrong. As far as I'm concerned, the working principle of the Gore-Tex membrane is gradient-driven. That means, the membrane itself (if you consider only the membrane and ignore the layers it is sandwitched in) does not have any physical or chemical preference to transport moisture into a certain direction. ...


14

Concerning using hiking shoes on asphalt: it certainly can be done and is a much better option than the other way around (i.e. taking a business shoe on a mountain hike). Hiking shoes are a bit stiffer in their construction and might have a little less damping in their sole which can make them a bit uncomfortable to walk on longer asphalt stretches but this ...


9

Benedikt already gave a good answer and he is right that a hiking boot would be a massive overflow. It just looks ridiculous because it is simply not designed to be used on flat terrain. What you need is a comfy and weather resistant shoe. Therefore you could go for a light hiking shoe. I am wearing my approach shoes in daily use from time to time. But just ...


7

The question has the tag "mountaineering," but most of the time when I hear people say that you need boots with ankle support, they're actually talking about trail-walking. The cases of hiking and mountaineering are qualitatively different. For mountaineering, one big reason people usually don't use lightweight running shoes is that often there is talus, ...


5

I've only skateboarded much when I was younger, and have only about an hour of practice total this past year, but here is what I know: There are a few things that make a skate shoe good for skateboarding. The sole is very flat, and typically grippy, so it adheres well to the skateboard. The shoe's body is typically cushy, to protect your foot if you land ...


5

They can also be held as a stabilizer while you put the shoes on, but without tugging. My podiatrist and orthopedist recommend not using it as a tool to pull on the footwear, even if it's high quality. After a year or two, especially if used frequently, that's enough to alter the shape. That causes breakdown of the inner structure so you lose proper ...


5

Your final sentence is correct. The newspaper will wick water from internal fabric, but it will not pull water back through the Gore-Tex layer. It only allows water vapour to pass through. You actually need quite a head of pressure to force water through Gore-Tex, otherwise it would leak when you walk through a river, for example. The hiking boots my ...


4

I'll chime in from a fairly unique position with anecdotal evidence only. I feel like most of the advice you'll get is from experts that talk down to you condescendingly if you even mention the b-word. I'll describe my scenario and you can interpret it however you wish. I have been wearing minimalist 'barefoot' type shoes casually since probably earlier ...


4

Full leather shoes are easy to take care of in a way: they'll perform exactly accordingly to how you treat them. First off: if the shoes are new, don't to anything. They'll already be treated/impregnated and ready to use (apart from breaking them in). You'll likely not gain anything by applying additional impregnation. Treatments I have experience with: ...


4

The type of boot you want will depend greatly on what sort of hiking you are doing, both in terms of distance and terrain. Personal preference also plays a strong role. For day walks on decent paths you will probably be fine with a sturdy pair of trainers or running shoes. Whereas for longer routes over rougher terrain, a studier boot if probably better, as ...


4

I keep a pair of loafers or Rockports at the office. That way I can wear whatever shoes are appropriate/comfortable for traveling to/from the office and switch once I get there. For me, hiking boots are what I wear in sloppy weather and running shoes are for when I run into work. A plastic trash bag is nice to have to put under the sloppy boots to keep from ...


3

Already some great answers here: Along with the purpose of tieing them to a sling, and mainly for pulling the shoes while putting on or taking them off, I use them as an additional loop to pass the excess shoelace. This only makes sense with a shoe with high anklets. A shoe like the one shown above, usually come with a longer shoelace. I usually, leave ...


3

Two suggestions. Buy canvas sneakers or tennis shoes, or even those flat soled kungfu shoe style slippers. Leather boat shoes.


3

This question is extremely subjective, so anyone with experience will (and should) come up with his one personal way. What I will describe is therefore just an idea of when and why to use shoes with ankle support. The distinctions between the two types that cause the different application exceed the (no) ankle support: boots (ankle support) stiff sole ...


3

Yes, you are seeing it right, I am answering the question right away, but I intentionally asked this question so that I can have more views and opinions about it, specially the ones that contradicts what I think. I would rather prefer to have it decided upon what I am planning to do on-field. If I am going at a route that involves Rock-climbing, I don't ...


3

The solution is to invest in an actual pair of trail running shoes, they are stiffer, and snugger, and compensate for all of the issue that you're having with your road runners there. I have a pair of asics trail runners: asics gel fuji trabuco 3 They have a surprisingly stiff sole, they are snug even when not laced, and are extremely stable. I also ...


3

I lean towards light and fast dry running shoes such as the Lone Peak from Altra. This shoe goes under $100 on sale. It also comes with a gator-ready velcro at the back. There is no ankle support which I don't personally consider a problem. I've seen this shoe recommended at trail shops. They seem to be quite popular on long trails nowadays. I recommend ...


3

When talking about boots, what you absolutely have to be careful about are those that have too much room on the "backside" (i.e., heel, ankle, midfoot). That leads to your feet slipping around each step and can give you very bad blisters plus blue toenails when you hit the front. In this case, it can be worthwhile to try shoes that seem small(ish) for your ...


2

I've had this issue too - my feet are small but wide and I often have too much length in order to get the width. The main downside I've found is that I initially tend to trip or stub my toes on difficult ground, because I'm used to something shorter I guess. After an hour or two the mind seems to adjust, but just be alert at the start in case you end up ...


2

I have a pair of hiking shoes that are waterproof so they appear to have been dipped in rubber for about an inch and a half up the shoe. They work with our dress code but I find that when I leave the carpeted area into the hardwood lobby where as everyone else's shoes go "click clack" mine go "squish squish"! Every time that happens I consider wearing my ...


1

Without further information on the actual fabric makeup of the nyloprene being used by stohlquist it is going to be extremely difficult to properly answer this. This reason for this is because different companies are making nyloprene in different manners. As I am sure you know nyloprene is a multi-layer fabric of neoprene and other fabrics, including but ...


1

Trail runners, cross trainers, and court (tennis) shoes have better side support that will help prevent this.


1

A lot definitely comes down to personal preference. Some like tall boots, light weight trail runners, more "classic" hiking boots, regular sneakers, or even sandals (I don't recommend that last one...) My preference is actually for a 8" combat / law enforcement style boot (preferably with a side-zip for easy removal). I feel that they provide a good amount ...


1

I treat my leather boots with neatsfoot oil, and that generally is plenty to protect the leather and keep it supple in mud and wet. If it is snow with a lot of salt and things around, I might add something waxy like Snoseal or mink oil. Overall, neatsfoot oil is cheap and works wonderfully. Generally it is all I need spending a lot of time outdoors in ...


1

What brands and product lines to look first? Try as many as you can! The fit (not the brand) is the most important. Try on lots and see which ones feel the best. Which characteristics/features to look for? For that temperature range you want something pretty cooling. Lighter, thinner material boots are likely your best bet. It doesn't sound like ...


1

It is a common expectation that, like in your daily routine, you can expect to keep your feet nice and dry for an entire multi-day hike. Gear manufacturers contribute to this perception by promoting equipment as waterproof, breathable, etc. The fact is, if it rains, you can't. There are a number of reasons why: Your shoe requires a big hole in it to put ...



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