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11

Yes, shoe size plays a role which is quite important. But for beginners I would suggest to think more about foot technique than caring about the best possible gear. For climbing shoe sizes I give the following simple hints: choose the shoes as small as possible choose shoes which aren't causing ache of the foot/toes/nail/heel climbing rubber shoes will ...


10

Here are some features to keep in mind when buying climbing shoes once you're past the beginner phase: Downturned: Most beginner shoes are pretty flat, which are fine for mainly vertical walls. However, as you climb harder stuff on overhanging walls, it's helpful to have downturned shoes for maintaining a hook-like foot shape. This allows you to hook your ...


6

When I managed a climbing gym we got some resole kits so I thought I would give one a try. The result was not particularly good, but meant a pair of shoes that were totally trashed were at least wearable. The edges didn't bond particularly well, so there is not a very precise toe/edge. It is certainly nowhere near as good as if you get it done ...


6

Where I am from it costs $60CAN to get your climbing shoes Resoled by a professional. Alternatively, you can try yourself with a KIT that costs $35CAN. However this $35 does not include a knife, sandpaper or acetone to clean the shoe/rubber and does not account for labour, in other words your time taken to repair your shoes. Ultimately to me it seems to ...


5

I think you bought the wrong pair of 5.10s. I've got some Anasazi Whites I specifically bought them for edging. they have a thick(ish) sole area around the rim to provide better support when placing weight on the edges. I would suggest that the Moccasym's are a lot softer and are optimised for smearing on rough rock. 5.10s are known to be more ...


5

Your climbing shoes shouldn't hurt at all. Andrew Bisharat has a great article to read on the subject: http://eveningsends.com/climbing/climbing-shoes-tight/ In summary, here's what the article says: It's a misconception that shoes have to be uncomfortably tight for good performance. Using shoes that are too tight can cause various physical problems. ...


5

The go to shoe repair glue I've always used is Shoe Goo. I've used it mostly for when my soles started to separate from my uppers, and it's always done the job for me. As far as resoling your shoes, you're right in your suspicion that the "easy solution" doesn't last, Shoe Goo advertises that it can be used to rebuild worn soles, and it will for minor ...


5

I climb in vibram five-fingers (KSO's), climbed in them for the first time in 2008 and loved them, where they excel is in roofs and overhanging problems because you can hook holds a lot easier with your toes, but for tougher wall climbing with small features (5.11+) I still use climbing shoes. There are some gyms that allow climbing barefoot, but for the ...


3

Feet and fit are very personal and shoes are no substitute for good technique and strength. How should I choose the proper size of my climbing shoes? I think the best thing you could do would be to borrow a smaller pair from a friend next time you go climbing (or rent a pair) and see what works best for you. some general guidelines; Not being able ...


2

I find that hiking boots help protect my ankles and feet from twigs and things that can scratch or hit against them, help prevent rain from getting in (I can wear long pants with sneakers but still water will get inside), and protect my toes from stubbing them against rocks and boulders. Also the soles of the hiking boot offer more traction than the typical ...


2

Be careful to check the health warnings on most sterilizing sprays as most of them state not to get on your skin (I don't wear socks in my climbing shoes). There are also a large number of deodorizers, but they can at times produce a far more distracting scent that will fill a room instead of just filling your shoe. As for freezing your shoes, this can ...


2

Kill the bacteria that turns perspiration into a foul smell, sounds crazy but put them in the freezer overnight. This and a through onslaught with any other antibacterial treatments e.g. biological washing powder in luke warm water. As far as I'm aware there is no permanent cure. Do Not put them in the washing machine or use hot water as this may melt the ...


2

One thing is that I doubt it's possible to train the toes to have significant strength; unlike the fingers, they are simply not built for that job. And most of the time, you have a lot more weight on your feet than on your hands. Injury and strain would be a big problem. Then there's the sweating: there's actually more sweat glands in your soles than ...


2

There probably is a point where not having a toe-crunched fit would make a difference, but it's not V3. Climbing shoes do wear out relatively quickly. The difference in the sharpness of the rubber edge between a newly soled shoe and worn shoe can make a difference on small holds. Your climbing gym likely has a referral for getting climbing shoes re-soled. ...


2

Aside from the excellent answer by Michael Borgwandt, I have to add that a climbing shoe isn't just there for better gripping. Just like any other shoe, it also protects your feet from any sharp objects or rough surfaces that you may encounter along your trip. The more widely used paths have probably been worn down, but if you're on a new path, it is likely ...


1

What brands and product lines to look first? Try as many as you can! The fit (not the brand) is the most important. Try on lots and see which ones feel the best. Which characteristics/features to look for? For that temperature range you want something pretty cooling. Lighter, thinner material boots are likely your best bet. It doesn't sound like ...


1

I only wear hiking boots if there is significant off trail or heavy scree. The last dozen or so expeditions (1 week + trips ~50 lb pack) I did I mostly wore MEC reef boots, or divers boots, sized to allow medium weight work socks. The routes we did were mostly horse trails in Willmore Wilderness or in Rocky Clearwater Recreation Area (Alberta). With this ...



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