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30

You are using your old used sneaker-like city-shoes, sport-shoes or jogging-shoes to go hiking? Well, those are made for really flat paths without lots of surface irregularities and they aren't designed for rough conditions (wet and/or cold, difficult terrain, bigger loose stones and so on). Saying that, hiking shoes/boots are better for those conditions, ...


16

My ankles sprain easily. I have good quality walking boots that give good ankle support, because I need them. You may not. Everyone’s different. Yes, they’re heavier than runners, significantly heavier, in fact, but for my situation, they’re worth it. When I’m on rough terrain, and especially if I’m also carrying a heavy backpack, I can sprain my ankles very ...


14

There are many who nowadays shun boots and prefer to have lightweight footwear in all terrains and most weather conditions. It's worth having a look at Chris Townsend's website. He has hiked many long distance trails, including some in the US and has put together an article on his blog about the topic of Lightweight Footwear. It would be worth reading ...


11

Yes, shoe size plays a role which is quite important. But for beginners I would suggest to think more about foot technique than caring about the best possible gear. For climbing shoe sizes I give the following simple hints: choose the shoes as small as possible choose shoes which aren't causing ache of the foot/toes/nail/heel climbing rubber shoes will ...


11

Big, heavy "waffle stomper" boots are mainly a relic of the past, along with wool knickers and steel canteens. For most conditions, modern running shoes work far better. Any weight on your feet cuts down on your efficiency much more than a similar amount of weight on your back. Also, the heavier your boots get, the harder it is to keep from getting blisters, ...


10

The simple answer for me is that my feet hurt less. There are two factors that cause foot pain with regular shoes. The first is that rocks poke your feet through the soles. The second is that without good ankle support, you use more muscles in your feet to balance on uneven terrain. Personally, I didn't realize how much pain was caused by my shoes until ...


9

Here are some features to keep in mind when buying climbing shoes once you're past the beginner phase: Downturned: Most beginner shoes are pretty flat, which are fine for mainly vertical walls. However, as you climb harder stuff on overhanging walls, it's helpful to have downturned shoes for maintaining a hook-like foot shape. This allows you to hook your ...


8

Consider whether you really need to have dry shoes before going thru all the trouble. In the winter, wet footwear can be a serious problem. However, when it's warm out there is really no danger from wet shoes. The only issue may be that you simply don't like the feel of it. In situations where its warm enough and there is no real danger from wet shoes, ...


7

One advantage I'm missing so far is that hiking boots also protect the ankles against the outside (not only against sprainng): from getting scratched by or hitting stones, wooden branches sticking up, or stuff like blackberry twines (which I find very bad as they scratch heavily over the front part of the ankle, particularly where that tendon is). Of ...


6

As someone who's done a decent amount of hiking both with proper boots and a standby I used for years, hightop skateboarding shoes, here's the three major differences I've noticed: The boots definitely win in the waterproofness department. I would not do an extremely muddy trail in shoes. The boots have better traction but the significance of this is less ...


6

When I managed a climbing gym we got some resole kits so I thought I would give one a try. The result was not particularly good, but meant a pair of shoes that were totally trashed were at least wearable. The edges didn't bond particularly well, so there is not a very precise toe/edge. It is certainly nowhere near as good as if you get it done ...


6

Where I am from it costs $60CAN to get your climbing shoes Resoled by a professional. Alternatively, you can try yourself with a KIT that costs $35CAN. However this $35 does not include a knife, sandpaper or acetone to clean the shoe/rubber and does not account for labour, in other words your time taken to repair your shoes. Ultimately to me it seems to ...


6

The simplest answer is this. Hiking boots, with their higher top, prevent material such as stones, mud, snow, and water from easily getting into the shoe. If I hike on a graveled trail for example, I must empty my walking shoes of small stones about every 5 miles. In rougher conditions, it is easy to step into a puddle, or snow drift, that is more than ...


5

Good hiking boots also provide good arch and foot support. Even without the extra weight of a pack the constant stress on ones arches can be very fatiguing if not even damaging. Although humans were originally designed to go without footwear, most people today do not have feet that can go miles and miles without proper arch, toe and foot support. So, if ...


4

I think you bought the wrong pair of 5.10s. I've got some Anasazi Whites I specifically bought them for edging. they have a thick(ish) sole area around the rim to provide better support when placing weight on the edges. I would suggest that the Moccasym's are a lot softer and are optimised for smearing on rough rock. 5.10s are known to be more ...


4

Your climbing shoes shouldn't hurt at all. Andrew Bisharat has a great article to read on the subject: http://eveningsends.com/climbing/climbing-shoes-tight/ In summary, here's what the article says: It's a misconception that shoes have to be uncomfortably tight for good performance. Using shoes that are too tight can cause various physical problems. ...


3

Here are some ideas: Bring spare river crossing footwear Use hiking sandals (e.g. chacos) as your main footwear Use quick drying shoes instead of big boots Use a small towel to remove excess water by pressing on it against the sole of your shoe (repeat until no water can be drawn) Bring a spare pair of socks (wool is often prefered) to keep your feet dry; ...


3

Feet and fit are very personal and shoes are no substitute for good technique and strength. How should I choose the proper size of my climbing shoes? I think the best thing you could do would be to borrow a smaller pair from a friend next time you go climbing (or rent a pair) and see what works best for you. some general guidelines; Not being able ...


2

I find that hiking boots help protect my ankles and feet from twigs and things that can scratch or hit against them, help prevent rain from getting in (I can wear long pants with sneakers but still water will get inside), and protect my toes from stubbing them against rocks and boulders. Also the soles of the hiking boot offer more traction than the typical ...


2

There probably is a point where not having a toe-crunched fit would make a difference, but it's not V3. Climbing shoes do wear out relatively quickly. The difference in the sharpness of the rubber edge between a newly soled shoe and worn shoe can make a difference on small holds. Your climbing gym likely has a referral for getting climbing shoes re-soled. ...


2

The extra weight gives you more of a workout? I personally only use hiking boots when backpacking - due to the need for good stability. I have done Whitney 2x, half dome/cloud's rest 10x, other 14'ers, both climbing rapidly and running down in sneakers.


2

Kill the bacteria that turns perspiration into a foul smell, sounds crazy but put them in the freezer overnight. This and a through onslaught with any other antibacterial treatments e.g. biological washing powder in luke warm water. As far as I'm aware there is no permanent cure. Do Not put them in the washing machine or use hot water as this may melt the ...


2

First of all, this is why I DON'T prefer boots...at all. Sometimes you gotta' wear them though. Sometimes, for logouts, snow trekking, etc...boots are just mandatory. Boots hold an unbelievable amount of water; it annoys me to no end. Gore-Tex and the like are no better in practical applications. Drying footwear is a problem because of these two items: ...


1

I only wear hiking boots if there is significant off trail or heavy scree. The last dozen or so expeditions (1 week + trips ~50 lb pack) I did I mostly wore MEC reef boots, or divers boots, sized to allow medium weight work socks. The routes we did were mostly horse trails in Willmore Wilderness or in Rocky Clearwater Recreation Area (Alberta). With this ...


1

Be careful to check the health warnings on most sterilizing sprays as most of them state not to get on your skin (I don't wear socks in my climbing shoes). There are also a large number of deodorizers, but they can at times produce a far more distracting scent that will fill a room instead of just filling your shoe. As for freezing your shoes, this can ...



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