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10

The whole topic of sports equipment, sports health, and sports injuries is one in which the scientific quality of most of the information tends to be extremely poor. However, there is a group at Harvard that does research on barefoot running, and they have a web page with a lot of good information on it. As far as I've seen from browsing through their ...


8

The minimal set is one pair of versatile shoes. Although as you've seen, there's a confusing array of options, you can think of shoes for the outdoors as mostly falling on a spectrum from light (minimalist trail running shoes) to heavy (full-leather backpacking boots). REI has a great rundown of the types online here. Where you go on that spectrum is ...


7

Ben Crowell already answered the "why minimalist" angle better than I could have, but he didn't specifically talk about Vibram FiveFingers (hereafter VFF). This is intended to complement his answer. Generic pros of minimalist footware Little or no heel drop. As with other (true) "minimalist" footwear the VFF have little or no heel drop. This works with ...


5

Maybe? It may depend on where you're getting the blisters. A lot of the blisters that I get from hiking boots are on my heels, or on the sides of my toes. I don't think that barefoot walking would help build calluses in those places. If you want to walk barefoot, go ahead an experiment with that. But I'd also look at the general advice for avoid ...


5

You can do most one-day trails with a pair of sneakers. It's much more comfortable, than any type of "hiking boots". And also much lighter (you spend less energy lifting it up many thousand times a day), and more blister-proof. IMO, there are three situations, when you need something heavier: Hard terrain: rocks, snow, ice Low temperatures Heavy backpack ...


4

Generally speaking, the main differences between bouldering and top roping (unless you are an expert) is that you are likely to find yourself trying more extreme positions when bouldering. Huge generalisation, I know, but when top roping you usually look to conserve energy, assess the pitch, and make vertical gains. As a boulderer, you will be crabbing, ...


4

Blisters are more frequent between the toes than Anywhere on the bottom of the feet. And, with heavy trekking shoes, you are most likely to sustain blisters around toes and between them, so I guess as the above guy (theJollySin) said walking barefoot wont help much with blisters, But yeah it does help you to Harden your skin, make your ankle recover from any ...


4

We are all different and this problem is nothing rare. What you are describing is called overpronation, which means that you roll more on the inside of your foot when you walk. This is something that is rooted in your pattern of movement, i.e something that is very hard to change. The best way to remedy this would be to add some kind of padding to your ...


3

For that matter why don't you get a Jogger Shoe for you? When I had been to a running exped, I was told to get shoes with following Props: 1 - Got to have a double inner sole. (This implies that you get a shoe of size which is slightly bigger than you normal shoe size). This help you to expand and contract the skin, muscles of feet. 2 - Make sure that ...


3

You don't. You should ask to a orthopedic doctor about it (possibly one specialized in sport), and have proper measurement taken. Choosing a bad insole that goes against your leg building might seriously damage your joints and knees. Don't have a shopkeeper decide either, they are NOT qualified to know which of your leg is shorter or longer, how your knee ...


3

What sort of snow conditions are you running in? For dry, powdery snow, the best option is a pair running shoes that have aggressive tread (search for "trail running shoes"), but in wet, icy snow, metal screws or spikes will give you the extra grip you're looking for. I can't think of anything that will help more than it will hurt on icy pavement other than ...


2

Knee and Anlke pain In your question, you mention that you have recently been experiencing knee and ankle pain from hiking. Reading it again, it sounds like you're almost trying to find the "right" kind of outdoor shoes because your knees and ankles hurt while you were hiking in sneakers. IMHO, getting a fancy pair of hiking shoes may or may not address ...


2

I assume that by hiking shoes you mean robust hiking shoes which are more or less closed (i.e. not consisting of mesh material or the like). In terms of breathability it is also a huge difference if the shoe consists just of leather or fabric or if it has some breathable membrane such as Gore Tex. If you consider a shoe without a membrane that shall be ...


2

It would depend on the shoe. A full leather shoe would "Breathe" less because the air has more difficulty circulating all the way down to the toe and back. However, on a good "breathable" shoe, it wouldn't matter so much. My fast drying breathable shoes are all mesh with the vast majority of airflow coming straight through the shoe. For those, low versus ...


2

So, I have (I think) the opposite problem - the outside edges of my shoes wear more quickly than the inside edges. This kind of problem is common among runners, you can look at running websites for ideas about how to fix it. I was never able to fully fix the problem, buuuut... Treating the symptoms instead of the underlying problem works for me. I keep ...


1

I found this while shopping for a new pair and I figured I'd give my input. I left my Bikilas at my parent's house so figured I'd treat myself to a new pair. First off, to answer this: I wish I could feel all the rocks under my feet. Vibrams will accomplish this. Barefoot will accomplish this even more, but it really does a beating on your feet. I ...


1

Make sure the problem is in the shoes first. First, if you run on asphalt, try running on dirt trails. They are softer and provide much less shock to your joints. Second, make sure your running technic is correct. I would recommend the book from a world champion Gordon Pirie, which is very understandable by a non-professional runner. One basic idea from ...


1

It depends much more on your individual condition, how your body (mostly feet and knees) react to various kinds of shoes. There is a guy in the series "Dual survival" that claim not to need shoes at all, even in hard terrain. But it's extreme. If we limit the scope to the people not used to walking barefoot, and exclude special activities, such as ...


1

I've used Jordan david ice grips called Altragrips-Lite™ LP’s. I can go in and out of the store where I work. The spikes are 1mm studs that don't dig into the floor either. I've used over the years, and if they get wet, these ice grips have fallen off. However if you put some straps on them, the ice grips will not fall off. For more info ...


1

They key to all selly shoes is bacteria. From a prevention perspective, I always wash my feet before they spend a prolonged or arduous of time in shoes or boots. A good spray with an anti-bacteria can do the trick. I've also heard good thing about dusting them with bicarb and then vacuuming it out some time later.


1

I had a huge problem with smelly climbing shoes when climbing in the gym or on long multi-pitch days. The single most effective thing I have come across is taking the shoes off between climbs/pitches. This seems tedious at first, but once you make it part of your routine it's not that bad. There still is some smell, but the situation has drastically ...



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