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1

It is a common expectation that, like in your daily routine, you can expect to keep your feet nice and dry for an entire multi-day hike. Gear manufacturers contribute to this perception by promoting equipment as waterproof, breathable, etc. The fact is, if it rains, you can't. There are a number of reasons why: Your shoe requires a big hole in it to put ...


2

I've had this issue too - my feet are small but wide and I often have too much length in order to get the width. The main downside I've found is that I initially tend to trip or stub my toes on difficult ground, because I'm used to something shorter I guess. After an hour or two the mind seems to adjust, but just be alert at the start in case you end up ...


3

When talking about boots, what you absolutely have to be careful about are those that have too much room on the "backside" (i.e., heel, ankle, midfoot). That leads to your feet slipping around each step and can give you very bad blisters plus blue toenails when you hit the front. In this case, it can be worthwhile to try shoes that seem small(ish) for your ...



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