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13

Skiing is a sport where taking lessons pays off very quickly. Skiing is not an inexpensive sport: a lift ticket, lessons and rentals will cost you several hundred, but if you set aside about 3-5 days, with half day lessons for at least 3 days you should be pretty satisfied that you've cover all of the basics and evolved beyond the basic snow-plow. If you ...


11

I strongly recommend you purchase, borrow, or possibly rent a proper ski jacket and pants. Given that you don't have a ski jacket I'm guessing that you are a relative beginner. It is likely that you might be falling down quite a bit. One thing to consider is does your jacket give you good mobility? If it does not, you could very easily expose your waist ...


10

First - Assess the situation and determine if an active rescue is possible and safe. Many would be rescuers are caught or killed in follow up avalanches because they acted without assessing the surrounding conditions. Assuming you have equipment to assist in the rescue follow the guidelines below. Yell to alert your partners and other people that may be ...


10

Motorcycle helmets should not be used as a replacement for a ski helmet: Most motorcycle helmets weight between 1,000 and 2,000 grams, while ski helmets weigh between 330 and 600 grams. You are expected to fall repeatedly with ski helmets (on the order of up to several times a day), so it needs to be lighter to not exact an additional toll on your neck ...


10

First, see my comment above. Get some professional instruction. Seriously. To answer your points directly: Build a snow anchor, then transfer the load to your anchor. Holding your partner's weight for the entire duration of a self rescue would be a bad idea. Building an anchor is independent of what your partner is doing. Always build an anchor. On ...


8

No, it's not vital to have thermal underwear. Layering is your friend. During the winter months, I've been hitting the slopes regularly for the past 8 years or so. Though I do own thermal underwear, I've rarely had to use them. What I normally do is simply layer my clothes and then add/remove as needed to be comfortable. The downside to this approach is ...


8

I don't have the time to give a truly complete answer here, but a good choice for you might be metal edged, waxless, backcountry cross-country skis. Other options might include: Snowshoes (which you don't like) Telemark or Alpine Touring skis (which are heavy, and downhill focused) Postholing (no fun) XC skis are far lighter than a telemark setup (~1.6kg, ...


7

Every ski resort gives lessons, and that's how you should begin. You can rent skis, and they will help you get them on, etc. Dress in clothes you would wear to go sledding. Remember that you work hard, get wet, then sit still. Layers, of wool and acrylic will keep you warm when wet and let you adjust as needed. Cotton makes you cold when wet, so avoid ...


7

Learn to inline skate/rollerblade. Seriously, learn to rollerblade first. Many techniques that you apply to roller blading also apply to skiing, the two activities are very similar, all that varies really is the surface. I roller bladed for a number of years before I first learned to ski, and my ski instructor said that roller blading can help pick up ...


6

Ski wax, like many subtle aspects of sports, is subject to a lot of lore. While there is strong science behind wax, the details of how it affects your daily ski trip is hard to pin down. That said, there are several situations that cause me to re-wax my skis (and we are talking about PTEX based alpine-style skis here, with a melted-in base wax, rather than ...


6

If you are a powder skier, you will quite likely manage an entire two week ski holiday on one waxing (assuming the temperature stays pretty consistent) If you like something a bit more extreme, perhaps with some hard ice, rocks or other solid objects then you may want to wax them each morning. @JLundberg's rule of thumb is pretty applicable for both these ...


6

The biggest factor for the waxing is to make sure you have the right wax on your skis for the temperature outside. That is what you should look for when choosing a wax. If you use the wrong temperature wax it will slow you down. As a rule of thumb you should wax every time you can feel grooves in the base of your ski. It smooths out the base of your skis ...


6

Various anti-fog products will work. I actually use the Rain-X anti-fog fluid (I had it for the car anyway and tried it successfully) You just need to clean the inside thoroughly, then apply it and it should last an entire season.


6

In winter your worse enemy is sweating. It is really hard to deal with it once you are sweating. An appropriate thermal underwear will help evacuating sweating instead of retaining it. This been said, an appropriate winter jacket is also essential to keep you warm and also evacuate the sweating from the the internal layers. It is not necessary to pay a ...


6

Skiing is a full-body, high endurance, activity. Being in good cardio-vascular shape is important, and can be achieved through running, swimming, rowing, etc... This can not be over-emphasized. Get your heart in shape. Assuming you already are in decent shape, here are some exercises that will help you get through those initial days on the hill. I've chosen ...


6

Presuming you do not have Amateur Radio licenses, or similar qualifications, you are then limited to various unlicensed options. The answer will then vary by region, but as you mention Canada, your best bet will be to use the GMRS/FRS (General Mobile Radio Service / Family Radio Service) which as basically replaced the old CB and walkie-talkie bands for ...


6

For most people, having a shop do the mount is a hassle-free and relatively inexpensive way to mount bindings. Shops will often mount the ski "on the line" but many will mount it to your basic specifications. Why mount yourself? In my experience, the main reason someone would choose to mount their own ski bindings is that they want to mount older but still ...


6

Here are a few quick and easy ones: Squats will be the most useful. Not exactly at your desk, but you can definitely do it next to your desk. Seated leg raises. Keeping your legs straight, hold the side of the chair and raise and lower your legs Calf raises. Put your weight on your toes and lift yourself up. You don't need to raise far, just get your heels ...


5

Don't ski alone. If you do fall in one of these, it will be much more difficult to get out on your own than if you have some help. Obviously, being aware of what these traps look like can help you avoid them. When you do see one, take the necessary precautions and investigate it. How far from the trunk do you need to be to be safe? I already purposefully ...


5

10 inches of snow will give you 1 inch of water. Lets say you need to fill your container half way full to get a cup of water, well that means you're going to have to fill it full 5 times to get that cup, melting it each time. I usually budget about 4-5 times the fuel in the winter than I use in the summer. You can speed things up by pouring a bit of ...


5

I've heard from numerable places that when climbing Denali, plan on a cup (About .25 L) of white gas per person per day. I would say that this should be a good rule of thumb for your trip as well. You might be able to get away with a bit less, but this is at least a good rule of thumb. You probably won't need this much, but it's a good rule of thumb still. ...


5

This is a fairly subjective thing, but I think you may be a good candidate for a pair of simple Telemark skis, configured in a ski touring fashion. The advantages for you: Telemark bindings fit nearly any alpine-style ski, so you have many options for length and width to fit your height and weight. Telemark setups are typically very lightweight, challenged ...


5

Ventilation is your friend. I hate to say it - but the glasses I've found that have this dialed are usually a little more expensive. After suffering through fog, wind sheer, and poor optics, I found a high end pair of glasses in the back-country, and my eyes were opened. As a second option, removing your glasses immediately when you stop (or even sliding ...


5

As far as I know there are no legal nor cultural barriers to stop you :) Regarding warmth, if you can put a few layers under it I think you should be fine. And if the weather proves to be too cold, you can always buy a new jacket when you are there.


5

There are a variety of important features that your leather jacket will lack compared to a ski jacket. Borrowing or buying a ski jacket from a thrift shop would definitely be worth it. Skiing is pretty physically intense. If it's not very cold (above 20?), you'll sweat, and most ski jackets don't actually have much insulation as they're designed to block as ...


5

Telemark -- where the toe is attached, and the heel is free to rise up and down -- allow skiers to skin up back-country slopes with a more natural and efficient stride. However, AT (or randonee) rigs allow skiers that ability while doing alpine turns on the way down. So, in this day and age, why do people still Telemark: A different way to enjoy the ...


5

You have several options for keeping your toes warm, but ultimately, toes are going to get cold on really cold days... it is just part of the fun. Try the following: Unbuckle your boots while riding up a lift (or stoppping to rest in the back-country) -- this allows circulation to more freely access your toes. Wiggle your toes within your boots to keep ...


4

No answers yet, so I'll put in my 2 cents. A more aggressive edge (3+ degrees) bevel will cut into ice better, improving turns, but making the skis more itchy (squirrel-y?). A less aggressive edge (0-1 degree) won't bite as easily, but wears down slower and is more comfortable to ride for beginners. The base bevel and side bevel can both be changed, but ...


4

Looks like a bit of Googling found the answer I was after... I'm not 100% sure this is definative, but it does suggest that search and rescue is free. http://www.vagabondjourney.com/travelogue/iceland-search-and-rescue/ Can anyone else confirm this?


4

Yes, you can get away with just grip wax on flatter sections, assuming the weight of the pull is not too much. I regularly pull an infant in a similar configuration using just grip wax, even climbing small hills (legs akimbo), total weight is probably about 30lbs, but I know others with older kids that are pull closer to 50lbs.



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