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11

It's not recommended to use a kayak or "CE/EN 1385" helmet for skiing. However, you can use a skiing or "CE/EN 1077" helmet for kayaking. The helmets are manufactured and tested for specific conditions. A skiing helmet is for "faster speed" impacts and colder conditions. In contrast a kayak helmet is of course created for "slower speed" impacts and warmer ...


9

I am willing to take the time to learn what I need to, so I don't want to go with the "easier to use at first" option. If you really mean that, then you can't not try skiing. There are many trails in Colorado where it is no easier to go uphill on snowshoes than to go uphill on skis, given even modest technique on skis -- but with even the smallest ...


8

If you have no experience with either, then I recommend getting some snowshoes first (I'm not recommending you don't eventually get into everything else as well). There are many different styles of snowshoes out there, the most popular types on the market are the hiking snowshoes with the crampons, but if you're going cross country on flat terrain, then you ...


6

I believe the answer to your specific question is no; the only boots I know of with tech fittings are hard boots made of plastic or carbon fiber. However, I think you may be underestimating those boots. AT boots are hard plastic but can still offer a soft feel. Transitioning to skinning uphill consists of not just unlocking the heels but also switching ...


6

The cheapest ways to try cross country skiing are borrowing equipment, yard sale equipment, craigslist, or rentals. If you like it, and rent frequently, that stops being cheap. If you make friends who run or are otherwise active, ask around, and someone might have a spare set of skis and poles they can lend you - you can find them for a few dollars at yard ...


5

There seem to be many widespread assumptions about helmet design, particularly regarding how well they handle multiple impacts. The poor availability of the relevant standards documents[0] does not do much to help this. As others have mentioned, relevant helmet standards include EN 1385 (for kayaks and whitewater sports) and EN 1077 (alpine skiers and ...


5

As the protection required in these activities differ, there are different standards for helmets: EN 1385 for kayaking and EN 1077 for skiing. There are of course even more norms for other helmets. So technically, you need a helmet that fulfills both these norms. I am not aware of a helmet that has both norms. I do however use a Kong Scarab, which fulfills ...


4

Snowshoeing is ridiculously easy, will get you everywhere, and is quite cheap. Where I live you can rent them for the entire season for, IIRC, 60$. Cross-country skiiing (off trail, that is) require knowing how to actually ski, and also specific material, like cross-country bindings, possibly shoes (with insert). I don't know much about cross country ...


4

There are two basic designs for bindings for ski-touring: tech/Pin bindings and frame bindings. All examples given are not a generally representative sample as they base on my experience here in Switzerland, where Diamir and Dynafit dominate the market with a recent increase in marker bindings (but mostly in freeriding). Frame Bindings These are similar ...


4

What you might want to look at getting are some randonee boots and some Dynafit bindings. They're designed more for racing up ski hills than they are coming down, but still do a good job on the quick descent. Randonee Boots: They aren't super soft, you're never going to get the control you want on the down hill with super soft boots alpine boots, you'd ...


3

This is why most snowboarding and skiing gloves these days have a wiper built in. Rain-X and other coatings can help a little, but there appears to be no all purpose solution, so just get a pair of gloves with a wiper, and get used to using it frequently.


3

When you should wax your skis: If you are a racer, ideally every time you race If you do freestyle, once at the start of the year, end of the year, and in-between when needed (see 4-6) If you ski powder, once per week or when needed (see 4-6) Whenever there is a noticeable snow (dry or wet) or temperature change (5-10 degrees Celsius) If your bases get ...


2

It is possible to get the gear relatively cheap. Search on ebay or the kind. Search on internet forums where outdoor enthusiasts hang around and offer their used gear on a market place. I know such forums for Germany and Austria but I am sure you will find the kind in Canada too. I have to say I trust those guys more compared to ebay because I think there ...


2

The benefit to telemark sking is being able to go anywhere you want easy and skiing down sick lines. You can tele turn or alpine turn on tele's. You can fly off back country cliffs then hike back up and do it again. Plus all the gear is lighter. Then after you ski, whether it's the back country or the ski area, you can go apr├Ęs ski in your boots then drive ...


2

According to the article by Iceland Review (mentioned in a comment to Simon Hodgson by Paul Lydon), presently (summer 2015) there is no regular charge for search and rescue in Iceland. In exceptional cases, where people have to be rescued from closed roades or were not in real danger, they are charged. Due to a huge increase of S&R calls the teams ...


2

I don't think you can find them anymore, but ~10 years ago Scarpa was selling a light and pretty soft plastic AT boot with toe bellows (like modern telemark boots). They were great for my Dad to transition to AT gear from 3-pin telemarking on leather boots. On wildsnow.com they have a pretty good write up about them. The heavier version (F3) might be ...


1

I ride a lot and have never seen any gadgets for fixing this. It depends on the snow as well, since the bigger wetter stuff (so cal / washington mountains) tends to be much more of a problem than the bone dry stuff (co / slc mountains). Worse is that in conditions with lots of snow coming down you may want to wear goretex shell mitts, and regardless you'll ...


1

The two main skiing traditions are nordic & alpine. What we now term alpine skiing was refined in europe, even though there is concrete evidence that it may have originated in asia. Alpine skiing has gone through many changes in technique, but generally speaking: the boot is fixed to the ski at the heel and toe, and turns are performed with the legs ...



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