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64

When talking about fresh, dry clothes then it's not true. More layers definitely equals warmer! As pointed out in the comments if you really go to extremes then more layers doesn't necessarily equal warmer, but to get to that point you have to really cram yourself in the bag so there's no insulating air between the layers. You could also make yourself so ...


22

Possibly. the reason this is a consideration is best way to stay warm is with loose layers (multiple depending on the temp) that trap air pockets close to the body that are heated BY the body. if you are in your birthday suit you will trap a decent larger pocket of air around you. BUT a single sleeping bag will NOT keep you warm this way. if you go this ...


21

Sadly, in North America, there is no rating beyond what each manufacturer decides for itself. I suspect that in the US especially, some thought goes into liability (i.e. if someone freezes to death in a bag that's rated to 0F and it's 20F out, they could be in trouble). Certain manufacturers gain a reputation for conservative ratings, others for optimistic ...


21

It is used to store the sleeping bag, in order to retain the loft. It is not a good idea to store your sleeping bag compressed as small as possible as this will damage the fill. This is very important with down, a little less with synthetic but overall it is crucial to the life of the sleeping bag. A couple things to remember are you want to ensure the ...


19

Some sleeping bags come with a larger sack which does not unnecessarily compress the sleeping bag. So you might get a linen bag of around 50l volume (depends on the size and type of the sleeping bag). Furthermore, it is best to store it in a dry place, especially if it's a sleeping bag with down stuffing.


18

The answer is very dependent on the prevailing weather conditions where you are active, and what your budget is Synthetic Advantages: Lower overall price. Maintains thermal properties when wet. Does not reduce loft in high-humidity/ sweaty sleeping conditions. Easier to clean. Disadvantages: The loft does not last as long as down (3-5yrs vs 8-10yrs) ...


17

When I bought my sleeping back from the scouts I was told not to store it in its stuff sack for long periods, and instead to hang it on a coat hanger so that it doesn't get compressed. I was also told to stuff it into the bag rather than roll it as that way the bits that get squashed when compressed are different each time.


16

For hiking with a backpack I would recommend the following considerations: Weight I would go as light as possible. Generally the lighter you go the more expensive you go, but on those long treks it will make a huge difference. Temperature Rating A good 3-season bag is generally at the 20 degree mark. Shape Since you will be trekking with this, definitely ...


15

Two considerations: Layers should be loose and non-constricting so as to allow good circulation. Too many layers can get tight. Also, day clothes will be damp, even if you think they aren't. Air them before bringing them into your bag if it is cold.


14

How cold are you talking about? When you woke up, was there ice on your tent? Or was it 50F outside? Anyways, to sum it up, sleeping bags generally boil down to this tradeoff: Pick Two: Warmth, Small Size, Low Cost If you are car camping, you should be able to find sleeping bags that will go down to 15F for $50-$75, but they will occupy well over 40-50 ...


13

The procedure is roughly the same for both Down and Synthetic, however down requires special precautions: Never dryclean. Wash by hand in a bathtub, or use a front-loading washing machine on gentle cycle. Down bags have thin baffles inside that keep the feathers partitioned. Agitators will put enough stress on the bag you risk tearing those baffles ...


12

Basically it boils down to "less weight for the same insulation" in favour of the mummy type for two reasons: In a blanket type bag you have more or less two insulating sheets, one on top and one below your body. For a mummy type maybe a bit more than the area of one of those sheets would be enough to wrap your whole body. This already reduces weight and ...


11

Only in contrived or extreme examples does wearing less clothing about your body in fact make you warmer when camping. The areas where I might consider it warmer to not wear clothing inside a sleeping bag are: Insufficient ground insulation when sleeping on solid ice or where you have no other viable insulation. In this case, it might make more sense to ...


10

I’m not sure where this came from, but I can assure you that on some nights people are glad to put on whatever extra layer of clothes they find in the backpack! In other words, according to my experience there is no paradox and more clothes equals warm night.


10

When you put the bag into a compressing sack, the insulation fibers take some damage. (Synthetic fibers are less resistant in this regard than down.) The longer and harder you compress the insulation, the more damage; the insulation slowly loses loft and gets "colder". Therefore it's best to keep the sleeping bag hanging or lying freely, possibly in a bigger ...


10

The breed of dog will make a difference, but most "backpacking" dogs will do just fine in the open or under the tarp with you. A dog's metabolism works differently than humans, and they generate a lot more body heat. Consider sled dogs that stick their nose under their tail and sleep through a driving blizzard (and sled dogs usually aren't the thick-fur ...


9

I'm going to assume and interpret a little, and forgive me please if I put words in your mouth. What you really seem to be asking is: "Do I have to spend mad cash to stay warm?" I would say, in 50F (10C), certainly not! With each item, I give my "cheap", and "good but costly" options (I have no associations with any company) Make sure you have a ground ...


9

My experience tell me this: sleep naked always if there's no sign of a possible avalanche. I've been in many high altitude expeditions in three Continents and have explored many vertical and horizontal caves and underground systems. Sleeping bags are best when they're good. Don't try to get a cheap offer and trade it for your safety or comfort. In ...


9

I generally sleep naked in my sleeping bag. Ive slept nights where I went to sleep in my clothes, and then woke up because my feet were freezing in the middle of the night, so I took off my clothes and when back to bed, and then woke up at dawn toasty warm. And nights where I didn't do that in the same exact conditions, and suffered the night. And these are ...


8

One of the main questions is choosing between down and synthetic filling. Down bags are much lighter, they last longer because the down takes less damage when compressed, and they are generally warmer. They have two downsides: they are more expensive and the down quickly loses its insulating properties when wet. If you have the money to buy a down bag, I ...


8

There is more than one reason, which makes you feel warmer sleeping with less clothes (even if it's perfectly dry): It's the same deal as with mittens, which are warmer than gloves. When you wear a lot of clothes, there is additional separation between the parts of your body and more exposed surface. More surface means more heat transfer from the body to ...


8

First of all, check the label for directions. I have a synthetic bag. I take it to the laundromat and wash it in a sufficiently large front-load machine, using cold water and somewhat less detergent than a normal load. I put it in a large dryer set to low or no heat until it seems mostly dry. Then I hang it up indoors for a day or two to finish drying. ...


8

A sleeping bag is like any other purchase, you'll get exactly what you pay for! Unfortunately, sleeping bags are used in many different situations/climates. A sleeping bag you carry and use in the summer months when the lower temperatures are 60 or 70 degrees at night, won't begin to work when you camp in the fall/winter/spring and the temperature lows are ...


7

I get far too hot but like you I find that layer part of the night gets cold. My solution in temperate climates is to only ever zip the sleeping bag up halfway so the top half is left loose, that way I can pull it over me or off again without waking up. If it is a wee bit cooler you could try this technique as well as a thin sheet or blanket.


7

Plenty of places sell sleeping bag liners. Sometimes they are designed to make the bag warmer, other times to be more absorbent. For example, Mountain Equipment co-op sells quite a few, some of which are cotton and mention "absorbency" and "comfort" in their descriptions. I don't doubt that other suppliers offer them too.


7

I have not encountered a situation where a sleeping bag was "too warm" and I was unable to do something about it. I've gone backpacking in the mountains where it was 70 at night one day, and the next day, several thousand feet higher, it got below freezing. At night in the heat, I pretty much just used my sleeping bag as a blanket with the zipper all the ...


6

Guidance that came with my extreme sleeping bags was to randomly stuff, as @Russell commented, trying to use a different pattern each time, and to hang it over a line and give it a good beating when you return home. The small bags they came with seem fine - and they have lasted 10 years+ so far.


6

I think you've covered all the factors except shape. The shape is either rectangular or tapered at the feet (aka mummy). Tapering means less weight and less space to heat with your body, but also a bit less freedom of movement. Rectangular sleeping bags can often be connected together, which is good if you're a couple and want to share body heat (amongst ...


6

Original Poofiness (or OP as they call it in the 'wood) will always be illusive. No matter how you care for your bag, it is on a steady decline toward compression from the moment you buy it. To attempt to re-gain some loft, you need to separate the fill so the fibers or down (or whatever) that are inside can trap more air between them. You can: Shake ...


6

I've only once experienced a nights' sleep that my sleeping bag didn't handle. I was only 200 metre from civilisation, and I hardly slept, but it was not really dangerous. I'd expected temperatures around 0°C, but it turned out to be the local coldest night of the year at -7°C. Normally, the gulf stream means that at Å i Lofoten, Norway, temperatures ...



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