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20

It is used to store the sleeping bag, in order to retain the loft. It is not a good idea to store your sleeping bag compressed as small as possible as this will damage the fill. This is very important with down, a little less with synthetic but overall it is crucial to the life of the sleeping bag. A couple things to remember are you want to ensure the ...


11

Basically it boils down to "less weight for the same insulation" in favour of the mummy type for two reasons: In a blanket type bag you have more or less two insulating sheets, one on top and one below your body. For a mummy type maybe a bit more than the area of one of those sheets would be enough to wrap your whole body. This already reduces weight and ...


8

The breed of dog will make a difference, but most "backpacking" dogs will do just fine in the open or under the tarp with you. A dog's metabolism works differently than humans, and they generate a lot more body heat. Consider sled dogs that stick their nose under their tail and sleep through a driving blizzard (and sled dogs usually aren't the thick-fur ...


7

Plenty of places sell sleeping bag liners. Sometimes they are designed to make the bag warmer, other times to be more absorbent. For example, Mountain Equipment co-op sells quite a few, some of which are cotton and mention "absorbency" and "comfort" in their descriptions. I don't doubt that other suppliers offer them too.


7

I get far too hot but like you I find that layer part of the night gets cold. My solution in temperate climates is to only ever zip the sleeping bag up halfway so the top half is left loose, that way I can pull it over me or off again without waking up. If it is a wee bit cooler you could try this technique as well as a thin sheet or blanket.


6

We did some research on this once and the results were kind of sad. For major backpacking brands of sleeping bags (say, Marmot or Big Agnus) the major differences between sleeping bags for the two genders were these: Women's sleeping bags were slightly smaller. A bag that is listed as a '20-degree bag' for woman would listed as a '10-degree' bag for men. ...


6

I have not encountered a situation where a sleeping bag was "too warm" and I was unable to do something about it. I've gone backpacking in the mountains where it was 70 at night one day, and the next day, several thousand feet higher, it got below freezing. At night in the heat, I pretty much just used my sleeping bag as a blanket with the zipper all the ...


5

I've only once experienced a nights' sleep that my sleeping bag didn't handle. I was only 200 metre from civilisation, and I hardly slept, but it was not really dangerous. I'd expected temperatures around 0°C, but it turned out to be the local coldest night of the year at -7°C. Normally, the gulf stream means that at Å i Lofoten, Norway, temperatures ...


4

The "X chamber" construction is the most simple way to enclose the filling into chambers: the inner and outer fabric are just quilted together, forming tubular chambers that are filled with loft material, as it is known from most down jackets. In contrary the other chamber constructions are built in a way that the chambers have some overlap of loft material ...


4

Cotton is the dominant bedding material choice worldwide for several reasons and as long as you aren't getting into the bag drenched and have adequate water control for your environment, I can't see the lining choice being a make or break factor in warmth. I can see it making the bag much more comfortable for casual use. Furthermore, for winter camping in ...


4

Some of us, when adventuring, go to far off remote places, in very cold or wet areas, and carry everything with us on our backs. But not everyone does that. Some people only car camp, in the summer, where bathrooms and showers are 200 feet away. For those sorts of camping situations, people's needs in a sleeping bag are essentially nothing more than ...


4

There are two problems with this question: Night-time temperatures vary a great deal across Spain-it is a big country, with coasts, plains and mountains Your ideal temperature may be very different to mine So what you want to do is look at the range of expected temperatures in the area you plan to camp, compare those with temperatures you are comfortable ...


4

It is worth nothing that if you have a cooking system and the extra fuel you can prepare hot water and place the hot water bottle between your legs to help you keep warm. If you have extra food, eat a high-energy snack before going to bed. Other things that comes to mind are: cover your head, use what you can as bottom insulation, make sure you don't ...


4

From a product description: Women-specific performance mummy cut means additional insulation in key areas where women tend to get chilled How much of this is marketing hype is unknown to me. Most female hikers I know did not use a specific women-sleeping bag and did just fine. Many high quality sleep systems I have looked at did not have this ...


4

I don't think it is a huge problem for most people. In a certain sense it is flawed by design; at least if you are concerned by weight saving. You could use a top quilt. If you want extra insulation, you could also get a down-filled sleeping pad such as the DownMat UL. Some bags will have variable filling with less down underneath for that exact reason. ...


4

Warning This is pure conjecture! Test this information with your gear in a safe place before using! That being said, the basic warmth of a sleeping bag is determined by the amount of loft the fill provides. Quality of fill has a huge impact on how much loft is necessary to provide a given warmth, along with construction (i.e. baffles vs sewn through, hood ...


3

There is an Upper Limit and Here's Why There are in fact times when a sleeping bag can be too warm. Although leaving the bag unzipped allows heat to radiate away from your body upwards, the insulation between you and the ground significantly reduces the amount of heat that your body can dissipate. How far you sink into the insulation also has a significant ...


3

If you can settle on purple Nunatak and Feather Friends have good sleeping bags in those colors. One option could be to get a custom made sleeping bag from the cottage industry. Many will accept custom orders although they may not have something available in pink.


3

People falling asleep and dying were already affected by hypothermia, once it happens to you, the only chance is a heat source such as fire or other people, however if you are alone, you will have really problems with making fire in such condition. If your body isn't completely exhausted, you will have great problems falling asleep, if you will be freezing. ...


3

This answer is mostly on comfort, for more technical/practical considerations, please consult Rory's answer above. I can express opinion about this double sleeping bag. Cheap, which affects it's other characteristics. Weights 3.6 kg, takes up most of the space in a large (60+)l backpack. Warmth is about the same as my single 3-season sleeping back. ...


3

Down is actually a pretty durable insulation, and if it is properly cared for will last much longer than any synthetic insulation. Some people use the same down sleeping bag for decades, but there are a lot of variables at play, and maintaining a down sleeping bag is a bit of an art form. When you buy a used down sleeping bag you will want to know: How ...


2

When we get cold vasoconstriction occurs. This prevents the blood at the extremities being subject to heat conduction away from the body. This is not an adaption, this is a reaction. The body emits heat all the time because the body working and but wants to remain at constant temperature. If the ambient temperature is such that we can lose this heat, we ...


2

I went out once with a bag that was too warm. Sometime in the night I woke up covered in sweat and freezing cold! My sweat had soaked the down, completely ruining its insulation properties. If you want to go outdoors all year round then you just have to accept that you'll be buying twice the gear. A summer pack and a winter pack. A summer sleeping bag and a ...


1

My answer will assume we are talking about a quilt. You can get down quilts that are made of exactly the same material as a mummy bag (Pertex Quantum face fabrics with 800+ fill down). Most quilt users that are going into colder climes will add a down balaclava to keep their head warm. Futhermore, quilts are often cut in the same shape as a mummy bag (on ...


1

What hasn't been mentioned so far is that different materials have different ranges. A down sleeping bag is usually comfortable over quite a larger temperature range than a synthetic one. I have a flimsy synthetic liner bag (they are also available in silk, but this one claims to be microfiber) that at least avoids draft when the regular bag is better open ...


1

Woman's body generally produces less heat. So if sleeping bag is labeled as being for women, it will be thicker (and more expensive) having the same comfort zone as the model for men. Another difference is the consequence of the first. Producing less heat, women are more likely to have cold feet, so they need thicker insulation in lower part of sleeping ...


1

From my experience - no way. If the temperature outside is below the comfort range of your sleeping bag, you'll have to put some extra things on you, otherwise you risk hypothermia (in best case - sleepless night). The best things are the fleece ones. However, when it goes to trousers and jackets (normal or rain-proof, without warming), it's usually a ...



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