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21

It is used to store the sleeping bag, in order to retain the loft. It is not a good idea to store your sleeping bag compressed as small as possible as this will damage the fill. This is very important with down, a little less with synthetic but overall it is crucial to the life of the sleeping bag. A couple things to remember are you want to ensure the ...


12

Basically it boils down to "less weight for the same insulation" in favour of the mummy type for two reasons: In a blanket type bag you have more or less two insulating sheets, one on top and one below your body. For a mummy type maybe a bit more than the area of one of those sheets would be enough to wrap your whole body. This already reduces weight and ...


7

I have not encountered a situation where a sleeping bag was "too warm" and I was unable to do something about it. I've gone backpacking in the mountains where it was 70 at night one day, and the next day, several thousand feet higher, it got below freezing. At night in the heat, I pretty much just used my sleeping bag as a blanket with the zipper all the ...


7

That lean-to in the link looks like it would shelter from all but the most wind driven rain. If you pack a cheap vinyl poncho that should take care of most situations. They are light enough that you can pack a second. What is the temperature rating on your sleeping bag? 15F/-10C will probably be more than warm enough. If you are carrying a summer bag, you ...


6

I emailed Feathered Friends and PHD about this issue. I only got a reply from FF so far: A compression bag greatly reduces the size of a sleeping bag. There is no limitation to compressing down, as long as the down is not being stored compressed for an extended period of time, It will not be damaged.if you are taking it out and using it everyday. ...


6

The answer might be already hidden in the answer to this question: In the US, there seems to be no standardized norm for sleeping bags, i.e. every manufacturer can write onto the label whatever they want – which can be more or less realistic... Basically this means that they will possibly write the most impressive number onto the label they think they can ...


5

First of all, I will just spread some ideas. I never did a winter bivi by myself. Please don't blindly trust my words. But... because I am interested in the idea and like to do something similar in future, I searched for some info which might help you (and me). Still I am looking forward for better answers (which are based on experience and real ...


5

IMO you totally don't need a tent. Plenty of people, including me, prefer to sleep out under the stars even if there's no hut. It can be difficult to sleep with a wind blowing across one's face, but that won't be happening inside the hut. It's also off the ground, so you won't be losing heat into the dirt. Yes, the temperature inside will be the same as ...


5

We used Outdoor/Indoor Protective Flooring interlocking Mats inside the tent ($20) (above ground sheet) insulates, soft enough to sleep on. Toddlers like this from experience (good for naps too) thermal rest (roller mat) $30 -$200 each depending on climate Baby can sleep with lots of cotton blankets wrapped up This mother blogs about it ...


5

There is an Upper Limit and Here's Why There are in fact times when a sleeping bag can be too warm. Although leaving the bag unzipped allows heat to radiate away from your body upwards, the insulation between you and the ground significantly reduces the amount of heat that your body can dissipate. How far you sink into the insulation also has a significant ...


5

I cannot tell you whether it is normal for your level of use, but it is perfectly normal to happen at some time. What you describe sounds like common clotting of the feathers due to the influence of moisture and pressure in use over time. When you detect this very early, shaking and crushing the bag may be enough to restore loft. If this is not the case, ...


5

Buy an Overbag. Use the Overbag when it's too warm for your down bag Use the down bag at and around -15C Use the Overbag and Down Bag together when it's colder than -15C AND if you want to get real fancy get a Vapour Barrier Liner and use all three together for expeditions and temps below -30C. You now have all your bases covered! This is much more ...


4

Unfortunately you are limited in your options: use a mat under you and the sleeping bag as a blanket. This will be a lot colder, though buy another bag, perhaps rated to -5 as an alternative. If you have the carrying capacity, it can be simpler to have a lighter sleeping bag plus blankets, so you can adjust the temperature to suit. Or you could go for a ...


4

My answer will assume we are talking about a quilt. You can get down quilts that are made of exactly the same material as a mummy bag (Pertex Quantum face fabrics with 800+ fill down). Most quilt users that are going into colder climes will add a down balaclava to keep their head warm. Futhermore, quilts are often cut in the same shape as a mummy bag (on ...


4

I don't think it is a huge problem for most people. In a certain sense it is flawed by design; at least if you are concerned by weight saving. You could use a top quilt. If you want extra insulation, you could also get a down-filled sleeping pad such as the DownMat UL. Some bags will have variable filling with less down underneath for that exact reason. ...


4

Warning This is pure conjecture! Test this information with your gear in a safe place before using! That being said, the basic warmth of a sleeping bag is determined by the amount of loft the fill provides. Quality of fill has a huge impact on how much loft is necessary to provide a given warmth, along with construction (i.e. baffles vs sewn through, hood ...


4

The "X chamber" construction is the most simple way to enclose the filling into chambers: the inner and outer fabric are just quilted together, forming tubular chambers that are filled with loft material, as it is known from most down jackets. In contrary the other chamber constructions are built in a way that the chambers have some overlap of loft material ...


4

Cotton is the dominant bedding material choice worldwide for several reasons and as long as you aren't getting into the bag drenched and have adequate water control for your environment, I can't see the lining choice being a make or break factor in warmth. I can see it making the bag much more comfortable for casual use. Furthermore, for winter camping in ...


4

Some of us, when adventuring, go to far off remote places, in very cold or wet areas, and carry everything with us on our backs. But not everyone does that. Some people only car camp, in the summer, where bathrooms and showers are 200 feet away. For those sorts of camping situations, people's needs in a sleeping bag are essentially nothing more than ...


4

Over compressing any bag, whether it be down or synthetic, will eventually lead to loft degradation. If you compress your bag too tight you can cause damage to the barbs and barbules of the feathers, which will decrease loft over time, but this is apparently less of an issue with higher quality down. To be honest, I think you would have to have one ...


4

I would say no, it is not normal. I have several sleeping bags, some with as much annual use as your example, which are at least 25 years old and are still good at lofting. Some bags allow the down to move around, which can be handy to cope with warmer conditions. Have you tried fluffing up the bag with gentle shaking to make sure the down is evenly ...


3

If you sleep only in a bivy bag direct on snow you need to have a sleeping bag with a good isolated pad for the temperature in the forecast at least. If you sleep in a well build igloo the temperature is much warmer than the outside. Snow is used because the air pockets trapped in it make it an insulator. On the outside, temperatures may be as low as ...


3

Down is actually a pretty durable insulation, and if it is properly cared for will last much longer than any synthetic insulation. Some people use the same down sleeping bag for decades, but there are a lot of variables at play, and maintaining a down sleeping bag is a bit of an art form. When you buy a used down sleeping bag you will want to know: How ...


2

I went out once with a bag that was too warm. Sometime in the night I woke up covered in sweat and freezing cold! My sweat had soaked the down, completely ruining its insulation properties. If you want to go outdoors all year round then you just have to accept that you'll be buying twice the gear. A summer pack and a winter pack. A summer sleeping bag and a ...


2

You don't mention budget, but a couple things I really like when car camping are: Beautyrest air mattress (about $100). Can be very firm if you like that, and the edges don't collapse like most air mattresses do. It's like a real bed. Does require A/C close by. A tent tall enough to stand in. I'll rough it while backpacking, but I like to be comfortable ...


2

I asked this question to my mother who knows well the quality of down. During your trek, if you compress your down sleeping bag a lot and if it's a very good quality down (90-10 or 95-5), you shouldn't have any problem in your trekking. It's very important when you return home to bring air to your sleeping until your next adventure; hang it in your closet! ...


1

I am not entirely sure if this answers the question at all and if it does then is it in best possible ways. There is no solution to this unfortunate and freaking situation. Whatever you do, it is gonna bite you the moment you move. Although, one should consider covering own face (and, NOT the snake's face :D) by hands so that he/she may have a better ...


1

We car-camped with our 5 month old using a yoga mat as a sleeping pad wedged in above our heads in a two person backpacking tent. It was summer and in California, so we weren't worried about moisture from touching the sides. We were worried about having him sleeping in anything too soft, because that's against the recommendations for infants (suffocation, ...


1

What hasn't been mentioned so far is that different materials have different ranges. A down sleeping bag is usually comfortable over quite a larger temperature range than a synthetic one. I have a flimsy synthetic liner bag (they are also available in silk, but this one claims to be microfiber) that at least avoids draft when the regular bag is better open ...


1

Just stating the obvious, you should consider where and when you are hiking. Death Valley and the Appalachin trail offer extremely different environments. I have multiple different sleeping bags for different occassions. In the summer, I generally use a 45 degree down bag. In spring and fall, I tend to carry a 30 degree bag, and in the winter I carry a 0 ...



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