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11

Being as the bag is synthetic and the water was relatively clean your likely ok to boil wash it and use it again. If it had been down and/or contaminated water I'd strongly recommend binning it. Down would have rotted and you couldn't guarantee getting rid of all of the nasties in contaminated water. Caveat(s) It's not going to be like brand new. The ...


8

It's a novel idea, but it's not going to work in any practical sense. Most of those foams take about 15 minutes to setup, and you'll have to come up with some way to fabricate a mold while you spray it. It will be about an hour before you could safely enter your foam sarcophagus, and if this is to be used in an emergency situation, that's probably not time ...


7

No, it's not going to be feasible: You'd need a lot of cans. To approximate the volume of a sleeping bag and thermal mat I'd say at least around 5-10 cans. For this weight/volume you can just as well bring a proper sleeping bag/tarp/bivvy. The spray foam is not stable in itself. It will form bubbly clouds of foam, so you'd need a mold. This is not easy, ...


6

Depending on where you are camping I would recommend a three or four season synthetic sleeping bag. Synthetic bags are generally cheaper and bulkier than down bags for an equivalent warmth. As you are car camping the additional bulk isn't that important. Most of Spain has night temperatures between 5-0 C this time of year so a three season bag should be ...


5

Aside from layering your clothes inside your bag, or layering your bag using a bag liner, it's also important to make sure you have a good ground sheet or sleeping pad that will insulate you against the ground and reflect your body heat back up. You lose a lot of body heat into the ground while sleeping, so at the very least, using a survival blanket as a ...


5

You covered it already—layers. This is actually a very common technique among ultralight backpackers. They will often intentionally bring a sleeping bag with 5-10ºF less insulation than needed and compensate by wearing all their clothing to bed. If you need to get warm fast, you can do some sit-ups to get your blood moving. You only need to worry about ...


4

There was an old Reader's Digest story, apparently true, where a camper woke up with a very big rattler (as he saw later) coiled on his chest under the sleeping bag. He had trouble communicating to his friends what was happening and the things they tried (I can't remember what, maybe messing with the zipper) just seemed to agitate the snake. They ended up ...


4

A hut like this should at least be dry and reasonably sheltered so you might get draughts but not direct driving winds. This means that you can afford to focus on warmth rather than more general shelter if you are confident that you can reach a hut every night. In this sort of context down sleeping bags are attractive as they offer excellent warmth and ...


4

For a lean-to: Sleeping bag - And other sleeping items for warmth. Ground pad - The floor of the lean-to will chill you almost as quickly as the ground. Also it protects your sleeping bag from dirt, etc. A tarp - This is for hanging across the door if needed to block wind and/or precipitation.


3

Several good tips have already been posted; another to consider is a hot water bottle. I was on a trip for a mountaineering class recently and was surprised by how many people had never slept with a hot water bottle before! Use a solid bottle which won't leak and is designed to handle high temperatures, like a Nalgene bottle. If you're already carrying fuel ...


3

It is possible to clean/repair your bag if it's not too far gone, but buying a new one will be easier, might even be cheaper, and will certainly be better. Options for cleaning slightly mildewy bags include using vinegar or bleach (bleach will likely discolour the bag) and hot water in the wash cycle. If washing the bag and tumble drying doesn't get rid ...


2

In terms of clothing insulation there is the concept of the CLO. The key equation is T = (31 − 0.155·P·R)°C where P is 48 W/m² while sleeping, R is the number of CLOs, and T is the temperature in Celsius. To stay warm while sleeping at 20F you need 5 CLOs (yes there is huge variation between people). If you double the bags and ignore the air gap between ...


2

The impact of compression on loft can come from how long a bag is left compressed, or from the number of times it has been compressed. As the main risk with compression is the breaking of fibers that would otherwise contribute to increased loft, many repeated cycles are more likely to cause trouble. That said, synthetics and down are different. Synthetic ...


1

Have you tried tossing it in a dryer on Air Fluff with some tennis balls, for a little while? Edit: See also suggestions here.


1

I'm not sure that anyone can give you a specific number that will suit your needs. Its worth bearing in mind that the temperature ratings on sleeping bags are created using a somewhat arbitrary test involving a dummy with sensors read more. The good thing about this test is that it creates an objective position from which to judge a sleeping bags insulation ...


1

There can be a slight weight savings for a double bag over two single bags. This is difficult to fully calculate, especially if one person sleeps warmer than the other or if there is a height difference (e.g., one person needs a long bag and the other a short bag). There can also be a comfort advantage, but it really depends on how narrow the double bag is. ...



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