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14

There is hardly anything very effective first aid as such, considering the fact that you are 5 hrs walk from any medical facility. I guess I can assume that you will be roaming in rain forests of Agumbe or anywhere in Southern Western Ghats since you referred to King Cobras. If in India, you would definitely like to take a look at The Big Four. ...


14

When a rattlesnake gets his rattle on, what exactly is the desired reaction it's expecting from you, and what other indicators does it give you that a strike is imminent? It's a warning that it's there, it's not necessarily a warning that it's about to strike (though of course, it could.) Likewise they won't always rattle before they strike. However, ...


12

The concern is valid; your basic plan should be to stay calm and not increase your heart rate. If other options for evacuation are not available, slowly walking yourself out is the best remaining option. The bitten area can swell quite a bit, so remove nearby jewelry or clothing to prevent them from turning into tourniquets. If you have a pen you can use ...


11

If you end up with a snake on your chest while sleeping, you can rest assured that the snake is not in an aggressive mood. It's on top of you because it thinks you're cozy and warm, if it's cozy then it's going to be pretty mild tempered. I imagine you could easily grab it behind the head and take it out of your tent. If you don't want to touch it, just flip ...


10

First of all, you are more likely to hear the rattlesnake than see it. They tend to camouflage themselves quite well, and unless you are paying very close attention, they are easy to miss. I have actually stepped less than a foot from one and not noticed it until I was passing it (It was coiled in a circle, hence my lack of rattle snake bites...) If you ...


9

Part of the reason that people don't die from snake bites is because they take the proper precautions. And while the bite of an adder isn't likely to kill you, it could make your return trip much more difficult. One thing you do not want to do is to try and suck the venom out, or try and wrap a tourniquet around it. These will stop your bodies native ...


8

I hike in generally the same area of the country, mostly on the AT around NC and VA. Snakes in this area will be most active during spring and fall months. Generally they will be more active in moderate temperatures. In extreme cold and extreme heat you'll see less snakes. In the summer they will be more active in the early mornings and evenings. During ...


8

When bitten by a rattlesnake: keep the patient still. keep the body part/limb bitten below the area of the heart. do not constrict blood flow, remove jeweler, other articles of clothing, accessories that might restrict blood flow. get to a hospital as fast as possible, if at all possible. do NOT cut the bite and attempt to suck the venom do NOT apply a ...


7

First, to directly answer your question: no, don't run. Running increases your heart rate, which increases how fast the venom will be spread through your body. It also increases the likelihood of another injury such as a twisted ankle, which would further delay treatment. Your first priority is to distance yourself from the snake and any of its friends. ...


6

As you specifically mentioned Southern Nevada Mojave Desert, if you come across a snake and considering the worst case its a venomous snake, then its very likely to be a Rattlesnake or a Side Winder or an Adder. The best way to avoid trouble with venomous reptiles is to be aware of your surroundings and observe some rules for your own safety. Most bites ...


5

It's always best to back off and walk around it. Rattlesnakes can strike very fast and far. I find that the bigger problem with snakes in common is that you step close to one unexpectedly. Most of the time they strike out of reflex when you almost stand on them, like for instance in bushes or below large stones where you step over.


4

It would be unusual for a snake to attack a stationary person. I suppose it's possible that a snake might approach you or your shelter to try to get warm, and you could then surprise them after they had already settled down near you. I'm guessing there is no coyote season in Nevada, so you could be doing it any time of year. If it's the winter, snakes are ...


4

I'm no herpetologist, but in my experience, snakes are in the "you don't bug me, I won't bug you" category. If you're sitting in a blind and are still, you aren't likely to surprise them. Surprising a snake or making it feel endangered is what causes most bites. If you're still, they'll tend to just pass by without bothering you, and will likely detect you ...


4

Mate, I am so glad to know that you and your daughter are safe. First, Rattlers are often found under rocks and logs, particularly if the temperature doesn't suit them. So instruct your kids and other concerned people about it. Rattlesnakes are typically capable of striking up to a distance equal to 1/3rd to half of their overall length, although longer ...


3

Ahh, I have been waiting for this. This answer would definitely be not much of a help if you hate complicated biology and physiology and related terms. But anyone who is equally interested in snakes is welcome to have a read through. While I am really sorry that I can't simply answer it as these many months or these many years, what I can explain here is a ...


3

As with any wild animals, different species and different individuals are going to respond differently in different situations. Some snakes are extra-ordinarily docile, and no amount of heavy-stomping will disturb them, unless you stomp on them. So, to answer the original question, walking with heavy footfall is neither foolproof, nor sustainable for ...


3

Medical care is needed immediately. Get it quickly. The Sawyer Kit is actually reported to reduce the severity of bites, but does not replace the need for care. It may buy you some extra time though. Running or other activities that drive your heart rate up aren't generally good. It's kind of hard to keep the heart rate down because your first instinct ...


3

I am not familiar with the reptiles around the world. I can however, share the results of my (informal) research (read: googling) of several years ago. I did that, because I was going alone in the summer forest several hours from help at any time. I discovered a viper incident report, among the many forum statements that snakes in Bulgaria are not deadly. ...


2

I am not entirely sure if this answers the question at all and if it does then is it in best possible ways. There is no solution to this unfortunate and freaking situation. Whatever you do, it is gonna bite you the moment you move. Although, one should consider covering own face (and, NOT the snake's face :D) by hands so that he/she may have a better ...


2

Stop and move away. Generally that's all you need to do. The rattle is a defensive warning. Develop the instinct (and teach your kids to do so as well) that you freeze, locate it, and move in the opposite direction the instant you hear a rattle, and you should be fine.


1

When a snake rattles at you, it wants you to move away from it. Rattlers will warn you first before striking, giving you enough time to move away. My wife and I were hiking once in the desert, she was ahead of me and passed right by a large diamondback snake that was curled up next to the trail. He coiled up and rattled at her, scaring her so that she ...



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