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23

When a rattlesnake gets his rattle on, what exactly is the desired reaction it's expecting from you, and what other indicators does it give you that a strike is imminent? It's a warning that it's there, it's not necessarily a warning that it's about to strike (though of course, it could.) Likewise they won't always rattle before they strike. However, ...


17

Ahh, I have been waiting for this. This answer would definitely be not much of a help if you hate complicated biology and physiology and related terms. But anyone who is equally interested in snakes is welcome to have a read through. While I am really sorry that I can't simply answer it as these many months or these many years, what I can explain here is a ...


17

The best thing to do is just avoid it completely. If you can't go around because the bush is too thick, find a plenty long enough stick and get it off the path. The snake won't chase you, it's just defending itself. Do NOT pick the snake up with the stick, just get a hook on it as best you can and fling it gently off the path.


16

Already some great answers here. TBH, haven't been able to go through all of them, so adding in a short summary as what I do and ask people to follow. Answer to question 1: Thumb rule: Never ever ever ever try to handle a snake. If you don't know what snake it is, whether venomous or not, or a semi-venomous, refer rule #1. If you don't know a snake well ...


9

I basically agree with Escoce's answer but you should give the snake a little more time. In the most cases it tries to avoid you and will flee as soon as you come too near. Escoce: The best thing to do is just avoid it completely. If you can't go around because the brush is too thick. Then find a plenty long enough stick and get it off the path. ...


9

Mate, I am so glad to know that you and your daughter are safe. First, Rattlers are often found under rocks and logs, particularly if the temperature doesn't suit them. So instruct your kids and other concerned people about it. Rattlesnakes are typically capable of striking up to a distance equal to 1/3rd to half of their overall length, although longer ...


6

Stop and move away. Generally that's all you need to do. The rattle is a defensive warning. Develop the instinct (and teach your kids to do so as well) that you freeze, locate it, and move in the opposite direction the instant you hear a rattle, and you should be fine.


5

Response for the question #1: I grew up in an area filled with Prairie Rattlesnakes and in grade school we were taught the following. It always worked for me and during summer vacation it was common to come across a rattler every day. Before reading the steps please be warned that the Prairie Rattlesnake is known to be less aggressive and wants to flee ...


5

Rattlesnakes will generally only strike when provoked. That is the very reason we hear them rattle. Keep in mind a rattler cannot produce more venom quickly, so they too prefer to flee rather than bite. Young snake tend to be more aggressive and do not know how to control their venom. If you hear one close to you, back away slowly. Once far enough away they ...


5

When a snake rattles at you, it wants you to move away from it. Rattlers will warn you first before striking, giving you enough time to move away. My wife and I were hiking once in the desert, she was ahead of me and passed right by a large diamondback snake that was curled up next to the trail. He coiled up and rattled at her, scaring her so that she ...


5

The sound of your walking will usually alert them to your presence. Usually, the only time a snake will attack you is if you step on it, frighten it or do something to provoke it. Most snake bites are on the hands and arms.


4

There was an old Reader's Digest story, apparently true, where a camper woke up with a very big rattler (as he saw later) coiled on his chest under the sleeping bag. He had trouble communicating to his friends what was happening and the things they tried (I can't remember what, maybe messing with the zipper) just seemed to agitate the snake. They ended up ...


4

You don't need to try and avoid snakes, they're already trying their best to avoid you, but if you want to give them ample opportunity to get out of your way, walk with a heavy foot fall. Snakes feel vibrations in the ground, so if you come stomping through the woods they'll do their best to slither out of your path before you get too close. Something that ...


4

The skin of snakes is covered with tough scales, similar to fingernails. On the upper surfaces of their bodies these tend to be approximately round or diamond shaped and on the underside are usually longer bands running across. These scales both provide protection from abrasion and can also help it to grip surfaces it is moving over. On some species the ...


3

To answer the snake part of it, looking at some information on different websites and your vague description about color (dark brown to all shade till black), I can take a few guesses. It can be either of the list below: Northern or Southern Rubber Boa (Charina bottae or Charina umbratica) Western Yellow-bellied Racer (Coluber constrictor mormon) One of ...


3

There are many different cranes, so more details about the color and size would be helpful. It is normal behavior, so I'm not surprised you encountered it. My first thought is a sandhill crane. They're found in California, and have snakes as a regular part of their diet. I'm not sure about the snake part of your question, but will do some research and see ...


3

For what I have known, Crotalus horridus, The Timber Rattlesnake does not swim well. Its not a water snake, though its appearance may resemble other water snakes found in its habitat. An inexperienced person may easily confuse between them. The only reason I think the authorities have preferred that particular area as a potential habitat for a sanctuary of ...


2

Already some very good answers above. Just share my real experience here. I met a rattlesnake once when I was hiking in Arizona at a late afternoon. Lucky that I was able to spot it on trail from some 4~5 feet away, rather than stepped on it (otherwise I might not be able to write this answer). While I stopped and backed off for more safe distance and ...


2

Snakes are usually harmless. This is their habitat, and you shouldn't be intentionally trying to scare them off. Just don't worry about it.


2

I couldn't find an authoritative reference to state that a snake wouldn't do that. The main climbing snake in Texas is the Rat Snake. While one of those could climb into your hammock to cuddle, I doubt they would. At the end of the day it is much easier for a snake to slither into a sleeping bag/tent/boot/etc. than a hammock. Those items are all on the ...



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