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12

The concern is valid; your basic plan should be to stay calm and not increase your heart rate. If other options for evacuation are not available, slowly walking yourself out is the best remaining option. The bitten area can swell quite a bit, so remove nearby jewelry or clothing to prevent them from turning into tourniquets. If you have a pen you can use ...


7

First, to directly answer your question: no, don't run. Running increases your heart rate, which increases how fast the venom will be spread through your body. It also increases the likelihood of another injury such as a twisted ankle, which would further delay treatment. Your first priority is to distance yourself from the snake and any of its friends. ...


5

As you specifically mentioned Southern Nevada Mojave Desert, if you come across a snake and considering the worst case its a venomous snake, then its very likely to be a Rattlesnake or a Side Winder or an Adder. The best way to avoid trouble with venomous reptiles is to be aware of your surroundings and observe some rules for your own safety. Most bites ...


4

I'm no herpetologist, but in my experience, snakes are in the "you don't bug me, I won't bug you" category. If you're sitting in a blind and are still, you aren't likely to surprise them. Surprising a snake or making it feel endangered is what causes most bites. If you're still, they'll tend to just pass by without bothering you, and will likely detect you ...


2

It would be unusual for a snake to attack a stationary person. I suppose it's possible that a snake might approach you or your shelter to try to get warm, and you could then surprise them after they had already settled down near you. I'm guessing there is no coyote season in Nevada, so you could be doing it any time of year. If it's the winter, snakes are ...



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