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34

All the advice I've seen emphasises melting snow before consuming to avoid lowering your core body temperature (rather than, specifically, risking dehydration). If possible, melt the snow using a stove, or alternatively, pack the snow into a waterproof container and keep it in a pocket or your sleeping bag until it melts. News stories such as this one, ...


33

The calories to melt even frozen water are pretty small, and the water gained is certainly greater than that used to aid the use of those calories. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calorie So 1 calorie = 1 degree celcius (roughly with minor variation). Okay easy. Except it takes 30 times that to melt it initially. Screw snow, let's figure on ice cubes. 1 ...


22

Doing it correctly can ensure the temperature of the snow cave maintains around 32°F (0°C) or higher. Its not just about digging the extra hole but how the entire cave is constructed that can make the difference between life and death. Here's the general idea. Of course doing this won't guarantee your safety, but it sure helps. To answer your question ...


17

The easiest way that I know of requires you to have some kind of rope or long straps and to be near evergreen trees. Depending on the strength of the needles and width of the trees limbs take anywhere from 1 to 4 ends of an evergreen tree limb. Be sure to use green wood so they can bend without breaking. Make each section about three times as long as your ...


15

This is really interesting, and I think it might be similar to why we don't generally have snow tires / chains etc as a common item here in stores. Certainly the South rarely gets snow, with Wales, The North and Scotland being more likely to get snow days. From the MET Office: The UK gets on average 33 days of snow fall or sleet a year (1971 - 2000). ...


13

If you don't have a compass or other instruments, it is possible to measure the slope with your two (ski) poles solely. Just hold/stick one pole vertically into the snow. Hold the other one horizontally until it reaches the slope with one end and the first pole with the other end. Now you check the height in which the poles contact each other. If it is at ...


10

In general it really depends on the snow condition. Angle: If it's powder snow you need a quite steep angle (25 degrees and more). If it's icy/ hard/ wind slab snow then you can try it on a less steep (20 degrees) slope. Safety: I would search for a slope where you have a safe run off, if you can't manage do arrest yourself. And also that your runoff is ...


9

As with any relatively unscientific field, there is a lot of lore out there that may have originally had a good scientific foundation, but the restrictions or specific conditions have long been forgotten and the answer takes on a life of its own out of context. The myth about eating snow seems to me to be one of these things. The main point is that it ...


9

You want to leave enough room at the entrance for airflow. If the entrance is totally blocked you could possibly suffocate on the CO2 you breathe out. In addition to the entrance, keep an eye on the air exit at the top so it doesn't get blocked. You can heat the inside significantly with just a candle.


8

To put it simply, carry a compass with you that has a clinometer to measure a slope's angle, set one of your poles down on the slope and place the compass on top of the pole to get a solid reading. If you spend enough time in one area you'll start to become familiar enough with the terrain to remember roughly what the angles are and which routes are the ...


8

I think it's quite similar to skiing because the reason for kick-and-glide is to save energy. Same for snowshoes; try not to elevate the whole weight of the shoe for every step. Of course in deep snow you have to lift the leg including the snowshoe quite high, but not as high as you'd have to not wearing snowshoes. Open the fixture at the back to make the ...


8

I have used them heaps for Rappelling, and am more comfortable using a Snow bollard than any other single anchor. I have seen snow stakes bend under the load of one person, ice screws pull the ice off the rock. I have seen deadmen fail when the knots came undone (might have been incorrectly clipped 'biner) (students on that course got a valuable knot tying ...


7

Best is of course subjective, but overall, given your question and caveats, I would say a good solid winter tent. To elaborate on the alternatives, if you have an assured amount of snow, then you can attempt some form of snow shelter. Building an actual igloo takes quite a bit of practice. Building a snow cave on the other hand is not that difficult, but ...


7

If you can, melt it beforehand - not because of dehydration but because of the obvious; it'll cause you to get rather cold rather quickly! If you can't and it really is an emergency (the only time I'd suggest it might be worth considering) then I haven't found a general consensus on whether it's a good idea, probably because it comes very much down to ...


7

well there are many ways to prevent this, the easyiest way would be to trim the hair between the paws. You can also buy dog-sock to put on the dog, the best way if you have seen dogs running with dogsleds. And if you really dont whant to do eighter of thoose options, you can buy paw-grease or paw-vox like "ice on ice". Hope this will help.


7

In addition to the good answer by Aravona, there are two important reasons: Snow shoes are impractical on steep terrain because they put a lot of stress on your ankles. If you are going to buy equipment for going up snow-covered mountains, there is a much better solution: mountain skis with skins attached. Skins increase the grip tremendously. Example: ...


7

Walking technique You can save energy by not lifting your shoe higher then needed. And also how long steps you take. If it's steep try to make smaller steps to save energy. If you walk with poles use your poles with the correct length and technique as with cross-country-skiing, both for every step, one per step or asymmetric. Path planing I think you can ...


7

Well, the primary difference is that once you've used your ice axe as an anchor, you can't use it to climb with. Also, two anchors is almost always better than one, especially in snow. You never know the exact strength of anchor in snow. While it is possible to improvise a deadman anchor in snow out of almost anything you can wrap a rope around, it's not ...


6

Trekking poles can telescope down and pack away. If you happen to have a shelter that uses trekking poles to hold it up, sometimes you need to be able to set your poles to a different height. Some people also like to lengthen/shorten their poles depending on whether they are going down or up hill. If your shelter doesn't require them, I think the ...


6

Yes, but it will really make you cold. It takes about 30 times more heat to heat water (melt ice) from 31 to 33 degrees (F) than it does to heat it from 33 to 35 degrees. That heat comes from your body if you eat snow.


6

Last weekend after a snow storm in Quebec I camped in the conditions you describe. Around 1 meter of snow, -12°C/10°F during the day -24°C/-11°F during the night. Make a layer of spruce branches ~15 cm/6 inch or more. Also, use a closed-cell foam pad plus an inflatable pad. I slept in US Army bivy sack, US Army cold-weather sleeping bag. This set-up will ...


6

I usually stomp the area with snowshoes until it's reasonably packed, and that's good enough. If it's windy and very cold I may dig down 3-4 feet for protection from the wind. (If you're in the mountains you should have a snow shovel for safety.) A thicker sleeping pad (or two pads) will definitely keep you warmer. When you pack up in the morning, you can ...


6

For hard-packed or icy snow, steel runner sleds are quite fast. You can increase your speed by rubbing wax along the runners (we used candle stubs for this). Also, the heads are flexible and allow for steering.


6

I would consider two items: Trekking poles with large baskets. And if you are looking for a pair of modern snowshoes Consider models which have bars at the rear to elevate your feet during ascent. It is common to use the trekking pole to flip the bar up when required.


6

Lots of mushers will 'candle their dogs'. Use a candle and pass it quickly over the bottom of the paw. The flame singes the hairs between the toes and is harmless to the dog. Practice on your arm hairs to get the speed right. Much faster than trimming. Most dogs hate socks and will chew them off as soon as they can.


6

I am assuming that, as you moved out of the snow field you were also descending, therefore, I think it is more likely you were experiencing altitude sickness and your symptoms reversed as you descended. The presence/absence of snow was purely coincidental. Dehydration contributes to altitude sickness through, lower air density which increases respiration ...


6

You do not provide any evidence that you were actually dehydrated, but only felt dehydrated - I assume you felt thirsty. Symptoms and signs of dehydration are described here in great detail: http://www.ehealthstar.com/dehydration/symptoms-and-signs In short: thirst, dry mouth, fatigue, headache, nausea, decreased skin elasticity, dark urine, sudden loss of ...


6

An unhurdled slip-and-drop would be fatal without a doubt. If this is the case, then maybe you need a belay. However, if the snow is sufficiently deep and soft that you're sinking up to your knees, why is it the case that slipping and being unable to self-arrest is so dangerous? In these conditions, typically you can't even intentionally get going fast ...


6

Three thoughts: If the snow is thigh-high, then you should be either using touring skis or snowshoes to "float" over the snow. You'll expend way less energy. Seriously, I can cover probably 10x-50x the distance (or more) with alpine touring gear or snowshoes in the same amount of time as someone without, and that's regardless of the angle of slope. ...


6

Skiiers have many words for snow. Powder Packed Powder Hard pack Ice Glare Ice (If you dig in, you can catch an edge on ice, but not on glare ice.) Crud (Used to be powder, but then it got warm and partially melted, then it re-froze. You sink through it almost like powder, but it's heavy and hard to ski through.) Corduroy (That's the fresh tracks left by ...



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