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31

All the advice I've seen emphasises melting snow before consuming to avoid lowering your core body temperature (rather than, specifically, risking dehydration). If possible, melt the snow using a stove, or alternatively, pack the snow into a waterproof container and keep it in a pocket or your sleeping bag until it melts. News stories such as this one, ...


29

The calories to melt even frozen water are pretty small, and the water gained is certainly greater than that used to aid the use of those calories. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calorie So 1 calorie = 1 degree celcius (roughly with minor variation). Okay easy. Except it takes 30 times that to melt it initially. Screw snow, let's figure on ice cubes. 1 ...


21

Doing it correctly can ensure the temperature of the snow cave maintains around 32°F (0°C) or higher. Its not just about digging the extra hole but how the entire cave is constructed that can make the difference between life and death. Here's the general idea. Of course doing this won't guarantee your safety, but it sure helps. To answer your question ...


11

The easiest way that I know of requires you to have some kind of rope or long straps and to be near evergreen trees. Depending on the strength of the needles and width of the trees limbs take anywhere from 1 to 4 ends of an evergreen tree limb. Be sure to use green wood so they can bend without breaking. Make each section about three times as long as your ...


8

As with any relatively unscientific field, there is a lot of lore out there that may have originally had a good scientific foundation, but the restrictions or specific conditions have long been forgotten and the answer takes on a life of its own out of context. The myth about eating snow seems to me to be one of these things. The main point is that it ...


8

You want to leave enough room at the entrance for airflow. If the entrance is totally blocked you could possibly suffocate on the CO2 you breathe out. In addition to the entrance, keep an eye on the air exit at the top so it doesn't get blocked. You can heat the inside significantly with just a candle.


7

well there are many ways to prevent this, the easyiest way would be to trim the hair between the paws. You can also buy dog-sock to put on the dog, the best way if you have seen dogs running with dogsleds. And if you really dont whant to do eighter of thoose options, you can buy paw-grease or paw-vox like "ice on ice". Hope this will help.


6

I would consider two items: Trekking poles with large baskets. And if you are looking for a pair of modern snowshoes Consider models which have bars at the rear to elevate your feet during ascent. It is common to use the trekking pole to flip the bar up when required.


6

Last weekend after a snow storm in Quebec I camped in the conditions you describe. Around 1 meter of snow, -12°C/10°F during the day -24°C/-11°F during the night. Make a layer of spruce branches ~15 cm/6 inch or more. Also, use a closed-cell foam pad plus an inflatable pad. I slept in US Army bivy sack, US Army cold-weather sleeping bag. This set-up will ...


6

I usually stomp the area with snowshoes until it's reasonably packed, and that's good enough. If it's windy and very cold I may dig down 3-4 feet for protection from the wind. (If you're in the mountains you should have a snow shovel for safety.) A thicker sleeping pad (or two pads) will definitely keep you warmer. When you pack up in the morning, you can ...


6

Yes, but it will really make you cold. It takes about 30 times more heat to heat water (melt ice) from 31 to 33 degrees (F) than it does to heat it from 33 to 35 degrees. That heat comes from your body if you eat snow.


6

If you can, melt it beforehand - not because of dehydration but because of the obvious; it'll cause you to get rather cold rather quickly! If you can't and it really is an emergency (the only time I'd suggest it might be worth considering) then I haven't found a general consensus on whether it's a good idea, probably because it comes very much down to ...


6

Lots of mushers will 'candle their dogs'. Use a candle and pass it quickly over the bottom of the paw. The flame singes the hairs between the toes and is harmless to the dog. Practice on your arm hairs to get the speed right. Much faster than trimming. Most dogs hate socks and will chew them off as soon as they can.


6

I am assuming that, as you moved out of the snow field you were also descending, therefore, I think it is more likely you were experiencing altitude sickness and your symptoms reversed as you descended. The presence/absence of snow was purely coincidental. Dehydration contributes to altitude sickness through, lower air density which increases respiration ...


5

Trekking poles can telescope down and pack away. If you happen to have a shelter that uses trekking poles to hold it up, sometimes you need to be able to set your poles to a different height. Some people also like to lengthen/shorten their poles depending on whether they are going down or up hill. If your shelter doesn't require them, I think the ...


5

A snow shovel will make your life a lot easier, yes - it gives you the option to dig out snow to use as a windbreak, and to lower the tent a little into the snow, reducing the wind. Digging down a little also lets you reach more packed snow, which makes it easier to provide a flat surface. You shouldn't need any extra insulation under the floor - although ...


5

Best is of course subjective, but overall, given your question and caveats, I would say a good solid winter tent. To elaborate on the alternatives, if you have an assured amount of snow, then you can attempt some form of snow shelter. Building an actual igloo takes quite a bit of practice. Building a snow cave on the other hand is not that difficult, but ...


5

If you get that sort of snowfall, the correct safety procedures include clearing snow every couple of hours. Set your alarm and get out to clear snow - especially from the entrance, but all round if it looks like the tent will get covered. The tents used in the Antarctic are shaped like steep pyramids to help avoid the problem of snow buildup - dome tents ...


5

Building an igloo requires: the right snow training to know what the right snow is a snow knife some practice building the walls so that they taper in yet are supported as you go In the absence of training and practice, which I would posit is very rare, go with a quinzy instead. You dig snow and throw it into a big pile. You let that sit for a bit to ...


5

For hard-packed or icy snow, steel runner sleds are quite fast. You can increase your speed by rubbing wax along the runners (we used candle stubs for this). Also, the heads are flexible and allow for steering.


5

You do not provide any evidence that you were actually dehydrated, but only felt dehydrated - I assume you felt thirsty. Symptoms and signs of dehydration are described here in great detail: http://www.ehealthstar.com/dehydration/symptoms-and-signs In short: thirst, dry mouth, fatigue, headache, nausea, decreased skin elasticity, dark urine, sudden loss of ...


4

The fastest type of sledge really does depend on the type of snow - if it's softer snow then you want a sledge with the greatest surface area, since thin runners will tend to just bog you down, sinking into the snow rather than riding on top of it. The greater surface area will spread your weight out more, meaning you stay on top of the snow. However, on ...


4

If all you want is to go fast, look for something with ridges or raised runners on the bottom so it will have less snow contact. However you may find it hard to steer - it will pretty much just go straight down the hill unless you lean wildly, which may cause you to fall over. $20 The discs are more controllable (in a wild crazy omg I'm flying down a hill ...


4

We have tested many sleds over the years and this one is as dangerously fast as it is classically beautiful. I won't ride this one without a helmet and other protective gear. We live on a mountain and I'll often leave this one in the garage in favor of a cheap plastic torpedo style sled because it's too fast.


3

This NASA web-interface provides a somewhat recent (several days old) interface to global daily snow-maps. From the main page, click on Land (immediately below the map), then click on Snow cover in the drop-down menu that appears. Then, on the right, under "Matching datasets", select "Snow cover - 1 day (Terra / Modis)" and click "Select". This will show a ...


3

I tried these and the best use would be on a alternating field. I mean, a mix of going up and down. It this kind of situation they are hard to beat. Because you don't loose time changing between ski/snowshoes. If the angle isn't too much, they climb really fast. You can also get a slide on flat surface a little bit like cross-country skiing. I'm thinking ...


3

If I get it right, they are using the idea of hunters, who attached a deer skin (fur outside) to the ski (e.g. like this). It's called "камус" and "Steigfell", and I don't know an English word for it. Just like you can pet your cat in one direction and can't do it in the opposite direction, with Steigfell on you can easily glide in one direction (forward) ...


3

Elevation bars are great, but more important are the grips/spikes on the bottom, not just for icy snow, but for fallen wood/exposed roots which are especially slippery in the winter. That traction makes all the difference. Ideally the grips run parallel to the length of the snowshoe, usually to the outside, and an additional grip runs across the toe where ...


3

The most authoritative source I know is the Wilderness Medicine textbook, and it has some very useful information on this problem. Snow is mostly air. Let's say you stuff yourself full of snow. Unfortunately, the snow you eat is mostly air and not water. So it is extremely hard to get fully hydrated because though you get full, when the snow melts into ...


3

There are reported deaths from eating snow during WWII (Eastern Front). I presume due to hypothermia and/or the general poor health of the soldiers concerned. Another site points out that snow is excellent at catching polution. Their reasoning is a bit fuzzy, but as a scientist I agree with their conclusion.



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