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7

I think it's quite similar to skiing because the reason for kick-and-glide is to save energy. Same for snowshoes; try not to elevate the whole weight of the shoe for every step. Of course in deep snow you have to lift the leg including the snowshoe quite high, but not as high as you'd have to not wearing snowshoes. Open the fixture at the back to make the ...


6

Walking technique You can save energy by not lifting your shoe higher then needed. And also how long steps you take. If it's steep try to make smaller steps to save energy. If you walk with poles use your poles with the correct length and technique as with cross-country-skiing, both for every step, one per step or asymmetric. Path planing I think you can ...


2

Search and rescue guy here. It's been a while since I've skied, XC or downhill, but I do plenty of snowshoeing, and they are nothing alike, even with shallow snow. If anything, snowshoeing on shallow or crusty snow is more like using crampons. Just keep your gear tight, with straps pointing out (eg, gaiter strap on left foot is pointing left, straps on right ...


1

If you're not walking on very steep slopes, there is basically no special technique to learn. On steep slopes, you can use many of the same foot techniques as with crampons, and in fact many snowshoes include a type of built-in crampon. Front-pointing doesn't work with snowshoes, however, and I don't think three-o'clock position works either. Snowshoes ...


1

Given your criteria, I would go with bivy sacks. Making shelters from snow (even just tarp covered windbreaks) is energy and time consuming, eating up your already scarce daylight and what little energy you have leftover from hiking/snowshoeing/skiing to camp. A commentary on group size, though: it's almost always a bad idea to go winter mountaineering with ...



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