Hot answers tagged

19

If it is clean, fresh snow, it is safe to drink. This is basically drinking rain water. It hasn't had time to pick up pollutants when it is newly fallen. I live in New England, and kids do this all the time. You get taught early to only do this with white snow. Make sure that the snow is actually clean: the longer it sits, and the more urbanized an area is, ...


12

Pee on it. To keep the water drinkable, you'd want to have the liquids separated but still have good thermal transfer between them. A well equipped traveller will pick his/her thermos bottle and a condom, pee in the condom (ladies would probably do it the other way around), tie the condom and put in the bottle, fill the rest with snow, cap, wait and drink. ...


12

The best way to melt snow is to put it in a bottle inside your jacket under your mid layers while you're on the move and let your body heat melt it. Do not place it against the skin, leave a layer or two between you and the bottle. It's advisable to always leave your bottle in your jacket in subzero temperatures, it can freeze if left in your bag. Melting ...


11

From a water purity point of view the same rules apply for drinking water. What is important though is the temperature. If you drink large amounts of snow at a low temperature (i.e. you don't heat it adequately and just drink it as it melts in your hand) then you may need to be careful. Basically if the temperature is low enough and you're ingesting large ...


10

Check out the website http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/wildcond.htm As of March 3, 2016, the website said this about General Conditions under the heading Wilderness Conditions Be prepared for winter conditions throughout the park. The current snowpack is about 85 - 100% of average for this time of year, depending on location, a significant ...


9

TLDR As long as you can walk normally (using the whole foot not just the toe area) always hold your axe at its head with the blade pointing backwards. More information This depends on the situation you are in. The text from Grivel seems to be a oversimplification. There is not just one technique for ascending and one for descending. There are two basic ...


9

I am willing to take the time to learn what I need to, so I don't want to go with the "easier to use at first" option. If you really mean that, then you can't not try skiing. There are many trails in Colorado where it is no easier to go uphill on snowshoes than to go uphill on skis, given even modest technique on skis -- but with even the smallest ...


8

If you have no experience with either, then I recommend getting some snowshoes first (I'm not recommending you don't eventually get into everything else as well). There are many different styles of snowshoes out there, the most popular types on the market are the hiking snowshoes with the crampons, but if you're going cross country on flat terrain, then you ...


7

As already explained in the other questions, the primary concern is possible contamination. For fresh snow and far from civilization this is very easy to identify: White is good: yellow, brown, ... not so :) Close to roads/industry there might be a non-visible contamination but unlikely to be harmful for occasional consumption (at least in countries with ...


7

I'm from Switzerland and must have used a dozen or so different types of sleds over the years. By far the fastest types I have ever ridden (and still do so ever winter) are 'Rodel' type sleds which are common in Switzerland/Austria/Germany. The steel runners have relatively sharp edges, making it possible to even steer them on frozen snow/ice (to some ...


7

Scandinavia is a good option, the more north you go the better. For me the nature there is more remote, more 'raw' compared to the Alps. So I would think it's comparable with Canada (although I've never been to those regions). If you can choose when to go, why not go during winter time. You can add late autumn and early spring too. In this timespan you ...


6

Physically there are two ways for you to heat up the snow: by heat conduction and by heat radiation. Conduction means you place it somewhere close to your body. It does not matter whether this is directly in your mouth or on your belly, you will lose the same amount of energy. The only option to heat it up without losing additional energy is by radiation, ...


6

These look like common garden spiders, which range from tiny to about the size of a 50 pence piece, and come in colours from yellow through to green. They're common to see between May and November but you can see them later in the year, potentially. However this maybe another species, but these ones are really common. Now usually these spiders will find ...


5

Best thing you can do is find a video on the internet of someone putting them on – same make and model of chains as yours if possible, then practice several times, ideally when it's warm an sunny or in your garage. Its OK to go for a short drive (100meter or so) up and down a quiet street to get the feel of them, but don't go fast – max speed with chains ...


4

Snowshoeing is ridiculously easy, will get you everywhere, and is quite cheap. Where I live you can rent them for the entire season for, IIRC, 60$. Cross-country skiiing (off trail, that is) require knowing how to actually ski, and also specific material, like cross-country bindings, possibly shoes (with insert). I don't know much about cross country ...


4

It's hard to tell without all the details. As a rule of thumb I'd apply whatever was applied to the coat originally. If it didn't have a coating at all then the waterproof spray is likely the best option. The spray is likely going to produce the best result. Wax can discolour and make a jacket stiff. These day's wax is only used on "wax jacket" type coats. ...


4

I am unfortunate in that our weather is warm and wet with a lot of melt/freeze cycles, and have lots of experience dealing with skiing on sheets of ice. here I am using "Ice" loosely to mean anything from true ice to hard packed snow you need razor sharp edges to stay upright and in control. Ice and snowboards don't make for a great day out, so avoiding it ...


3

Very simply: if you eat snow, all the energy that would be melt the snow is energy currently in your body. Lots of heat loss direct from your body. If you put snow in an outer layer of your clothes, then much of the energy that would melt the snow is energy that was in the process of escaping to the outside air. Effectively the snow is capturing some of ...


2

You can have the fastest Rodel (see fgysin's answer), when you come to a bend you'll have to steer and that means braking with one foot, slowing you down overall. So I give you ... the ghosky: You can steer it by leaning to one side making it "carve" like a pair of skis. Youtube video of it in action: ghosky video. Unfortunately it costs more than it ...


2

In my experience, you really don't need either trekking poles or ski poles when snowshoeing. On flat ground or at low angles, I don't find them necessary or useful at all. On very steep stuff, I find that an ice ax is more helpful (along with those mini-crampon things built into some snowshoes). The only time when I've felt like poles would have been at ...


2

Yes, always use poles with baskets. Trekking poles allow adjustability which I find useful in changing snow conditions. ...but to snowshoe without poles? You can do it but it's so much more work and I cover much more distance with. JIMO.


1

Also how do you start a slide to practice this? Go with a friend and randomly push each other over - self-arresting is a lot easier when you expect to fall over. What you really need to practice is how to manoeuvre your body & axe into a suitable arrest position when you're going head first, rolling sideways etc.



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