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13

First - Assess the situation and determine if an active rescue is possible and safe. Many would be rescuers are caught or killed in follow up avalanches because they acted without assessing the surrounding conditions. Assuming you have equipment to assist in the rescue follow the guidelines below. Yell to alert your partners and other people that may be ...


7

Scandinavia is a good option, the more north you go the better. For me the nature there is more remote, more 'raw' compared to the Alps. So I would think it's comparable with Canada (although I've never been to those regions). If you can choose when to go, why not go during winter time. You can add late autumn and early spring too. In this timespan you ...


6

I think the answer is as simple as: If you own a mid-layer wear it to the store when you purchase the shell. If you own a shell wear it to the store when you purchase your mid-layer. If you don't own either purchase them together to ensure best fit. There are several different layering systems find what works for you and try everything on in store. If ...


6

As a rough guide to waterproofness - 5000mm is generally rainproof but won't necessarily stand up well to torrential rain. Around 15000 should be fine in that context. If you go higher than that then you're looking at fabric that can be immersed in water and still stay waterproof for a while, but should be ample for any rain shower that might come along! ...


5

I first learnt snowboarding twenty years ago, when boards and bindings were rigid, the boards were long and asymmetrical, and back then carving was the way to turn. You'd lean right over (sometimes 75-80 degrees over) and the board would carve itself round a turn. Modern boards are much more flexible, and what your instructor means by twisting is that you ...


5

Camber - Where the ski or snowboard creates a slightly concave shape in relation to the snow surface. Better hard snow and ice grip. Makes the board or ski "carve" the snow. Rocker - Where the ski or snowboard has a slight convex shape in relation to the snow surface. Better soft snow lift and float. Makes the board or ski "smear" the snow. Hybrid ...


5

To expand a bit on the good answer already given: Slope - 25-45 degrees is a good broad suggestion, but your region of the country will have a big impact on this. Maritime snow is wetter and stickier, so tends to be most dangerous at steeper angles. Transitional and Continental snow is less wet, so has a most dangerous slope range on the lower end of the ...


4

25-45 degrees of slope. If you can avoid this, you'll avoid most avalanches. New snow or newly wind-loaded snow. Unstable snow that collapses under your feet with a "whump". Pillowy or wavy looking snow. Recognize an avalanche chute -- an area with missing trees, messed up snow, etc.


4

If it ain't broke don't fix it. These's only one real guideline for sharpening anything, and that is to sharpen things when they get dull. If your edges aren't dull, or dinged, or rusty, then they likely don't need to be serviced. Inspect your bases and edges for any nicks or gouges regularly, if you take your board or skis to the shop to get waxed ...


4

I think the answer is, it depends... :) Snowboard back protectors come in several guises, some better than others: Snowboard packs (with protectors) are similar. I would suggest that a protector (stand alone, not built into a pack) is going to offer much better protection than any back pack can offer. Main difference The main difference appears to ...


3

The different types of snowboards are: All-mountain: Versatile snowboards that can be used on all parts of the mountain, including machine-groomed runs, backcountry, and park and pipe. Freestyle: Boards that are light, short, and flexible, and ideal for terrain parks and doing tricks (riding rails, jibbing, etc) Freeride: Boards that are ideal for ...


3

I am unfortunate in that our weather is warm and wet with a lot of melt/freeze cycles, and have lots of experience dealing with skiing on sheets of ice. here I am using "Ice" loosely to mean anything from true ice to hard packed snow you need razor sharp edges to stay upright and in control. Ice and snowboards don't make for a great day out, so avoiding it ...


1

Whenever you store your snowboard and do not intend to use it the next day again (unless you really like your board), then do the following Clean it. Dry it. For longer storage, usually summer storage, do the same as above and Wax the base, but do not scrape off excess wax. It adds some protection while storing. Store in dry and cool place (with higher ...


1

I think he meant the thing what I always call "let the board do the work". It's hard to explain theoretical, but I'll give it a try :) Introduction So, as a beginner you really try to push your board in the direction you want to drive. You push your feed forwards/backwards to get your board where you want to. However, it's really more about to try to ...


1

I actually had a backyard board like that back in the early 90s, you can wear whatever boots you want with that board. Snowboard boots were developed for supportive snowboard bindings, those old boards didn't have supportive bindings, just toe straps like what you found on water skis and surf boards. You don't need to wax the bases, but you will glide ...


1

Steamboat has some very nice tree skiing. In general open tree skiing in Colorado involves finding an aspen or similar hardwood grove and those don't occur at the very highest elevations. So as a rough first guess, I'd look for resorts at similar elevations to Steamboat. I can't think of any similar evergreen groves like those at Heavenly, but it has been ...



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