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7

Scandinavia is a good option, the more north you go the better. For me the nature there is more remote, more 'raw' compared to the Alps. So I would think it's comparable with Canada (although I've never been to those regions). If you can choose when to go, why not go during winter time. You can add late autumn and early spring too. In this timespan you ...


6

There are three important aspects: Maneuverability, exposure to wind and firm attachment. The optimal orientation for all of those is vertical. Most of the board is then covered by the body so there is minimal added wind resistance compared with horizontal mounting, were most of the board sticks out on the side and act as a huge sail. With horizontal ...


5

I first learnt snowboarding twenty years ago, when boards and bindings were rigid, the boards were long and asymmetrical, and back then carving was the way to turn. You'd lean right over (sometimes 75-80 degrees over) and the board would carve itself round a turn. Modern boards are much more flexible, and what your instructor means by twisting is that you ...


4

I am unfortunate in that our weather is warm and wet with a lot of melt/freeze cycles, and have lots of experience dealing with skiing on sheets of ice. here I am using "Ice" loosely to mean anything from true ice to hard packed snow you need razor sharp edges to stay upright and in control. Ice and snowboards don't make for a great day out, so avoiding it ...


4

Like a lot it comes down to preference. Assuming from your current setting you do not ride fakie/switch a lot. (Then something like +12°/-12° would more appropriate, and the following paragraph would be less helpful.) Something that is preferable in deep powdery snow is to have a long nose and a short tail (which is something you can observe also in the ...


3

This is why most snowboarding and skiing gloves these days have a wiper built in. Rain-X and other coatings can help a little, but there appears to be no all purpose solution, so just get a pair of gloves with a wiper, and get used to using it frequently.


3

I find that horizontal is often not convenient. It will get caught in narrow paths, it will get in the way of your arms if you use poles to go up, and it can easily get unbalanced, pulling strongly on one side. On the other hand, most dedicated packs allow you to secure the board vertically, which works very well. You need to secure it very tight to ...


2

Whenever you store your snowboard and do not intend to use it the next day again (unless you really like your board), then do the following Clean it. Dry it. For longer storage, usually summer storage, do the same as above and Wax the base, but do not scrape off excess wax. It adds some protection while storing. Store in dry and cool place (with higher ...


1

I ride a lot and have never seen any gadgets for fixing this. It depends on the snow as well, since the bigger wetter stuff (so cal / washington mountains) tends to be much more of a problem than the bone dry stuff (co / slc mountains). Worse is that in conditions with lots of snow coming down you may want to wear goretex shell mitts, and regardless you'll ...


1

I think he meant the thing what I always call "let the board do the work". It's hard to explain theoretical, but I'll give it a try :) Introduction So, as a beginner you really try to push your board in the direction you want to drive. You push your feed forwards/backwards to get your board where you want to. However, it's really more about to try to ...


1

I actually had a backyard board like that back in the early 90s, you can wear whatever boots you want with that board. Snowboard boots were developed for supportive snowboard bindings, those old boards didn't have supportive bindings, just toe straps like what you found on water skis and surf boards. You don't need to wax the bases, but you will glide ...



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