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31

The following references from a few major rope manufacturers cover rope care thoroughly. Please see the bottom of this answer for a summary. From Bluewater Ropes: Avoid stepping on your rope. Beside the potential of cutting, stepping on a rope will grind dirt into the core and increase the possibility of internal abrasion. Protect your rope from ...


22

Some sleeping bags come with a larger sack which does not unnecessarily compress the sleeping bag. So you might get a linen bag of around 50l volume (depends on the size and type of the sleeping bag). Furthermore, it is best to store it in a dry place, especially if it's a sleeping bag with down stuffing.


20

The first solution that comes to mind is a "zeer", or pot-in-pot refrigerator. However, this functions best in hot and dry environments as it relies on evaporation to work. Such a device is constructed by nesting one clay pot inside another, with a layer of sand between them (about an inch on the bottom, a few inches on the sides). The sand is then soaked ...


18

When I bought my sleeping back from the scouts I was told not to store it in its stuff sack for long periods, and instead to hang it on a coat hanger so that it doesn't get compressed. I was also told to stuff it into the bag rather than roll it as that way the bits that get squashed when compressed are different each time.


17

I would highly recommend storing all gear with batteries removed. Batteries over time can (and often do) leak battery acid and cause corrosion. I've seen this happen quite a bit in head-lamps -- possibly because they do get some moisture in them if worn during aerobic activity? -- but also in hand-held Talkabout(TM) type radios, avalanche beacons, gps, ...


16

Yep! If you store your compass near objects that have strong magnets in them (such as your car speakers) it can demagnetize over extended periods of time. There are a few other issues your compass can run into that makes it less reliable as well. Air getting into the compass housing (in excess) Bubbles can form within the compass housing when doing big ...


15

Bear canisters should not be suspended. Doing so would make it possible for a bear to steal the canister and take it away. The shape of the canisters make it very challenging for a bear to hold or carry, and normally they will eventually give up and ditch the canister somewhere still close enough that you could find and retrieve it. If you have it hung, and ...


14

In addition to what Liam writes, since early childhood, I have found that a two-step approach gets out more air. It starts the same as Liams approach, but has some more steps. The approach below works for Thermarest. Open the vents Fold it as Liam says From the far end that does not have a vent, roll it slowly, continuously having one knee on top to push ...


14

According to this site there are only a few things that can go wrong with your compass: Mechanically, it can become hard to read because of a cracked dome or contaminated fluid; it can leak, causing a bubble in the fluid which, if allowed to grow, will interfere with damping of the dial; or it can become “sticky,” a condition that prevents the card from ...


12

Although technology has brought us many conveniences most of them require supporting power or other technology. You seem set on refrigeration and you say: "I am willing to go to just about any extent short of buying a fridge and a generator." Perhaps you should consider solar panels (photovoltaic) and an electric refrigerator. Both technologies are ...


11

Plainly speaking, it makes sense to keep your rope away from any chemicals at all - battery acid, grease, oil, bleach, etc. Same goes for any objects that might harm it, chemically (car batteries) or physically (anything sharp or jagged that may dig in.) Take care of it, keep it dry, well coiled and well away from anything that might harm it. Yes, it may be ...


11

When you put the bag into a compressing sack, the insulation fibers take some damage. (Synthetic fibers are less resistant in this regard than down.) The longer and harder you compress the insulation, the more damage; the insulation slowly loses loft and gets "colder". Therefore it's best to keep the sleeping bag hanging or lying freely, possibly in a bigger ...


11

Make sure to thoroughly clean and air it before storing, especially for long periods of time - this will get rid of any damp and thus should help prevent mould. Aside from that, make sure to keep it dry and away from large temperature fluctuations (a loft isn't ideal for this reason.)


11

The type of oil surely matters. Within petroleum products, thick, waxy Cosmoline has proven to be effective, but it's not nice to remove. (I've never personally used it for this reason.) I have recently learned of and started using Fluid Film. It has an unusual (to me) wool-lanolin base. I have limited experience with it and I have not yet conducted my ...


10

It can, yes - by keeping water and oxygen away it can greatly slow or prevent the oxidisation process from occurring. However, I wouldn't necessarily advise it as the best approach. Instead I'd advise making sure tools are clean and thoroughly dry, then storing them in a cool dry place (unless the manufacturer recommends otherwise of course.) There's two ...


9

I think this site might have the answer for you. Main points there are: Protect against Hull Damage & Distortion. Do not let the kayak to bend, distort, and getting damaged. Protect from Harsh Weather, Sun & Other Elements. The kayak is usually made out of materials which don't resist the sun infinitely, better to protect them from direct sunlight ...


9

Thermarest and other self inflating foams should be stored inflated, not deflated and rolled up. Generally anything that has a small form and a large form, and is expected to transform into the large form on its own should be stored in its large form. (So an air mattress you inflate can be stored in the small form, but your sleeping bag and pillow shouldn't ...


9

If you'd broaden "down" and "wet tents" categories to "all insulators" and "all wet items", it'll cover pretty everything, I think. Also a membrane jacket might stick to itself (coalesce) and may get damaged when you unstick it (membrane layer may peel of). One could think about rubber, which takes new shape under prolonged pressure, but it's not what you ...


8

For any reasonable depth (ie. something you'd be willing to dig without specialized machinery), a deeper hole makes for a more stable temperature. The extra mass of soil surrounding your cellar acts to average out temperature changes: shallow burial averages out day-night shifts, while deeper averages out seasonal changes as well. The end result is that a ...


8

As mentioned in comments, this option to coil a rope will get you some twists in it. So I do not recommend it for longer ropes (i.e. your climbing ropes), as twists are very inconvenient when belaying. This mode is mainly suited for cordelettes that you want to attach to your harness and therefore should be compact. To create such a coil follow these steps: ...


7

My gut reaction is this - it's a can full of human waste, it's going to smell whatever you do with it. However, I wonder whether you might be going down the wrong kind of route with things such as bleach etc. - such chemicals may do more harm than good if they kill the micro-organisms that break down the waste. It may sound silly, I would try something like ...


7

Ordinary vegetable oils of the type used for cooking will work but are not ideal. Over time they will gradually oxidise and may be colonised by bacteria, both of which can cause them to become acidic which can itself cause corrosion of the metal. Also vegetable oils can become gummy and sticky in quite a short period of time. Oils help to prevent ...


6

Best way would be to lay it horizontally so the filling won't shift and create spots that are more/less insulated. Second best would be to store hanging up in a closet. It does not compress the bag at all. If you don't have a closet tall enough to hold the bag, get a king-sized bed pillow case. put the bag in the pillow case and store in a clean, dry ...


6

Best place is to store it in a dry, thermally static environment. Make sure it is well-aired, dry and any muck is removed from it before storing it. Best to check the manufacturers guidelines if there are any.


6

You'll need to do several things: Change your habits and foods Work Combine several techniques First, you need to more carefully consider the necessity of refrigeration. Refrigerators are used to keep food in a "safe" temperature zone where bacteria is less active, and this requires temperatures close to freezing. Passive cooling, such as root cellars ...


6

There are two possible reasons not to store batteries in a headlamp that won't be used for a while: Residual current draw, and batteries leaking and destroying the headlamp. To make things waterproof, some headlamps don't have a regular mechanical switch to turn them on and off during normal operation. For example, mine draws a few µA when "off". ...


6

You should not hang a bear can; as whatsisname mentions it could be counterproductive and make it easier for a bear to make off with it. Not just that, but it will be a significant hassle for you to hang it. You should always prop some rocks around your can so it can't be rolled away as easily. Don't put it near a cliff, because you don't want it getting ...


6

Folding becomes an issue if you religiously fold in the same spot over and over -- say line up the corners all pretty and re-fold. Try this with any plastic, thin metal, etc... fold, unfold, fold, unfold, fold ad infinitum, and it will weaken and fail. If you fold a different way each time, then you run little risk of this becoming a problem, though be ...


6

Overall I think you should be okay with just making sure that the contact points on the oars are a bit padded, or at least, the contact point is not sharp. That way it shouldn't rub on the oar and degrade or scratch the finish. Rubber is a common way to keep oars in place without scratching the finish. You could consider using guitar hooks to keep them in ...


6

Typically...when putting an inflatable matt back into it's packaging I: Make sure all the vents are fully open Fold it (width wise) to the size of the bag you want to put it into Slowly roll the matt towards the vents, squeezing as much air as you can out. I'll normally roll it one roll then put my knees/weight onto it to squeeze the air out, continue. ...



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