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5

Upfront I would like to mention that I don't live in the UK, but I hope my answer is still relevant. The most commonly used stove brand in the US is Coleman, and I looked on amazon.co.uk, and it looks like they are common in the UK as well. For Coleman camping stoves you can buy adapter cables to connect them to large, refillable propane tanks. The common ...


5

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


4

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


3

As seen in the photos of the repair kits below, the wick is the fabric-like material which is made of fiberglass. It doesn't burn but does eventually degrade when exposed to the high heat of a stove. A simple replacement wick could potentially be fashioned out of nearly any fiberglass insulation such as that used in home construction. Furnace filters are ...


3

The priming wick on multi-fuel stoves is usually made of fiberglass material, and provides more surface area which makes harder to light fuels easier to ignite. Multi-fuel stoves (such as the one you mention, or the Whisperlight International) are able to burn a wide range of fuels -- some of which are not very volatile. For example, diesel fuel, and ...


2

Some petrol stations have a stock of LPG canisters outside, which I'm pretty sure are meant to be returned to be refilled - these are known as 'Calor gas' after the name of the dominant company in this market. They go from about 5kg upward, which I guess is quite large. I've never bought one, so am not sure how you'd go about it. Check which type of gas ...


2

Use a food Thermos to retain heat and simulate a pressure cooker. Save fuel. Opens up the burner for cooking other dishes. Thermos can be used to carry other items when not in use. Cheers


2

I have successfully used mixtures of gasoline, diesel and kerosine in various portions and had no problems that couldn't be solved by swapping to the other jet. Use the suck it and see approach works fine without getting technical. If availability is an issue and it comes to hot dinner or raw dinner are you really going to be that picky which fuel you use, ...


1

One expensive component is the cooking pot; depending on if you already have one, you might want to find a stove that is compatible with your existing pot. Trail Designs have several models that can burn both alcohol and wood. You can order their stoves for specific pot sizes. I have experience with their Sidewinder Ti-Tri which can also burn esbit. I would ...



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