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13

This information is available under the Specs on Jetboil's website. 100g canister: 100g fuel; gross weight 194g; empty weight 94g (51.5% fuel by weight) 230g canister: 230g fuel; gross weight 356g; empty weight 126g (64.6% fuel by weight) 450g canister: 450g fuel; gross weight 645g; empty weight 195g (69.8% fuel by weight)


12

Most gear you can test out in your house. Take your boots out on any trail, each time you go out pack a little bit more in your pack and get used to the weight. Come up with a good clothing layer system. Make sure you can get your tent set up quickly. There is nothing like setting up in a downpour minutes before sundown. You can practice this inside. Make ...


12

To test your hiking kit/boots to see if it is all comfortable/fits you can do a day walk but carrying your full rucksack and kit (or stuff of similar weight). This will give you a idea of how your kit fits and the difference in hiking with a full rucksack compared to a daysack to help you judge how far you should aim for. Most of your camping kit can be ...


9

If you don't have a scale, you can still figure out roughly how much fuel is in each canister with a simple bowl of water. Drop a full canister in bowl of water and mark the water line. Then, drop an empty one in the bowl of water and mark the water line. This gives you your full and empty lines for reference. Now you can drop each of your partially-full ...


8

When I cook home-dehydrated food, I often rehydrate for a day - but not on the stove. In the morning, I boil water for coffee, pour some over dehydrated meat in a Nalgene, leave the lid on loosely until the water is only warm, then tighten the lid firmly. It spends the day in the pack and by dinner time the meat is rehydrated. For some vegetables, such as ...


8

All the other answers are correct and good. Car-Camping If the problem is that you want a realistic test but either (a) do not have much time, or (b) wisely do not want to go out backpacking on a test trip alone, then do a car camping trip as a "dress rehearsal". Find a car-camping site.Preferably in the wild or woods, rather than a developed KOA-stlye ...


8

Looking at the photo, if the ground is as soft as that, burying the canister by 2-3 cm could help a lot. If you're camping at a beach and bury it halfway in the sand, then that should even work in high winds. Apart from that, if you're willing to buy a new stove, there are a number of them that come with built-in legs, such as this one


7

I would imagine the "testing" others referred to is suitability for purpose rather than will the gear end up damaged or broken. For example, if using a new tent, have you practiced pitching it at home first rather than waiting until you have to use it while in the middle of nowhere? Or is the stove and cooking equipment you plan to carry able to cope with ...


6

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


6

If it seems unstable as in wobbly then you might get better results by clearing out the ground you place it on so you have a level surface to work with (or by building a level surface with rocks or what you can find) Another option is to get legs that attach to the underside of the bottle to make the setup more stable. Here is an example from ebay, but ...


4

In my experience, the biggest culprits for leaking fuel are bad o-rings, but replacement o-rings of the wrong size and loose caps have also played a part. Over-tightened caps can also be a problem especially if the o-rings are a bit off size. Another consideration is the amount of fuel spilled on the stove or canister during fueling and use. Especially if ...


4

When packing/carrying the stove there are two main aims: to not break it and not get the rest of your kit covered in fuel. There are some tips for achieving this: pack the stove somewhere secure where it won't get too knocked about/crushed/bent. Most stoves will pack inside a pot/pan which is my preferred way of doing this. Similarly for the fuel bottle ...


4

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...


3

There can't be any general rule on testing equipment but you should have tested at least all the features that you think you will need during your journey. You also do not necessarily have to test all your stuff at once. For "technical" equipment such as tents, stoves and the like, it might be enough to just learn their handling. Nothing is more annoying ...


3

I have successfully used mixtures of gasoline, diesel and kerosine in various portions and had no problems that couldn't be solved by swapping to the other jet. Use the suck it and see approach works fine without getting technical. If availability is an issue and it comes to hot dinner or raw dinner are you really going to be that picky which fuel you use, ...


3

Most things I can think of would stop it working even when full. My one suggestion is, is the pump below the fuel line when on its side? The fuel line is the white tube in the picture. If it is in the middle of the bottle and the fuel is low it might not be submerged when the bottle is horizontal. Have you tried putting the bottle vertically or rotating ...


2

You should define whether you are asking about white gas stoves or isobutain (canister) stoves. For most backpackers, your main decision will be between the 2 broad stove categories: canister fuel vs. liquid fuel. You may also want to consider one of the growing number of alternative-fuel options now available.. A good resource to get started if you ...


2

You can test everything at home, in your yard, and at the gym. At home, test your water filter, setting up the tent in the backyard, assembling and lighting your stove and boiling some water (don't forget your windscreen), any fishing gear you might have, and setting up a fire in your backyard. At the gym, take your loaded backpack with you and do some ...


2

Rather than the type of fuel - any stove designed to run a fuel will run it with little maintenance, but the quality is important. I had to strip and clean my cooker, that had never had a problem, daily - at 6000+meters due a batch of bad fuel. Best option for trouble free cookers is Gas (Butane/Propane) - the cannisters are sealed in the factory the fuel ...


2

One other issue is altitude changes. Even with 'new' gas bottles going from 0 to 10000 feet (or back down) may cause problems. One way I've dealt with this is to put the gas bottle in a zip lock bag (the larger bag sizes sometimes have two "zippers"). Eric


2

Presuming you're planning on eating at/near your vehicle you're not really limited by the weight or bulk of the food. So, anything you can easily cook in 1 or 2 pots is a good bet. Generally, I have some version of pasta/rice/couscous and sauce. You can make your own sauce if you can get fresh ingredients or get reasonably cheap jars or dried packets. I ...


2

This slightly depends on size and heat output or your stove, but camping stoves are universally good at one thing, heating water. So this makes them ideal for using with dyhydrated food's. These have come a long way from super and pot noodles and you can now get some pretty decent tasty food that you simply have to add water too, there are a couple of good ...


2

If it has a wick in the priming pan it is most likely an international. The other main difference is the fuel tube on the international is slightly larger diameter. Although, this would be hard to tell without a comparison. However, as I commented to ShemSeger's answer there is a different diameter nozzle for kerosene. Therefore if you don't have this ...


1

I happen to have both stoves that you're talking about. They look pretty much identical, but you're right that the wick is in the international stove, the whitegas-only stove does not have the wick. The international stove also has a brass sleeve over the coil of pipe that directs the liquid fuel through the element where it's vapourised, the whitegas-only ...


1

My personal preference is for gasoline (yes, even ethanol added). I've never had to clean any of my stoves since I started using it. Given that the quality is pretty closely monitored and regulated in the US this is an extremely consistent, clean burning, and cheap option. It's also extremely easy to find... It should be noted that the "white gas" available ...


1

You can get a hose or pipe which allows you to connect the burner to the hose then the hose to the canister. This allows you to put the burner closer to the ground, in a small divot, behind a stump or otherwise shielded from the wind.


1

Try a different brand of canister. The MSR, and others, come in a shorter height, but burying it is the best solution. Plus, gives some wind break.


1

Another two cents (experience: two Philmont expeditions). Do all you can at home to test things. Boots: if you've got a pack, test the boots and break them in with local hikes. This also lets you work out the 'fit' of the pack -- find that sweet spot where the hip belt takes the weight and the shoulders stabilize. Gradually add weight to the pack up to ...


1

Try at forestry supply stores. The guys that sell pulaskis, fire pumps, etc. They have the entire setup for portable kitchens. The ones I've seen were a separate stove and bottle, but the stove and pedestal were sized that the stove would stack on the bottle. We used such a rig on a large canoe expedition, and used a pot that would fit the bottle and ...



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