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1

Another two cents (experience: two Philmont expeditions). Do all you can at home to test things. Boots: if you've got a pack, test the boots and break them in with local hikes. This also lets you work out the 'fit' of the pack -- find that sweet spot where the hip belt takes the weight and the shoulders stabilize. Gradually add weight to the pack up to ...


8

All the other answers are correct and good. Car-Camping If the problem is that you want a realistic test but either (a) do not have much time, or (b) wisely do not want to go out backpacking on a test trip alone, then do a car camping trip as a "dress rehearsal". Find a car-camping site.Preferably in the wild or woods, rather than a developed KOA-stlye ...


12

Most gear you can test out in your house. Take your boots out on any trail, each time you go out pack a little bit more in your pack and get used to the weight. Come up with a good clothing layer system. Make sure you can get your tent set up quickly. There is nothing like setting up in a downpour minutes before sundown. You can practice this inside. Make ...


3

There can't be any general rule on testing equipment but you should have tested at least all the features that you think you will need during your journey. You also do not necessarily have to test all your stuff at once. For "technical" equipment such as tents, stoves and the like, it might be enough to just learn their handling. Nothing is more annoying ...


12

To test your hiking kit/boots to see if it is all comfortable/fits you can do a day walk but carrying your full rucksack and kit (or stuff of similar weight). This will give you a idea of how your kit fits and the difference in hiking with a full rucksack compared to a daysack to help you judge how far you should aim for. Most of your camping kit can be ...


7

I would imagine the "testing" others referred to is suitability for purpose rather than will the gear end up damaged or broken. For example, if using a new tent, have you practiced pitching it at home first rather than waiting until you have to use it while in the middle of nowhere? Or is the stove and cooking equipment you plan to carry able to cope with ...


3

I have successfully used mixtures of gasoline, diesel and kerosine in various portions and had no problems that couldn't be solved by swapping to the other jet. Use the suck it and see approach works fine without getting technical. If availability is an issue and it comes to hot dinner or raw dinner are you really going to be that picky which fuel you use, ...


6

In my experience Coleman Fuel burns the cleanest out of everything that I've tried, it is unfortunately the most expensive and hard to find (relative to gasoline or diesel). Unleaded - Cheap and widely available, burns well but a little sooty. Diesel - Slightly less cheap (in UK/Europe) works very well. Use with wider jet. More sooty than unleaded. I also ...


4

Kerosene, white gas (Coleman fuel) and unleaded should all work. However you need to change the nozzle/jet where the fuel comes out depending on the fuel used. I believe (though I'm not entirely sure) there are different diameter holes for different fuels - presumably due to different viscosity. This MSR FAQ has some useful information, particularly the ...



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