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11

Snow blindness is at best very painful. UV damage to your eyes is not something you want to play around with. If only 40% protection they are are not sunglasses, they are fashion accessories and offer no where near enough to protect your eyes for more than an hour. For $10 you will get glasses that provide 99% protection, why risk it?


8

For years I used to wear Oakley Razor Blades when surfing (yes, I am that old...) but once I started to manage slightly bigger waves, even wearing a strap to hold them on wasn't enough. In reality, unless you are on small surf, you will have them ripped off when you wipe out, so your best bet is to learn to surf without them. You will very quickly avoid ...


7

Those types of glasses do not provide adequate protection from sunlight, especially in areas with lots of reflective surfaces (desert, snow) and at high elevations where there's more UV radiation due to the thinner atmosphere above you. What you want are either wrap-around glasses which don't let light in the sides, or particular glasses called "glacier ...


6

These are generally known as glacier glasses. They are rated as Category 4 on the CE scale and you aren't supposed to drive while wearing them. Sunglasses in Category 4 only transmit 4-8% of available visible light. Hidalogos sunglass guide has a very complete list of the different factors in choosing sunglasses. Category 4 come in a wider range of ...


5

One of the classic applications of polarized sunglasses is to skiing. Light from the sun is unpolarized, but when it is reflected from a surface at a glancing angle, it becomes highly polarized. When you're on a snow field, a lot of the bright light getting into your eyes is light reflected from the snow, and when the sun is low in the sky, this glare is ...


4

There are several options Goggles that fit over you prescription glasses (Commonly referred to as "Over the glasses" or just 'OTG'.) - probably the cheapest solution, used successfully by many people. Contact lenses are available for all sorts of prescriptions now days and could be worth considering. Prescription Sun Glasses - good wrap around sports ...


3

The basic idea of polarizing glasses is not to block all light, it's to block light that undergoes a glancing reflection, such as sunlight coming to your eye off of water or snow from near the horizon. The initially unpolarized light becomes highly polarized by this type of reflection, so by eliminating it, you make it easier to see and be comfortable ...


2

There are actual standards for this. If you are going somewhere where snow blindness is a real possibility, you should have sunglasses that meet the standard. The most common standard used in outdoor sunglasses is the Category standard based on the european CE standards. There are 5 categories 0-4 This page has a good overview. ...


1

You might want to try a baseball cap that you're not really that fond of. I've safety pinned mine onto my wetsuit leash and it was okay-ish. A lot depends on where you are, and the differences between the tropics and higher latitudes can be really extreme. It also depends on how long you're going to be out for. Again, big differences between an hour surf ...


1

The answers all correct, but the main questions is, Does unique Polarized glasses protect from UV rays? Yes...up to some extent (some percentage).That is, when polarized glasses block the horizontally polarized light from SUN, It also blocks the UV rays which are horizontally polarized. So one can protect from UV rays by using Polarized glasses up to some ...



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