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17

Get them lost. Basically you want to get them out to where they lose their bearings, and then as a group, get them to find their way home. Good acting helps. If you can pretend you are also lost then they get the mental experience. This is a great way to teach people how to deal with really being lost. There are a couple of key points here, and the ...


13

I would recommend covering some of the following topics: First Aid - focus on how to stabilize an injured person and how to transport them. Teach them how to splint a sprained ankle and treat heat stroke, hypothermia, dehydration, shock, how to stop bleeding, and other basic first aid skills. A good teamwork skill to practice is transporting an injured ...


7

I'm a lurker on two knife-related forums (Bladeforums.com and Knifeforums.com). On both of them, "what knife should I buy" or "what is the best knife for X" are either closed quickly or become very hot topics because there is no right answer, only lots and lots and lots of opinions. See this thread for a recent discussion of the topic (including some nice ...


7

I don't know which part of the world you are in, but if it is the United States, and if these are Boy Scouts, then be certain you consult the "Guide to Safe Scouting". You may also want to consult the "Wilderness Survival" merit badge book for some ideas.


6

"Your [plane/ship] has [crashed in the jungle/sunk near an island]. Here's what you were able to salvage from the wreck. Oh, and $HeaviestKId has broken his leg" In our case we had food but no cooking equipment, i.e. we had to cook bread wrapped round a twig and improvise a frying pan from metal sheet, make a stretcher...


5

Wildcamping is always a lot more interesting than staying on a "safe" campsite with showers, toilets, taps etc. Since you are staying at one of these campsites you could try finding an area that is far away from the facilities to make it seem more remote. If there is a clean enough stream/river/burn nearby you could encourage the scouts to collect water ...


4

When I went survival camping my troop always pretended that it was a day hike that turned into an overnight survival situation. We only brought what we would normally bring on a one day hike. Obviously we packed huge lunches and brought extra clothes acting all like "My mom sure packed me a big lunch! Maybe I should save most of it for later." Once we got ...


3

a good stalking exercise is fun! Draw straws to see who the first "target" is and have them sit in a clearing blindfolded while the other players hide in the woods around the target (specify a starting distance). Once all are hidden the target may remove the blindfold and stand up, turn, but not move. The stalkers then begin to close in on the target. ...


3

In our last camp we had the scouts build a bridge over the river; also, bivouac during a 2-3 day long hike; or you might try what we call the "three eagle feathers" challenge: each feather stands for a test - 24 hours alone in the forest (with extra task to sneak close to the camp and spy without being seen), 24 hours with no speaking, 24 hours with no food. ...


3

Make a sunhat or rainhat out of grass. Make a stretcher out of wood and bootlaces and carry the heaviest Scout (heh heh) for twenty metres (over some mildly challenging terrain, like a small creek). Boil water in a plastic bottle. Find bugs and worms and cook them and eat them. Make up songs about the scout leaders and sing then at full volume around ...


3

Obviously, this is a scenario that could be avoided with proper planning and better practices. The best solutions would have been preemptive. Regardless, this scenario is where my question is to be asked from. (...) Assuming a normal load out (normal clothing, some water, a knife, etc.), what do you do to survive and make it back to a safe place? ...


3

I carry two knives when i'm backpacking: a small Swiss army knife (the "Classic" model) and a large hunting knife (I can't remember the brand, it is a good quality one, cost about $150). The Swiss army knife is lightweight and indispensable for its use as a can opener, for gutting fish, and general purpose tools. The authentic Swiss army knives are also ...


2

This depends a lot on what you plan to do, and I don't think there's any such thing as an all-purpose knife. I mostly use mine when hiking and backpacking, when it would be silly to bring a big, heavy knife that I don't need. For what I do, what works great is a tiny swiss army knife, which I mainly use for slicing food (knife blade), cutting moleskin ...


2

I've always found fake "moulage" injuries to be a popular activity. You apply the wounds then ask them to perform proper first aid based on the injury they see. One of the times I had my brother apply a broken bone moulage to me, then I just waited on the trail for our troop to hike by--they had no idea that I was going to be there. They had to treat the ...


2

go out and collect sample leaves and see if they can identify them (don't pick anything poisonous... show them the plant without disturbing it if/when you find it!) bonus points if they can identify which ones are edible or which have medicinal properties!


2

teach them how to make charcloth... use it to make a fire using as many different starting methods as possible (lense, flint/steal, bow/drill, etc)


1

Orient yourself to the situation. Admit that you're injured and lost, but stay calm. Don't fool yourself into feeling invincible, but recognize that you are in fact strong enough to survive. If your current location and situation is a source of danger, immediately move to a safe location. It's better to be alive and lost than dead and not lost. Stabilize ...



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