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26

Here is an article that quantifies the heat loss effects of cotton, polyester and polypropylene: Rossi et al., Dry and Wet Heat Transfer Through Clothing Dependent on the Clothing Properties Under Cold Conditions, International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics (JOSE) 2008, Vol. 14, No. 1, 69–76. Experimental Summary Here is a rough summary ...


17

Yes, there have been studies on how much various fabrics insulate when wet and dry. I remember Dr Murray Hamlet mentioning these statistics in one of his lectures on outdoor survival in the cold. It's been a long time, but I think cotton looses something like 80% of its insulating properties when wet. I may be off on the exact number, but I definitely ...


12

Masons Line Paracord's biggest selling point is that it's strong enough to hold your body weight. That's great and all, but honestly, it's very rare to get caught in a situation where you're forced to use a rappel. The most common situation is when parachuters get caught in trees, but in those situations, you already have a bunch of lengths of paracord ...


12

There have been quite a few studies on this. There are various factors that will affect this, these include: Position in the snow: people upside-down sometimes live longer because the brain has more blood flow Equipment you may be carrying (aqualung, etc.) Injuries or bleeding: if you bang your head you could be dead before the avalanche even stops, etc. ...


10

Only 1 out of 10 survive Avalanches If you are completely buried in an avalanche the odds of survival are slim, unless you wear a transceiver (beacon), and you have partners that escaped the avalanche who have the right gear (beacon receivers, probes, and shovels) as well as the experience from practicing with them to save you. Statistics show that the ...


6

There is this informal study that suggests there isn't much difference between wet gear of any fabric. http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2012/11/cotton-vs-wool-insulation.html But it misses the point entirely. It's not getting wet that kills, it's how long it takes you to get dry afterwards that kills. A much better test would be to keep the water at a ...


4

I'm pretty sure this concept originated with search and rescue teams, who noticed a correlation between what the lost hiker was wearing, and whether the result of the search was a 'rescue' or a 'recovery'. I strongly believe this to be true, and I tried to find good data online, but no luck yet. If somebody can find a proper, double-blinded study of the ...


4

As always the answer differs depending on application, the experimental summary above tells us what happens very well while offering a conclusion that is only subjectively useful. In my own experience cotton is comfortable, inexpensive and can be obtained in the right size, but should not be used exclusively when traveling outdoors any significant distance ...


2

Nylon is great for climbing ropes, but it's sub-optimal for lashing and repair since it stretches so much under load. If you are going to carry string, carry polyester braided cord. It's just as strong but stretches much less. This is all I could find on the web quickly: Cabela's Northern Flight™ Braided Decoy Cord It's 2mm cord with a 450lb breaking ...


2

I know some people (mostly female) who wear cotton on winter hikes, but they claim they don't sweat (and they drink very little, which makes that plausible). But I sweat a lot, and if you sweat a lot, in winter it's very important to wear breathing clothes. And with breathing clothes is so, that one non-breathing layer breaks the whole thing. Cotton likes ...


1

Ignoring having an airbag or airlung (which aren't common in the UK at least) Here is a list of things to do if your are caught in an avalanche. They should increase your chance of survival, obviously the best way to increase your chance of survival is to not get caught in an avalanche at all. Get clear 90% of avalanches are triggered by the people caught ...



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