Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

28

The correct answer is to put your avalung mouthpiece in your mouth and inflate your airbag. If you don't have either of those things, then you are NOT properly equipped to be in avalanche terrain. If you get caught in an avalanche when you are not properly equipped, then the best you can do is 'swim' like crazy to try and keep yourself afloat, and then ...


28

Here is an article that quantifies the heat loss effects of cotton, polyester and polypropylene: Rossi et al., Dry and Wet Heat Transfer Through Clothing Dependent on the Clothing Properties Under Cold Conditions, International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics (JOSE) 2008, Vol. 14, No. 1, 69–76. Experimental Summary Here is a rough summary ...


20

TL;DR - First try to identify if the wire is supposed to carry electricity (insulators on posts/wire goes to an electrical box/posted warning signs/ect...). There's really not much you can do to check the wire for current without a device aside from listening to it, touching it (potentially dangerous), or throwing something onto it that might react to a ...


19

Obviously, you're better off not going near the water in the first place. If there are storm clouds anywhere within your vicinity, do not spend unnecessary time in the water and consider the possibility of flash floods. If you do find yourself in the water, form a circle. You place your hands around the shoulders of the two people closest to you, and they ...


19

Yes, there have been studies on how much various fabrics insulate when wet and dry. I remember Dr Murray Hamlet mentioning these statistics in one of his lectures on outdoor survival in the cold. It's been a long time, but I think cotton looses something like 80% of its insulating properties when wet. I may be off on the exact number, but I definitely ...


18

You need to know if you are in Northern Hemisphere or in Southern Hemisphere or nearby the Equator. If you are in Northern Hemisphere: First locate the Polaris. Its the last star in The Ursa Minor. I've had trouble in locating it sometimes. Many people do. So, if you are in such a situation, try locating The Ursa Major. The Ursa Major is located just to ...


18

I've been up close with grizzly and black bears before, I've had them come sniffing through my camp and I've done nothing but lay quiet in my sleeping bag and wait for them to wander off, which they usually do. Most of the time I don't even know they were there, I just find their tracks the next morning. Believe it or not bears spook really easily. I've ...


14

When a rattlesnake gets his rattle on, what exactly is the desired reaction it's expecting from you, and what other indicators does it give you that a strike is imminent? It's a warning that it's there, it's not necessarily a warning that it's about to strike (though of course, it could.) Likewise they won't always rattle before they strike. However, ...


13

Growing up in rural New Zealand, we often encountered electric fences. Some of them were illegally high-powered to deal with big animals. We tested fences either with the back of our hands or with a piece of grass. As specified a few times in this question (thanks @Michael Martinez), using the back of the hand is for safety. An electric shock can cause ...


13

The best plan is to plan to make sure that you don't get in a situation where you may need to cross a flooded stream. But, that said, as you talked of a flood situation, that can happen over a night with heavy pouring and so on so forth. Where, its really worth a second thought, that should you be crossing the stream at all, sometimes, with some careful ...


12

The simplest way (assuming you are in the Northern hemisphere) is to first find the Great Bear / Ursa Major / the Big Dipper / The Plough, and use the two end stars as a sight line. The star in Ursa Minor that they point to is Polaris, which is currently our Pole Star. This does change, but not noticeably in our lifetimes. (from ...


12

There have been quite a few studies on this. There are various factors that will affect this, these include: Position in the snow: people upside-down sometimes live longer because the brain has more blood flow Equipment you may be carrying (aqualung, etc.) Injuries or bleeding: if you bang your head you could be dead before the avalanche even stops, etc. ...


12

Masons Line Paracord's biggest selling point is that it's strong enough to hold your body weight. That's great and all, but honestly, it's very rare to get caught in a situation where you're forced to use a rappel. The most common situation is when parachuters get caught in trees, but in those situations, you already have a bunch of lengths of paracord ...


12

I've helped a few friends make torches for medieval events they were hosting. As I was the only one who managed to burn themselves during assembly and testing, I feel somewhat informed, if a bit clumsy. Your choice of materials will depend on how long you want your torch to burn for, as well as how brightly. Specifically, your wick material and your fuel. ...


11

Stick hardwood 2 to 3ft long Wick (I guess that's suitable terminology) cotton rags Fuel lamp oil or in the context of a survival situation, animal fat.† Misc nails or fence staples Directions Soak the rags in the fuel Wrap the rags around the stick Fasten the rags to the stick with the nails, staples, or something similar. Apply fire ...


10

I understand your question such that you are asking about fences for livestock and alike, not high-security fences. It is your responsibility to check if you could get in danger. If the fence looks like it was made to withstand humans and/or aggressive animals, I suggest not to touch it with anything. Apart from that (I have actually never seen a fence like ...


10

Adding this mainly because it's a different kind of approach. The other ones are usually more practical, but this is an alternative that does not require remembering any constellations. If you have a rough idea and a camera, you can take a long exposure (30s minimum, more is better) and check which star in photo is the only one that does not move / stays a ...


10

Only 1 out of 10 survive Avalanches If you are completely buried in an avalanche the odds of survival are slim, unless you wear a transceiver (beacon), and you have partners that escaped the avalanche who have the right gear (beacon receivers, probes, and shovels) as well as the experience from practicing with them to save you. Statistics show that the ...


9

Well, urine has a strong smell, and rabbits are very sensitive to smells. Too sensitive, in fact - human urine will repel, not attract rabbits and is sometimes even suggested as a means to keep them out of gardens. Rabbit urine, on the other hand, could definitely work, there's a good chance that rabbits in the vicinity would come to inspect what strange ...


8

The usual advice to someone in an emergency situation in the wilderness is to stay put, so that it's easier for rescuers to find you. In this situation, performance isn't an issue. There is a folk belief that "thirst is too late," and that people are commonly dehydrated without knowing it. If you believed that, then you might drink some of your water even ...


8

a fence for horses or cows, Take a grass straw, wet it a little bit, hold it against the fence, if it ticks in your fingers it means the power is on. i always do that do double check before put my hands on the fence, if im fixing it and say someone else turned it off.


8

Rotten fish. That's all I need to say. Crabs go mad for rotten fish in a net bag. If you can't get your hands on rotten fish, raw chicken is probably the next best thing and is certainly easier to buy. Place it in a bag or secure it to a line and have a net ready. With the both of these remember to thoroughly wash your hands before eating anything after ...


8

It's a novel idea, but it's not going to work in any practical sense. Most of those foams take about 15 minutes to setup, and you'll have to come up with some way to fabricate a mold while you spray it. It will be about an hour before you could safely enter your foam sarcophagus, and if this is to be used in an emergency situation, that's probably not time ...


7

I have a very simple reasoning about it. It's only based on personal experience, so don't regard it as absolute truth. Your body needs a certain amount of water to be comfortable, say, N. Comfort here includes urination (removal of poisons from body) and sweating (removal of heat). If you drink N or more, the body will function well. If you drink less than ...


7

Though I have never been hunting, neither have got into a situation where I had to bank on wildlife for survival, I had once imagined and practiced a very basic snaring technique, without involving an animal in real. But, this technique that I am going to explain is NOT necessarily the best one to implement under extreme circumstances. Things you need: ...


7

I have never heard of someone legally setting up a fence with a strong potential good enough to be fatal. That said, it is very much a possibility that the fence might severely injure (or worst case kill) a dog or some small animal (Pets when hiking?). In such a case, one indeed needs to be worried about an electric fence. First things first. If responsible ...


7

There is this informal study that suggests there isn't much difference between wet gear of any fabric. http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2012/11/cotton-vs-wool-insulation.html But it misses the point entirely. It's not getting wet that kills, it's how long it takes you to get dry afterwards that kills. A much better test would be to keep the water at a ...


7

Most importantly: be prepared. Always bring sufficient warm and waterproof clothing to make the worst possible weather for the area and time of year survivable. An emergency bivouac sack, a warm hat and gloves weigh very little, and can save your life. Also, something to start a fire (a lighter is not ideal as it could fail in very cold conditions), which ...


7

People getting killed by black bears is exceedingly rare. There are roughly 1 per year in North America, and most of those in Canada and Alaska. If you are in your tent at night and hear what you think is a black bear outside, the best thing to do is nothing. I have been in this situation a few times, and in all cases the animal (never saw it so can't ...


7

This is not a survival technique. The way to determine how many calories is in a particular food item is to measure the amount of heat energy emitted when an item is burned. Anything burned to ash is basically calorie free as far as food value goes. Ash is composed of whatever was unable to vaporize into smoke in a fire. The hotter the fire, the more ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible