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5

The most critical consideration is that it is absolutely bone dry which can be a challenge in temperate climates. Usually the best bet is to look for dead wood which is standing or at least off the ground. Ideally you are looking for something which is obviously long dead but still sound i.e. not rotten. Similarly it is often best to split a moderately ...


3

Basically this is a bit of a myth, I think perpetuated by old cowboy films! There's no way you could suck hard enough to remove the venom from out of your blood or lymphatic system. Most venoms are highly potent and only a very, very small amount is needed to cause damage. Most animals will produce a great deal more than is required to injure you so (for ...


4

This is simply a compendium of relevant answers already given. Hopefully someone will come up with an original more detailed answer. This is from an answer by WedaPashi in What are the first aid precautions to be taken in case of a snake bite?. Do not let anyone try to suck the venom out of the bite site. (I have heard cases of such a horrid thing ...


2

I realize this is an old post, but in case someone really wants to know... I'm a biochemist, and if there's 82 kilo calories (or "calories" as used by nutrition science and how I will use the unit term from now on - because in standard conversation no one uses kcals), per 100g of pine flour then there's slightly less (12%) than 82 calories per 100 g of pine ...


6

See The New York Times, Nov 5, 1991, After a Plane Crash, 30 Deadly Hours in the Arctic. The four-engine turbo-prop aircraft with a wingspan of nearly 150 feet -- a jack-of-all-trades plane widely used by the Canadian and United States military to haul cargo and troops -- was on its final approach to the Alert airstrip [400 miles from the North Pole] ...



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