Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I would say it's not a question of too cold, tents don't add that much warmth. Tarps and a shovel can make some very nice shelters in the snow. The real limitation is blowing snow/rain and the wind speed you expect to stand. If the wind is shifting at all, or is much above 20 mph, a tarp is going to be fairly miserable. ( I'm not including floorless tents ...


1

There are a few things to think about: Fabric. Selection of fabric will affect weight and durability. Whatever you get, make sure it's UV resistant, and you should probably consider something with rip-stop. For me, the ultrasil nylon is a bit light (I doubt it would handle much of a tree branch falling on it). At the same time, a durable canvas tarp ...


-2

The main advantage of a tarp is its adjustability, large covering area and light weight. So for myself, main concern is getting a lot of covered area with only little weight. Then, tarps are so simple in principle, you can do them yourself, starting with just a piece of polyethylene film. A really nice tarp design allows you to also use trees for pitching, ...


0

consider it the way you consider your clothing: Layering is the key. You can pitch a tarp higher off the ground or closer to the ground, givin more or less ventilation. You can ad an inner tent, be it a mere net tent, be it an inner tent sewn from nylon taffeta. You will be able to adjust your ground insulation with stacking two mats or combining a mat with ...


1

There are some really light weight Easton poles, check http://www.trekking-lite-store.com/Zelte/Zelt-Zubehoer/Easton-Front-Pole::133.html around 50grs (this is really light!). There is also a sturdyer version available at 120grs. I have successfully used my old leki hiking poles which weigh in at 280gr a piece, (see ...


0

The second one is the better form. I have used that form, with the tall end in a spruce in both heavy rain and in snow, and stayed perfectly dry. However I didn't use a tarp as small as 1.4 x 2.4 m The one I used, I think was sold as an 8 x 10 foot tarp, but in fact was about 7.5 x 9.5 feet -- call it 2.4 x 3 meters. The first one is good for heavy dew ...


4

OK, I finally tried the setup inspired by this site, which can be fully closed by pegging the sides closer to the middle, and pegging it directly on the ground on the opposite side of the entrance. It would be quite a tight night and you would need to leave your rucksack out, if it's big. But I was able to put the sleeping bag out of the bag from the ...


1

You could also have a look at the "Reflect Wedge" setup for the ALPKIT.COM Rig 3.5 Tarp in this PDF document on ALPKIT.COM. Although they show a bike and its wheel being used to support the tarp, you could of course so the same thing with trekking poles or similar. bearbonesbikepacking.blogspot.co.uk also has some examples of how you can setup the Rig 3.5 ...


8

Your most practical solution would seem to be a wing shelter. For the most part, you simply need your tarp, a tree, sticks and rope. The pdf I attached recommends making it 5 feet tall, but you could easily make it 2 or 3 feet tall to accommodate the length you need the shelter to be.



Top 50 recent answers are included