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19

There are all kinds of people who put up the fly first, then crouch under it putting up the inside. It's generally a very unpleasant experience from all I have heard, what with the crouching, crawling, and being rained on at least while getting the fly up. I handle it completely differently, because I have a free standing tent. On arrival at a site the very ...


17

For tents that erect outer first, pitching in the rain is no different to any other time, just don't leave the dry inner out in the rain while putting the outer up. The outer will get wet on both sides anyway. To make this easier a bit of forward planning is useful, like pack the inner and outer separately so that you can just leave the inner in the car ...


14

I suppose the two main factors are how comfortable the location is and how likely the location is to have problems should the weather play an influence. For comfort, the best location will be flat, free from bumps, and objects such as sharp rocks or sticks which can damage the groundsheet. Even with a decent sleeping pad or mattress, it isn't very nice when ...


12

Footprints: Zero? Sure. One? Good. Two? Nice. Three? Great. Four? Bomb-proof! My point is this: if you have a waterproof floor on your tent, you don't need any footprint. The trouble is, you are subjecting your tent floor to the abuses of rocks, sticks, sea-shells, brambles, or whatnot - meaning it will quickly get micro-tears and perforations. Enter ...


12

You do not need a tarp in addition to the rainfly of your tent (that's what the rainfly is for). While it's always nicer to pack up a dry tent instead of a wet one, as long as you air dry the tent when you get home you'll have no problems with damaging the rainfly. If you do not dry your tent at home, it will mildew and smell really, really bad. I ...


12

If the poles of your tent attach to the outer you're in luck. Before you go remove the inner from the outer and pack these separately, potentially wrap them in plastic bags or something so they stay dry. Then when you turn up your first task is to get the waterproof outer up as fast as possible. If it rains while you're putting this up, it's fine. Just ...


12

To test your hiking kit/boots to see if it is all comfortable/fits you can do a day walk but carrying your full rucksack and kit (or stuff of similar weight). This will give you a idea of how your kit fits and the difference in hiking with a full rucksack compared to a daysack to help you judge how far you should aim for. Most of your camping kit can be ...


12

Most gear you can test out in your house. Take your boots out on any trail, each time you go out pack a little bit more in your pack and get used to the weight. Come up with a good clothing layer system. Make sure you can get your tent set up quickly. There is nothing like setting up in a downpour minutes before sundown. You can practice this inside. Make ...


11

My other half used Tyvek when he was practicing Archery and one of the factors there was it had to be quiet, they used it for 4-6 hour stints to sit on. This is what he and some others in his club did: Wash it on a cotton / white cycle in your washing machine without any soap or detergent or powders. Wash it three times but let it dry thoroughly between ...


10

I wouldn't buy an ultralight tent if you're going to put the tent through severe trauma or require significant space (e.g. to use chairs inside). I do think the main difference in buying is cultural; unless you are poking it with sticks tents shouldn't experience that much damage. The modern ultralights should be good for most any weather outside of ...


9

The outside of a tent is designed to get wet, the key trick is to keep everything else dry. You will want to pitch the outer first and only then add the inner. The other answer has covered that well. Some more general tips though is to have a look at the base of your inner tent and see how waterproof it is. A lot of ground sheets are not waterproof at all. ...


8

Camping under a tree protects against rain wind morning dew heavy sun (worst on beaches) you can hide your bike from the rain ;) But you lose the sight of the stars. If rain is possible, it is a good idea to try to imagine how will the water be flowing downhill and not camp in its way. On the topic, if thunderstorm is possible, don't camp on top of a ...


8

Blacks / Millets do festival pop up tents (take it out the bag and it literally pops up) and pole system tents in your price range by Eurohike and Vango, who are both good well known brands. Bear in mind for that price range I don't see you getting anything that will have brilliant reviews. You'll be able to buy them brand new so shouldn't have to worry ...


8

All the other answers are correct and good. Car-Camping If the problem is that you want a realistic test but either (a) do not have much time, or (b) wisely do not want to go out backpacking on a test trip alone, then do a car camping trip as a "dress rehearsal". Find a car-camping site.Preferably in the wild or woods, rather than a developed KOA-stlye ...


8

Some back-of-the-envelope calculations: 12 volts * 4 amps = 48 watts * 8 hours = 384 watt-hours. That's the minimum battery capacity you'll need to power this for a night. The Goal Zero Sherpa 50 you propose to use will power it for about an hour, give or take efficiency losses. To power the blanket for the night, you're looking for something more along ...


7

Large tents are generally not an issue in campgrounds, although finding a large enough flat piece of ground may be. The more likely problem you'll face is maximum stay restrictions. Be sure that you check the requirements before making your decision, because having to move your camp every couple of weeks will dramatically change the setup you want. I ...


7

Assuming you don't have an outer first tent pitching in the rain comes down to planning and practice. It is actually possible to stay fairly dry if you're organised. There is no sure fire method but there are a few tricks which can help you keep the inner dry. Don't wrap the tent poles up inside the tent, this will force you to unwrap the tent while it's ...


7

I would imagine the "testing" others referred to is suitability for purpose rather than will the gear end up damaged or broken. For example, if using a new tent, have you practiced pitching it at home first rather than waiting until you have to use it while in the middle of nowhere? Or is the stove and cooking equipment you plan to carry able to cope with ...


7

Of course. You can (almost) always cool down a 4-season tent, but you can't very well protect a 2-season tent from a blizzard. The primary concern is weight, but if you're going to be camping near a glacier with -5°C winds, you'll want a sturdy tent, so that's going to come at a certain cost of weight. To keep a tent cooler, you can pitch it in the ...


6

To answer your other questions: No, don't insulate the pole at the bottom with a sandal, and yes, you are overthinking this. In the relatively unlikely (but possible) event that lightning does stike your tent pole, you want the current to be conducted to ground as easily as possible. If not, it might find other routes, like thru you. At best a sandal is ...


6

Folding becomes an issue if you religiously fold in the same spot over and over -- say line up the corners all pretty and re-fold. Try this with any plastic, thin metal, etc... fold, unfold, fold, unfold, fold ad infinitum, and it will weaken and fail. If you fold a different way each time, then you run little risk of this becoming a problem, though be ...


6

Is camping to you about the campsite or the outdoor activities? You've addressed the significant points, but I think the issue can be reduced to two factors: Time required to set up and take down Physical size Canvas will generally lose both due to the added bulk. So why use a canvas tent? As anyone familiar knows, they're amazing when you're inside ...


6

Generally, the more times the poles cross each other, the better the wind resistance. Additionally, tents with crossed-pole designs usually have better head room. Of course, more poles means more weight and more time required to pitch and strike the tent. How you pitch the tent is also important. Keep the doors away from the wind, put the bottom of the tent ...


6

In Germany, cheaper pop-up tents like this are quite popular for festivals. I would never buy one, though, for the following reasons: Every tent of those I have seen have been very prone to breaking. A friend of mine just discovered his (brand new one) was broken when he arrived on the campground. Because the poles are fixed inside you canĀ“t even improvise ...


6

Yes, if you are camping in rocks and snow, you will want a footprint. Since there don't appear to be any specifically made for this tent, I suggest making one out of Tyvek. It is readily available at most home supply stores here in the states (not sure on your location). Making the Tyvek match your tent dimensions perfectly is a touch of work. You'll ...


6

Well... a 4 season tent is a 4 season tent... You can use it during the whole year without any problems while a 2 season tent might not be as pleasant during the winter. I receive questions like this all the time. "What sort of boot should I get?", Packs, tents... My answer is kind of consistent for most of them... You buy gear for what you are going to use ...


5

I don't take a tarp to protect my tent, I take it to create another dry area outside - typically for cooking and eating. It can also create shade for cooking, eating, and just lounging around. (On a rainy day I'll lounge around in the tent if anywhere, but on a nice day there are lots of options.) Packing a wet tent won't damage it, but if your tent bag is ...


5

I've used a double liner (one inside the tent, one outside) before, and it was very effective. When I was in high school, I went on a multi-day backpacking trip where it rained every day. This was in the forecast, and bringing the double liner was the only thing that kept the water out. You could also double check that you're setting up your tent in a ...


5

I have camped in a tent with a similar rain fly - it was fine in gentle rain, and I found it amusing in a force 8 gale with lashing rain - because it leaked about 11 litres of rain into the tent overnight (so my middle daughter ended up a bit damp) My wife wasn't so keen, as she had never camped in storms before. I found it okay - if you don't like water in ...


5

Firstly, if possible, wait a while. Find somewhere to shelter out of the rain, and wait to see if the rain stops. For typical UK summer weather, most heavy rain is only short showers. So it will probably stop raining (or at least ease off) in 10 minutes or so. If its not going to stop raining, you can unpack your tent while under shelter. Then sort out ...



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