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14

Basically you should never find yourself in such a situation under normal circumstances. Tents are supposed to keep you warm, and not the other way round. If you are doing that more often then I'd say you have the wrong gear being used at the wrong place. Yet, there may rise a situation when you need to do it, there are ways to do it, but honestly you'll ...


11

There are differing schools of thought on this: Rolling/folding is a lot easier to manage in my opinion, easier to keep track of all the pieces, and when camping in dirty/snowy/wet environments makes it easier to keep the ground side of the tent together and the clean(ish) parts away from it. Stuffing results in fewer creases in the fabric over extended ...


10

One way I was taught in the uk armed forces (a very long time ago) was to use dry rocks. Heat the rock in your camp fire, then carefully just before bed time, place the rock inside your shelter, the rock releases it's heat slowly and acts very much like a radiator producing a consistent source of dry heat. A word of warning though this method was never ...


9

Some back-of-the-envelope calculations: 12 volts * 4 amps = 48 watts * 8 hours = 384 watt-hours. That's the minimum battery capacity you'll need to power this for a night. The Goal Zero Sherpa 50 you propose to use will power it for about an hour, give or take efficiency losses. To power the blanket for the night, you're looking for something more along ...


8

There is the same discussion with paragliders getting porose due to packing methods. And there has been a lot of literature to that topic (a paraglider costs 3.000 USD after all), with a simple conclusion: As nhinkle mentioned, the different methods result in different stress to the fabric. Usually your tent will get damaged due to constant stress on the ...


8

This isn't really a clear yes/no sort of question, I'm also pretty reticent to tell someone what would be best for their child. Aside from that hopefully someone will provide some information that will make your decision or others thinking of doing the same easier. My first suggestion would be to work out which huts you are thinking of staying at or around ...


7

From experience with small sections I have used hand sanitizer and it works. My parents used to use baking soda for our pop up camper. It was a thicker material then a tent, but it cleaned and absorbed a lot of sticky substances.


7

Of course. You can (almost) always cool down a 4-season tent, but you can't very well protect a 2-season tent from a blizzard. The primary concern is weight, but if you're going to be camping near a glacier with -5°C winds, you'll want a sturdy tent, so that's going to come at a certain cost of weight. To keep a tent cooler, you can pitch it in the ...


7

Firstly if you are on your own a four man tent is probably excessive. People buy small two man/trekking tents so that it is easy to carry them and one doesn't have this sort of problem. If you are in a larger group then it is not necessary for one person to carry the entire tent. You can break it up into at least poles, fly and inner. Different people can ...


7

I see 0 benefit to a tarp over a tent with regards to travel in bear country. this would allow the bear to see you (and leaving accordingly) Bears are going to smell you and your camp long before they see you. If your tarp/tent setup is any good at all, it'll be covering you from most directions anyhow. I can't imagine an open tarp having any ...


7

Before deciding on the tent to buy think about the characteristics of your different options. Tent size (how many people does it hold, is there room for luggage or even indoor cooking?) Tent weight (you want to keep that as low as possible obviously) Type of construction (generally this doesn't matter too much unless you have a favorite) In terms of ...


6

Hammock Can you lie flat in it? How large/heavy is it? Footbox? Color (stealth camping?) Suspension How easy is it to adjust? Can you adjust your hammock to different sags? Do you always want to have the same amount of sag? What is the furthest distance between trees that your suspension can accommodate? This will depend on How much stretch ...


6

Kisu! A common use for old tents or especially their fly-sheets is as a survival shelter(also called a kisu). They're great for trapping heat to keep people warm for when you have to stop for a while (be it because you've a problem or you just want to have lunch). If you haven't sat into one on a cold day you really have no idea how good well they work. If ...


6

First a good place is, where you can fit your tent with the guy lines fits in. In the finding process of this good place you should how the weather (forecast) is and then you can decide on the further points. good weather: sunny, clear stable distance to the fireplace, water and toilet go close to the fireplace to reduce walking, not to close to burn ...


6

Some considerations I can think of: Legality As long as it is not a nature reserve or a military restricted area, it should be allowed. You could probably check with some authority if it applies to the smaller islands as well. I would just try to contact Naturvårdsverket or Gothenburgs tourist agency. Safety Since its in the blatic sea, tides aren´t that ...


6

I recommend reflective lines for at night, and standard flagging tape for during the day. Both are lightweight and the triptease line really jumps out at night when hit with a light.


6

Well... a 4 season tent is a 4 season tent... You can use it during the whole year without any problems while a 2 season tent might not be as pleasant during the winter. I receive questions like this all the time. "What sort of boot should I get?", Packs, tents... My answer is kind of consistent for most of them... You buy gear for what you are going to use ...


6

Your likely out of luck. Aluminium is used in tent poles because it is stiff, strong and light. The trade off is that because it is less dense and more stiff it is less forgiving to being "manipulated". When steel fails it fails slowly, aluminium simply breaks. You could bend it back and see what happens, who knows it might hold. But bending it back is ...


6

Since you are not carrying the tent, I would buy a 2 person tent for the extra space. This will allow more room for clothes, sleeping stuff, changing your clothes etc. If it rains it would be easier to stay away from the wall of the tent. If you are carrying the tent, then you need to think about weight and a 1 person might be better.


5

We used Outdoor/Indoor Protective Flooring interlocking Mats inside the tent ($20) (above ground sheet) insulates, soft enough to sleep on. Toddlers like this from experience (good for naps too) thermal rest (roller mat) $30 -$200 each depending on climate Baby can sleep with lots of cotton blankets wrapped up This mother blogs about it ...


5

First of all a tent is made from two thin layers of fabric, expecting it to have sufficient thermal efficiency to retain heat, even with the door closed is perhaps a bit ambitious. Any heat built up in the daytime will be long gone before it even gets to the wee hours. A tent is a shelter that keeps off the rain and the wind, nothing more. Since any attempt ...


5

SilNet Seam Sealer is designed to seal the seams on nylon flysheets and can also be used glue to repair the same. See http://www.terra-nova.co.uk/tents-and-spares/all-tent-accessories/seam-sealer-glue/ for more information. Alternatively, you could get Vango to repair the flysheet for you: http://www.vango.co.uk/gb/content/28-aftersales


5

In most places I think the risk of theft while camping is generally low. People who choose to do camping for their holiday often don't give the impression of having lots of expensive gear. Even if some camping gear is quite expensive you either need specialist knowledge to know its value and/or its resale value is quite low. Added to the relatively low ...


5

First of all you might need to look into getting a new impregnation for your second hand tent. This can be done either yourself using sprays or wash-in-products (and in your case a probably huge washing maschine) or by giving the tent for re-impregnation to professionals, i.e. your local outdoor/tent supplier (this can be expensive though). In any case it ...


4

Howdy I'm a street person in South Texas (DEATHLY hot and humid, day and night) and I sleep in a tent almost every night of my life (if I can't find a safe unoccupied building that is). Here's probably THE most important tip: hang one, or two, moisture absorbing dehumidifiers in the tent. They are kinda rare to find in stores but no problemo online. Keep ...


4

One last tip, if you don't get everything just right, carry a pack towel or other microfibre super absorbent towel to get the inside as dry as possible before putting gear inside.


4

IMHO. You shouldn't buy new. Throughout my attempts to find that "one great tent" I've waisted so much money buying all the "best reviewed" ones, and ones I thought would serve my needs. To be honest, the best tent I ever slept in was an old cotton canvas covered with bee's wax to repel water. But that was so heavy you needed a stagecoach to haul it. The ...


4

I have bought the Copper Spur 3 and slept in it now on a cottage lawn and on a backcountry campsite. The advantages (lightweight, easy to set up) are real. There are some disadvantages that I have not seen mentioned in the other answers, so I've decided to add an answer providing them. None of these are enough to make me regret buying the tent or tell ...


4

It is most likely not sap but the excretion from Aphids (Greenfly). They suck the sap from the tree and then excrete this sticky substance, often called Honeydew. It may be worth contacting the tent manufacturers for advice, but I would suggest careful washing first with just water and if that isn't enough, try with some soap flakes (like Dreft).


4

To warm a tent, you need to produce more heat. There is a fun way to do this if you're sharing with another person. If this question is aimed at settling an argument with your girlfriend, I would definitely advocate this method. Other than generating more heat with your body, you could burn fossil fuels (risky, poisonous) or use an electric heating element ...



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