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11

You do not need a tarp in addition to the rainfly of your tent (that's what the rainfly is for). While it's always nicer to pack up a dry tent instead of a wet one, as long as you air dry the tent when you get home you'll have no problems with damaging the rainfly. If you do not dry your tent at home, it will mildew and smell really, really bad. I ...


6

Large tents are generally not an issue in campgrounds, although finding a large enough flat piece of ground may be. The more likely problem you'll face is maximum stay restrictions. Be sure that you check the requirements before making your decision, because having to move your camp every couple of weeks will dramatically change the setup you want. I ...


6

Folding becomes an issue if you religiously fold in the same spot over and over -- say line up the corners all pretty and re-fold. Try this with any plastic, thin metal, etc... fold, unfold, fold, unfold, fold ad infinitum, and it will weaken and fail. If you fold a different way each time, then you run little risk of this becoming a problem, though be ...


5

I don't take a tarp to protect my tent, I take it to create another dry area outside - typically for cooking and eating. It can also create shade for cooking, eating, and just lounging around. (On a rainy day I'll lounge around in the tent if anywhere, but on a nice day there are lots of options.) Packing a wet tent won't damage it, but if your tent bag is ...


5

Using Tilex or bleach to eradicate mold is the wrong thing to do. Bleach does nothing to eradicate mold, it simply bleaches the the fabric. If you want to kill mold, then you need to use a product designed specifically for that purpose. I would recommend Concrobium which will do nothing to remove the mold stain, but will kill the mold on contact.


4

When I decided to trash my tent, which was so old and was no longer of any use for active camping, I and my mentor in trekking, firstly used the same tent to teach kids of how to pitch a tent. And, I also used some part of the tent fabric to make a sort-of a sand bag for me, which I used to tie to my legs during my running sessions. And, I have also used a ...


4

There is one thing about tents in general (well, at least I don't know any exception) - they are absolutely not waterproof!. The outer part simply soaks with water and leads it down to the ground. But if you touch it - you have a rain inside. It's just like touching the surface of the umbrella from the below. So there is one thing you must take very ...


4

I have camped in a tent with a similar rain fly - it was fine in gentle rain, and I found it amusing in a force 8 gale with lashing rain - because it leaked about 11 litres of rain into the tent overnight (so my middle daughter ended up a bit damp) My wife wasn't so keen, as she had never camped in storms before. I found it okay - if you don't like water in ...


3

If there's a solid chance you're going to encounter snow or heavy wind during the trek ( and I'm guessing there is with those elevations ) or the future treks you plan to use the tent with, it's unlikely that a 3 season tent is going to be enough for you. 3 season is a category meant for tents that aren't intended to stand up to wind and snow. Though, if ...


3

I've used a double liner (one inside the tent, one outside) before, and it was very effective. When I was in high school, I went on a multi-day backpacking trip where it rained every day. This was in the forecast, and bringing the double liner was the only thing that kept the water out. You could also double check that you're setting up your tent in a ...


3

Footprints: Zero? Sure. One? Good. Two? Nice. Three? Great. Four? Bomb-proof! My point is this: if you have a waterproof floor on your tent, you don't need any footprint. The trouble is, you are subjecting your tent floor to the abuses of rocks, sticks, sea-shells, brambles, or whatnot - meaning it will quickly get micro-tears and perforations. Enter ...


3

Mold can be harmful to your health and damage the waterproof fabric of your tent. Mildew stains shouldn't necessarily be removed as it can damage fabrics. However, growth of mold should be stopped. It is best to consult your tent manufacturer documentation to know what's the best treatment for your specific product. According to MSR's How do I prevent ...


3

There is a thread about the topic on backpacker. It doesn't quite resolve the dilemma. Personally I stuff the fly on the outside of my backpack because it is faster. It may also have a chance to breath/dry. Because packing and unpacking is faster when stuffing, there is a chance that I will get it out to dry for a few minutes in the afternoon if it is wet. ...


2

There is at least one option from Ferrino, but I am sure there are more from "mountain" brands. Maybe you should stop looking for "4 season" and start looking for extreme/mountaineering/alpinism solutions, because high mountain expeditions usually imply low temperatures and high winds. But make sure you the tent is not an "emergency" tent. However you are ...


2

If you put down a ground tarp that is significantly larger than the tent (and by significant I mean more than an inch or so), tuck any extra under the tent, otherwise rain will hit the tarp and then go straight to the tent-floor, opening the door for tent-floods. I have never put a tarp inside a tent, but I have also never had an issue with tent-flooding ...


2

I would at least look into multiple smaller tents instead of a single large tent to handle all. Other than the cat thing (I really don't know how to respond to that), I'd probably have one tent for sleeping, and another for the "office". A third thing that isn't really a full tent but more just a canopy for cooking, eating, and other things that can be ...


2

If condensation formed on the inside of a tent it wouldn't simply flow down the sides of the tent into gutters. It'd drip, it'd drip all over you and everything in the tent making you wet. Every time you touched the sides or the wind blew, you'd get rained on. When you're wet your body loses a lot of heat. Your body would heat the liquid forcing it to ...


2

These are actually so incredibly easy to get, it doesn't really warrant an answer, but here goes anyway: Because these sort of poles are the de-facto standard these days, they are available everywhere. A google search on tent pole replacement gives me two pages of shops, Amazon, GoOutdoors (and some ebay sales) All you need is the length, diameter and how ...


2

Is camping to you about the campsite or the outdoor activities? You've addressed the significant points, but I think the issue can be reduced to two factors: Time required to set up and take down Physical size Canvas will generally lose both due to the added bulk. So why use a canvas tent? As anyone familiar knows, they're amazing when you're inside ...


1

Scottish mountaineer Hamish Brown used such a tent back in 1974 while completing the first round of Munros (Scottish mountains over 3,000 feet) in a continuous walk. Hamish’s tent, made by Tulloch Mountaincraft, was a single skin nylon tapered ridge that weighed “a bit over 3lb” (1.3kg), which is lighter than many solo tents today. This tent had a ...


1

It's hard to know what it is about that picture you consider partial. Is it the triangular opening through which you can see the door? Or, more significantly in my opinion, the fact that the fly doesn't come down to the ground? My tent is an Alpine Meadows. It looks like this: (picture from a classified ad.) I have been using it for over 30 years. We ...


1

Well by the looks of it, It'll hold up in a bid of rain, but no downpour or any hard wind. Plus side on this tent is that the rain fly will keep some direct sunlight of of the inner tent. And it looks like the front "door" of the tent is made of something that might be water proof. Now what you're gonna want to do (and you should do this periodically with ...


1

LBell has neatly summarized, that folding leads to smaller pack and stuffing is just faster. I'd like to add some considerations here (being an adept of stuffing). Sometimes you have to fold (and carefully!) because of a tight bag supplied with your tent or tarp. The bag will be too small to stuff your stuff inside. In this case I'd recommend to throw away ...


1

If the only Problem is that the replacementpoles don't fit your grommets. i'd suggest you have to replace the grommets too. It doesn't look like 6.5mm poles would break, you'll have to keep in mind that in those 30years the materials also got alot better than back then. Another possibility is visit a tubingstore and find something similiar, alltough you ...


1

Popup tents are also known as 'festival' tents, and are frequently regarded as single-use disposable items! Shroptshire Star: Volunteers clear up V Festival debris - in pictures Most Vango tents are at the cheaper end of the price scale - They aren't all bad (my first proper camping experiences in the UK were in a Vango tent), but the 'popup' end of ...



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