Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

Hammock Can you lie flat in it? How large/heavy is it? Footbox? Color (stealth camping?) Suspension How easy is it to adjust? Can you adjust your hammock to different sags? Do you always want to have the same amount of sag? What is the furthest distance between trees that your suspension can accommodate? This will depend on How much stretch ...


3

IMHO. You shouldn't buy new. Throughout my attempts to find that "one great tent" I've waisted so much money buying all the "best reviewed" ones, and ones I thought would serve my needs. To be honest, the best tent I ever slept in was an old cotton canvas covered with bee's wax to repel water. But that was so heavy you needed a stagecoach to haul it. The ...


2

I have bought the Copper Spur 3 and slept in it now on a cottage lawn and on a backcountry campsite. The advantages (lightweight, easy to set up) are real. There are some disadvantages that I have not seen mentioned in the other answers, so I've decided to add an answer providing them. None of these are enough to make me regret buying the tent or tell ...


0

You don't mention budget, but a couple things I really like when car camping are: Beautyrest air mattress (about $100). Can be very firm if you like that, and the edges don't collapse like most air mattresses do. It's like a real bed. Does require A/C close by. A tent tall enough to stand in. I'll rough it while backpacking, but I like to be comfortable ...


0

If it's honeydew, then soap & water should do the trick. Do not use harsh soap. An alternative method is to use a gritty, oily mixture to rub it out. I'm thinking maybe baking soda & vegetable oil. The grit helps break up the sticky substance, and the oil keeps it from re-sticking. Similar to using peanut butter to get gum out of your hair. Then ...


5

From experience with small sections I have used hand sanitizer and it works. My parents used to use baking soda for our pop up camper. It was a thicker material then a tent, but it cleaned and absorbed a lot of sticky substances.


3

We used Outdoor/Indoor Protective Flooring interlocking Mats inside the tent ($20) (above ground sheet) insulates, soft enough to sleep on. Toddlers like this from experience (good for naps too) thermal rest (roller mat) $30 -$200 each depending on climate Baby can sleep with lots of cotton blankets wrapped up This mother blogs about it ...


0

My friend has made a camping power box that uses (two?) car batteries to store the power. Instructions for making something similar can be found here and probably many other places. This more than supplies our needs including phones, lights, radio and electric 'fridge'. The major issue is getting enough solar power to recharge it particularly when it is not ...


8

Some back-of-the-envelope calculations: 12 volts * 4 amps = 48 watts * 8 hours = 384 watt-hours. That's the minimum battery capacity you'll need to power this for a night. The Goal Zero Sherpa 50 you propose to use will power it for about an hour, give or take efficiency losses. To power the blanket for the night, you're looking for something more along ...


5

Some considerations I can think of: Legality As long as it is not a nature reserve or a military restricted area, it should be allowed. You could probably check with some authority if it applies to the smaller islands as well. I would just try to contact Naturvårdsverket or Gothenburgs tourist agency. Safety Since its in the blatic sea, tides aren´t that ...


4

It is most likely not sap but the excretion from Aphids (Greenfly). They suck the sap from the tree and then excrete this sticky substance, often called Honeydew. It may be worth contacting the tent manufacturers for advice, but I would suggest careful washing first with just water and if that isn't enough, try with some soap flakes (like Dreft).


3

There are two options. You could buy a 2-season tent, that would be light(er than a 4 season for sure) or a tent fly. A tent fly would be ideal as it would be very light but I wouldn't use in some places where there are animals dangerous wandering around during the night. A 2-season tent you can zip it up and sleep without the problem of snakes, scorpions ...


2

Many 4-season tents cannot be ventilated as well as tents made for summer conditions. Also, they tend to be larger. this means, you can use them, but it won´t be ideal. This differs a lot with the actual models you are comparing, some might be well suited for all conditions. Note that the temperature difference between summer and winter trips normally has ...


1

If the tent fly can be pitched without the inner then your winter tent becomes a summer tent by leaving the inner at home.


6

Well... a 4 season tent is a 4 season tent... You can use it during the whole year without any problems while a 2 season tent might not be as pleasant during the winter. I receive questions like this all the time. "What sort of boot should I get?", Packs, tents... My answer is kind of consistent for most of them... You buy gear for what you are going to use ...


7

Of course. You can (almost) always cool down a 4-season tent, but you can't very well protect a 2-season tent from a blizzard. The primary concern is weight, but if you're going to be camping near a glacier with -5°C winds, you'll want a sturdy tent, so that's going to come at a certain cost of weight. To keep a tent cooler, you can pitch it in the ...


3

As Russell mentions, flagging tape can work well in this situation. I carry a roll in my first aid/survival kit, as it's also useful for marking your path if you're lost, among other uses. A more permanent and reflective alternative would be to get some type of reflective fabric and attach it to your fly. You could potentially sew it on, if you're not too ...


2

You can test everything at home, in your yard, and at the gym. At home, test your water filter, setting up the tent in the backyard, assembling and lighting your stove and boiling some water (don't forget your windscreen), any fishing gear you might have, and setting up a fire in your backyard. At the gym, take your loaded backpack with you and do some ...


5

I recommend reflective lines for at night, and standard flagging tape for during the day. Both are lightweight and the triptease line really jumps out at night when hit with a light.



Top 50 recent answers are included