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4

These are common in Australia, where snakes (9 out of the 10 most poisonous in the world) and spiders (another insane number of highly poisonous variety) along with other wild life (Crocodiles?, Bullsharks :) ) make tenting on the ground something for the more adventurous or short term residents of the world. They also have the advantage over RV's in that ...


3

The obvious disadvantages for these types of tents are that they occupy valuable roof space making mounting racks (e.g., bike, kayak, or gear) more difficult and that you must pack up your tent every time you want to drive someplace. As for advantages, they allow for a smaller footprint then having a car and a separate tent and can be pitched on uneven, ...


2

There are many homegrown solutions to this, such as latex glue or even duct tape. If you want to be extra cautious though, approach it like you were patching it. Find the recommended patch kit for that tent, sew the netting to the patches, then attach the patches as if it was a tear. I couldn't find an exact patch kit recommended by Quechua, but you can ...


2

Silpoly is based on polyester, which means it's hydrophobic (doesn't absorb water). Not all slippery materials are hydrophobic, but this definitely factors in. Silicone sealant also repels water, but through different properties. Those different properties are also the ones that let it adhere to many different surfaces. Silicone has a high coefficient of ...


0

While on a month long canoe trip we were using well-used tents, a tarp under the tent was usually all that was needed. But we did have a few nights where adding an extra tarp to the inside to keep sleeping bags dry was a great quick fix. Most people on the trip had their own tarps, though we were sharing the camp's tents.


3

Skirt. If you care a lot about wind and sand, then you should look for a tent with a skirt - many moutaneering-specific tents do have one. But skirt does increase the weight, so there's no right decision. I'd suppose a tent, that has a very small gap between a... uh, upper part, and a ground. Then you can just put some snow or sand there, to close the gap ...


2

Personally, I think that most decent backpacking tents will be fine for Iceland. The temperature is not extremely cold and you should be fine as long as you have a semi-decent sleeping bag. One thing I would recommend is getting a tent that can be self supporting (i.e. doesn't need pegging out to stand up) this can be very useful if you have to camp on ...



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