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I don't take a tent, I just take a tarp. Easier to pitch (if you have trees) In 30 years of experience (4-6 weeks per year) I've only once gotten actually wet doing this. Old tarp. Heavy rain. I pack the tarp last thing, to give it maximum drying time. If it's dry it goes in my pack. If wet, it gets rolled up in my foam pad. In the evening the ...


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I don't take a tarp to protect my tent, I take it to create another dry area outside - typically for cooking and eating. It can also create shade for cooking, eating, and just lounging around. (On a rainy day I'll lounge around in the tent if anywhere, but on a nice day there are lots of options.) Packing a wet tent won't damage it, but if your tent bag is ...


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You do not need a tarp in addition to the rainfly of your tent (that's what the rainfly is for). While it's always nicer to pack up a dry tent instead of a wet one, as long as you air dry the tent when you get home you'll have no problems with damaging the rainfly. If you do not dry your tent at home, it will mildew and smell really, really bad. I ...


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Scottish mountaineer Hamish Brown used such a tent back in 1974 while completing the first round of Munros (Scottish mountains over 3,000 feet) in a continuous walk. Hamish’s tent, made by Tulloch Mountaincraft, was a single skin nylon tapered ridge that weighed “a bit over 3lb” (1.3kg), which is lighter than many solo tents today. This tent had a ...



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