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Most small tents these days are pretty easy to set up, but you will have to do a little more than just "throw it at the ground". :-) In the US, we have a retail chain called Walmart that sells pretty cheap stuff. This is where I would go. I don't think they're in the UK. Maybe you have something similar. Some things to look for: What kind of weather ...


1

I narrowed the choices down on a few factors: 1) I wanted to spend under $400 for the tent since my wife and I will only use it a handful of times a year. I don't mind buying a nice tent if it's an older model and purchased off season. Perhaps that's way my fashion sense is always a year behind? 2) I was willing to trade weight for a bit of comfort and ...


4

Tenting with two people always comes down to a few items. How easy is it to get in/out? Is there enough room to fit both people and gear? How much does this thing weigh? Can we afford it? You've ruled out the cost. Given that all three tents have two doors, getting in and out should be equivalent. So it comes down to balancing weight vs. space. The ...


4

These three tents are very similar; freestanding, double-wall dome construction. The limelight is a bit heavier with more floor space. The trail light does not have a transversal pole. Any of them should do just fine. I used a similar tent, the MSR Hubba Hubba, for a while and was quite satisfied with the design. I now retired the Hubba Hubba in preference ...


3

In my experience, even heavy plastics tear easily with wind. This from trying to use such plastics to cover cargo that I'm hauling with a truck. I think this would be the only thing that would deter me from using such a thing as a tarp.


9

My other half used Tyvek when he was practicing Archery and one of the factors there was it had to be quiet, they used it for 4-6 hour stints to sit on. This is what he and some others in his club did: Wash it on a cotton / white cycle in your washing machine without any soap or detergent or powders. Wash it three times but let it dry thoroughly between ...


2

You could talk to the guys at Panther Primitives. They make high-quality canvas wall tents for the historical reenactment community, and they spend a sizeable amount of time camping in them. However, I really think your answer is a yurt (or ger). They are round, so that helps with high winds. They are big enough to walk around in. They have ...


5

Assuming you don't have an outer first tent pitching in the rain comes down to planning and practice. It is actually possible to stay fairly dry if you're organised. There is no sure fire method but there are a few tricks which can help you keep the inner dry. Don't wrap the tent poles up inside the tent, this will force you to unwrap the tent while it's ...


15

For tents that erect outer first, pitching in the rain is no different to any other time, just don't leave the dry inner out in the rain while putting the outer up. The outer will get wet on both sides anyway. To make this easier a bit of forward planning is useful, like pack the inner and outer separately so that you can just leave the inner in the car ...


17

There are all kinds of people who put up the fly first, then crouch under it putting up the inside. It's generally a very unpleasant experience from all I have heard, what with the crouching, crawling, and being rained on at least while getting the fly up. I handle it completely differently, because I have a free standing tent. On arrival at a site the very ...


4

Firstly, if possible, wait a while. Find somewhere to shelter out of the rain, and wait to see if the rain stops. For typical UK summer weather, most heavy rain is only short showers. So it will probably stop raining (or at least ease off) in 10 minutes or so. If its not going to stop raining, you can unpack your tent while under shelter. Then sort out ...


3

In addition to the other answers, if you expect heavy rain (I'm also heading for Snowdonia this weekend...) be careful about the location you choose as well. Avoid places near rivers or streams but also avoid hollows in the ground or the bottom of slopes. Your groundsheet may be waterproof but its sides only extend upwards for a certain length and it is ...


9

The outside of a tent is designed to get wet, the key trick is to keep everything else dry. You will want to pitch the outer first and only then add the inner. The other answer has covered that well. Some more general tips though is to have a look at the base of your inner tent and see how waterproof it is. A lot of ground sheets are not waterproof at all. ...


12

If the poles of your tent attach to the outer you're in luck. Before you go remove the inner from the outer and pack these separately, potentially wrap them in plastic bags or something so they stay dry. Then when you turn up your first task is to get the waterproof outer up as fast as possible. If it rains while you're putting this up, it's fine. Just ...


3

I have three tents, including an ultralight Big Agnes Fly Creek 2. The others are dome tents, including a Eureka Tetragon 2 and a Big Agnes four man tent. The Fly Creek is extremely light, but I only ever use it backpacking when I'll be the only one in it. It is too small to hang out in comfortably during extended bad weather, and there is only enough head ...


3

I see an ultralight tent as an expensive piece of backpacking equipment, with the alternative being a tarp. Compared to the tarp, the tent is slightly heaver, much more expensive, easier to set up, and keeps out bugs. I'm ready to buy one but hang on, why do they still make regular tents? What's the downside here? I would assume that the vast majority ...


9

I wouldn't buy an ultralight tent if you're going to put the tent through severe trauma or require significant space (e.g. to use chairs inside). I do think the main difference in buying is cultural; unless you are poking it with sticks tents shouldn't experience that much damage. The modern ultralights should be good for most any weather outside of ...



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