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11

I haven't tried it, but it looks ridiculous. If you are going to be hiking on flat and mildly rough terrain, why not get a bike with a lot of panniers. This provides for the same carrying capacity (maybe up to 40 kg). Probably will be less expensive than the trailer. There is an obvious advantage when going flat or downhill. Bikes have larger wheels than ...


10

If you treat your gear well, it will almost all last a whole thru-hike. Rain Jacket If you have a bad year, you can have 80+ days of rain, and the shoulder straps of your backpack will wear out (delaminate usually) the shoulders of your rain jacket. Shoes are covered over in the other question pretty thoroughly I'd say. Pants: If you wear pants, ...


9

Do boots really last (only) 400 miles? In short, yes. If you are a hard-man/woman, you might stretch one pair of boots to half the AT. Normal people go through quite a few pairs - I used 10-ish pairs of trail runners on the PCT, partially because my feet grew 2 sizes and I didn't realize that was why I was suddenly getting blisters from my previously ...


8

First, Freeze-dried Vegetables. Unfortunately, the texture isn't quite right, but it works. Secondly, if you want actual FRESH veggies, then I'd recommend sprouts grown in your pack Thirdly, if you will be resupplied during the trip, arrange a few fruits/veggies from the local store. I know through-hikers will go into town on resupply-day and eat in a ...


8

Compare the size of those wheels with the size of the wheels of outdoor vehicles, and you'll see that such small wheels can't work well in hard terrain! Probably even on dry meadow the energy you'll have to use to drag that device, which will constantly catch on blades of grass and other plants, would be much more than that you'll use to carry a backpack. ...


7

See the llamas looking at them weirdly at 2:10? That's because the llamas know how ridiculous it is! I'm not just referring to how it looks, I'm referring to the fact that in anything other than nice terrain it just doesn't look like it'll work. Fancy pulling that through a marsh? Even assuming the ground is solid (big assumption in the wilderness) the ...


5

The only real difference is that in a one piece double you don't have zips so the insulation is evenly distributed. The zips add some weight over a one piece but not much - it also won't pack quite as small but has the advantage that it can be split across two packs. Where you have zips, the insulation has gaps. So if you are going somewhere really cold, ...


5

I made my own hiking trailer - first version 2011. I pulled my hiking trailer in various environments. You can read more in my Wiki pages - the text is Finnish but you can use Google translator. In my Wikipages you can find answers to many guestions and problems. It really works very well in all terrain.


5

Couscous is one of the best sources of carbohydrate I've found. It's much denser than most forms of pasta so takes up less space, and can be cooked using much less fuel. Mixed with a packet of dried soup or even just chilli powder it's reasonably palatable, or you can chuck in anything else you can find (meat, veg, etc).


5

From your question, it sounds like you already have a plan to supply your body with calories. I'll further assume you will have protein and fat, not just carbohydrates. With those covered, you then need vitamins and minerals. Fiber is a good idea, too. It is possible to be healthy eating only wild animal foods (hunting / trapping) for quite some time, but ...


4

It somewhat depends on how warm you sleep and how much you're willing to layer up in your bag. I've met people who claim they used one 30F bag the whole trip (with thick layers at the start, and used as a quilt through the rest of the trip). I would call them "ultralight freaks". The more normal setup is to start with a 0-20F bag, depending on your normal ...


4

For pure calorific content, you cant beat Kendall Mint Cake. Its basically glucose, sugar and some mint essence, stores very well, is light, cheap and you can even make some yourself easily enough. There's a reason Edmund Hillary took it to Everest :-) Id also take lots of beef jerky, which is great protein for the weight. Various flavours and substitutes ...


4

There are several equivalents just as there is for the AT. I would consider Halfmile maps combined with PocketPCT. Halfmile's PCT maps 'Erik the Black' books PCT Data Book Pocket PCT U.S. Forest Service PCT Yogi's Wilderness Press books / databook ('official') The PCTA also provides a listing and sells books. Guthook has a review on his blog entry. I ...


3

This answer is mostly on comfort, for more technical/practical considerations, please consult Rory's answer above. I can express opinion about this double sleeping bag. Cheap, which affects it's other characteristics. Weights 3.6 kg, takes up most of the space in a large (60+)l backpack. Warmth is about the same as my single 3-season sleeping back. ...


3

I met a fellow from Holland using a Wheelie to hike across Canada. This was his third or fourth summer hiking across Canada and he recommended the Wheelie for anything close to what he was doing. He walked mostly without using his hands, but he loved the handles for when the road was rough. He was using roads exclusively. He had purchased the optional ...


3

Potato Chips: seriously good cal/weight ratio, come in a variety of flavors. Most will crumble quite easily but not too bad. Nido: this is dried whole milk, often found in the Mexican/international aisle of US grocery stores. It actually tastes very good, I often have some in the evening or morning for an extra boost. You can pair this with some "instant ...


3

For such a long trip, however, you should do your best to make your diet a little closer to a home diet if at all possible. While not as convenient as an MRE, a variety of simple minimally processed whole grains, seeds, and nuts are easily transported and cooked on the trail and are nutritious enough to support civilizations. Whole wheat, quinoa, brown ...


3

Depends on where you are going? Some places/nations will not allow certain food types. However to answer your question: Military Rations pricey but well known to be very shelf stable. However they are bulky and if you are hiking by yourself with no re-supply I assume space and weight are at a premium Survival Energy Bars - They are usually pretty compact, ...


3

I find tahini paste to be a useful trip food. According to wikipedia: Tahini is an excellent source of copper, manganese and the amino acid methionine. Tahini is a source of the healthy fatty acids omega-3 and omega-6. Tahini made from raw sesame seeds is lower in fat than tahini made from roasted seeds. Tahini's relatively high levels of ...


1

Although some of the articles there appear to require payment, BackpackingLight have lots of gear lists for different conditions, including both long and short trips. (This list specifically refers to the AT)



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