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32

Until just a few years ago I would have said tweezers. I use a tick key these days because it removes without squeezing the tick. I get between three and a dozen ticks a year (they like me), and I much prefer this to the tweezers. The big downside with tweezers is that you are compressing the tick's body and thus forcing liquid out of the tick and... ...


30

Use tweezers, grip as near to the head as you can, and pull gently and evenly but firmly - it should come off cleanly. If it doesn't then be sure to remove the head rather than just leave it in there. Then clean the area with alcohol and be sure to keep an eye on it in case any rashes or other untoward symptoms appear. The likelihood of this depends on the ...


19

You will pick up ticks by spending a lot of time outdoors, but I routinely find them after walking across 10 ft of grass between my car and my front door. No matter how much prevention you practice, keep an eye out for Lyme symptoms, and go to the doctor for antibiotics if they show up. A vaccine would be much nicer. The socks-in-your pants method is very ...


18

Gently and very slowly pull the tick out. Do not burn the tick. Do not twist the tick. Do not pour oil or alcohol on the tick. It is a living creature and as soon as you stress it out, it will start spitting and vomiting into your body.


17

Probably the single most important thing I do is to tuck the bottom of my pants into the socks. Ticks like to crawl upwards. If they drop onto your feet, they will crawls upwards on your leg looking for the first bit of soft skin with blood vessels close to the surface. If they can get inside your pants, they will find such skin eventually. Otherwise, ...


12

If a tick has already attached to you, I'd reccommend seeking out some medical help, but since we're in the outdoors group, what are the chances of there being one nearby? :) You should: Pour a little bit of spirits on the tick. That should both disinfect the area and stun the bugger a bit. Make a little loop of cotton, and try to pull out the tick, ...


11

Coincidentally one of the physicians of Tropical Disease at a major Toronto Hospital has recently done a write up on ticks and how to deal with them. You can find the full article here. Here is the relevant part in case the link breaks in the future. What you can do: Insect repellants are effective at keeping ticks away. Dr. Keystone also recommends ...


9

It's vital to get them off ASAP as the risk of infection from Lyme Disease increases after the first 24 hours, but the list of ways NOT to do this is probably more important ;-) Don't burn it, squeeze it, twist it, or cover it in alcohol/wax/marmalade/whatever. And -contrary to the accepted answer- if at all possible, DO NOT use tweezers: you need extreme ...


8

You should keep the bite site clean (make sure you got the whole tick out, and didn't leave the head behind, still in the skin). This is to avoid infection. Then, watch the area to look for a rash. The Lyme Disease rash generally (but not always) will have a bulls-eye pattern to it, with concentric circles of redness around the bite location. Some ...


8

To remove a tick that has attached to your skin: Use a pair of fine tipped tweezers and pull up evenly, i.e. with steady pressure. Don't twist or jerk, as this may leave body parts in the skin. If this happens, use the tweezers to pull them out. Also, don't forget to use rubbing/isopropyl alcohol to sterilize the tick site, as you want to make sure there ...


8

avoid grass and shrubs; keep your clothings shut tight, i.e. there should be as less places for the tick to get to your body as possible; wrap socks around pants, wear long-sleeved shirt, put something on your head; inspect yourself from time to time - especially after you've been to dense plants area; very simple, but still effective (saved me a couple of ...


7

Disclaimer: I have to deal with the possibility of 'mingling' with Ticks on an almost daily basis during the summer. And generally speaking am pretty up to date on 'tick stuff' however do not only take my word for it - Lyme Disease is serious - definitely look stuff up. First off, Lyme Disease is only transmitted by certain 'subspecies' of ticks. (If you'...


7

Ticks can attach anywhere, in particular, they will find spots like the back of your knee, around waistbands, under armpits, undergarment straps or any other constricted place. Firstly, prefer to wear the clothing which is already treated for tick prevention by means of some tick repellent solution. The solution is supposed to contain Permethrin. Spray ...


6

I contracted ehrlichiosis a couple years ago. I got a few dozen ticks during a hike and didn't notice for a few hours until I was home and in shorts after a shower. Here's what I learned: No, it doesn't need to be attached for 24 hours in order to infect you. It took a full week for symptoms to show up, but when they did, it was sudden and extreme. I ...


6

(I'm adding this as an answer, because it addresses some points in the original question as well as supplementing the tips given by other answerers, but although it's kind of supplementary, it is too long to be a comment. If that's not correct SE etiquette, please let me know, but I thought the guidance was important enough to be added here.) Avoidance ...


4

Ticks are arachnoids and have an interesting life-cycle that you must understand if you want to avoid them. What this diagram doesn't explain is how the tick seeks a host. There may be as many as five blood meals in the life of a tick. Each is followed by moulting after which the tick climbs tall grass. It hangs from the end of a frond, waving barbed ...


4

I'm a bit surprised to see that nobody else as suggested this, but powder the top of your shoes/socks and bottom of your pants with sulfur. Powdered sulfur is available at local feed/ranch stores, and maybe even Wal-Mart or Lowes, depending on where you are. It's inexpensive and you can use an old sock as a very effective applicator. So as the others have ...


4

I pull them off gently, and if their head detaches in my skin (rarely happens), I'll dig it out with a needle or tweezers. Then add neosporin, and occasionally look for oddly-shaped rashes. If you spray your socks with deet, it will help keep them off.


4

Some important additional points about Lyme disease: Deer ticks in the nymph stage have a much higher chance of transmission. So if it's anywhere near as big as the one in the picture included with the question, there's a good chance right there not to worry. Nymphs are tiny. The tick must be attached for at least 24 hours typically before there's any ...


3

Put on neosporin and keep an eye on it for a few days looking for an oddly shaped rash. More info on Lime disease: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002296/ More info on Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: http://oklahomapoison.org/general/tick.asp More detailed tick first aid: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/first-aid-tick-bites/FA00062 I would ...


3

I think it's good to wear long clothes and close all small entry spots through the layers. You can also use some repellents that contain 20 to 30% DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide) for your skin and permethrin for your clothes. But for hunting and also if you're doing some sport or work it's normal that you can't protect yourself 100% from tick bites. I ...


1

Stay inside. Being outside is fraught with dangers. There is good advice here. I lean more to the "inspection after the fact" camp. I don't think prevention is statistically better than inspection enough to warrant the expense and time required to do so. I believe it would detract from the experience and start the excursion off with a mindset of fear ...


1

I have never heard of shampoo being a tick deterrent or being more efficient at tick removal than say washing your hair simply with water. If you are in an area where diseases transmitted by ticks are an issue then I'd suggest you use the common safety procedures: vaccination search your body before going to bed/while showering (it's best to have somebody ...


1

As @wedapashi already stated, permethrin is a very good choice. And even though it's an insecticide, I find it works well as a repellent also. I treat all my clothing (even socks and underwear) and gear. I can't even remember the last time I found a tick on me. Even keeps the mosquitoes away. Once dry, it's safe for all animals (except insects). ...


1

In my experience ticks hold on very strongly with their bite. I would not recommend any make-shift way of removing them. When using tweezers for example you take the risk of clipping off the body from the head. Leaving that small part stuck might then lead to inflammation. For several years now I’ve been using special “tick pliers” (see also): They have a ...



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