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15

It is fairly common to store duct tape just below the handle of your trekking poles. This is my preferred way as it is always accessible. Some people prefer to wrap it around Nalgene bottles. An alternative you could also buy it in small square pieces instead of the typical roll. I usually place about 10 layers around each poles. I would not bring three ...


12

I know you said in your question that you don't want to bring a whole roll, but I've found that Duct Tape can be easily collapsable if you use a knife and cut out the cardboard inside of the roll. After that, take a strip of Duct Tape, fold it on itself and stick it to half of the inside roll. Flatten the roll and you have a rectangle of usefulness. (o) ...


11

I too prefer good old magnesium carbonate. My favorite is the block form (I haven't noticed a difference between brands), which usually can be found for a better price if you look through retailers who market to gymnasts rather than climbers. I'll list below the different kinds of chalk and grip aids that I have experience with and the merits/demerits of ...


10

Duct tape wraps around items fairly and can be stored by wrapping on your gear. Nalgene (or similar) water bottles have a good shape for keeping the tape flat. I have wrapped tape around spare batteries, but the tape was wider than the batteries were long. Even so, to the tape was usable. The water bottles would also better in that you don't have to ...


7

The pro of a fire steel over other lighters is that there's little that can break or be damaged from weather. Even if you lose the striker, a steel knife will work with the flint. However the con is that you only get a spark, not a steady flame. That means it needs to hit something that will ignite very easily. I use it to light my stoves (alcohol and ...


5

The answer is in your bowing action - the travel comes from your arm movement not being in a straight line each direction: there is a bias one way or the other. Usually the bias is in the direction that relieves the string overlap, in your case this is up the way, so you need to actively bias the other way slightly. I find it is easier to bias against an ...


5

What I do is wrap the duct tape around a pencil. I just wrap as much as I might need and since I also need/want to take a pencil it kills two birds with one stone. I've been doing this for years.


5

You can buy much smaller rolls in most department stores or from the dollar store, sometimes they are the decorated kind instead of gray (check the boxing and tape section of the store) but the amount on the roll is much less than a standard massive home-improvement-store roll. With a smaller, lighter roll (or nearly used roll like someone suggested) you can ...


4

I would recommend a site like CalTopo (my favorite) or Hillmap; you can import GPX files into them, or click on points to define a path. For Caltopo, creating a path by clicking might not be immediately obvious; first choose "Add New Object", then select "Line", and once you've edited any details you can click each waypoint or hold down shift while ...


4

I've always folded it on itself. One of my OCD things is getting other things sticky via the use of duct tape so I never wrap it around a bottle or pole, however I've seen plenty who do this with no trouble... Anyway, I prepare it by folding about quarter inch patches over each other (kind of like packing a tent that you fold instead of roll). I would not ...


4

The big plus with a firesteel is that you can pretty much do what you want to it, including soaking the thing in ice cold water, and it'll still work as well as before. The big downside is it's just sparks, so it's harder to build a fire. However, with practice, it's not that hard and does provide a good backup if your matches get soaked through and your ...


3

For central Europe I can recommend www.wanderreitkarte.de, which is a German site but has also an English and Italian language layer. Its data is based on openstreetmap data which is (at least in Germany) much more detailed off the beaten track than google maps is. Unfortunately it does not contain Norway, where your hike has obviously been done. ...


3

This (Jetboil Crunchit Recycling Tool) was found by googling "crush isobutane fuel can" and reading this second result (right below the outoors.SE question) for the link.


2

Wrap the string around the shaft in the opposite direction. Then it will tend to go down, but your uneven pushing and pulling will counteract it. If that doesn't work, try cutting a slot in the shaft and putting a keeper (such as a star washer) on it. You can also try this.


2

They are all very similar. I've attempted to summarise below: Chalk Pure natural calcium carbonate, nothing else. Advantages: It's natural, it doesn't dry your hands out (as much), you're not going to leave chemicals on holds and it'll wash off without leaving a trace, cheap Disadvantage: It can get a bit sticky and gritty on your hands, needs replacing ...


2

You cannot effectively navigate a bearing without a compass. However if you loose your compass, break it, or otherwise forget it, all is not lost. You will need several items to fix this situation. Some conductive wire - at least 6 inches of it A harder metal object like a pin, needle, or small nail. Something small that floats in liquid. A container ...


2

Cheaper and easier solution. Attach your stove thingy (In my case, a pocket rocket). Open all the way and invert the can (away from flame sources obviously). Use a cheap and old fashioned church key to puncture the side. Total cost, approx. $0.50.


1

How about a center or cross cut to create "post-it" strips? If any of the resulting pieces are too heavy you could just peel off a few (cm)s of layer. --(-)-- The problem with buying pre-cut pieces is there is typically a mark-up in price.



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