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His opinion was that I could tie an overhand for the master point and be just as safeā€“the only downside being that it would be more difficult to untie after being loaded. Yes, this is correct. Many people seem to think that commonly used climbing knots can slip if there's not enough friction to make them hold, and that we should choose a knot based on ...


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To add to a set of already great answers I would like to add two points: Glued bolts and weird old bolts. There are generally two types of bolts used presently: Mechanical and glued bolts. Mechanical bolts are mostly sleeve anchors: When tightening the nut the first time a cone is driven under the sleeve which is thus forced against the wall of the borehole....


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In old routes in European (at least) mountains and in quarries used by cavers for training you can find small expansion bolts called spits or Cheville Autoforeuse. They use just 8 mm thick screws and are very short because they are often drilled by hand. You often need your own hangers but sometimes they could be pre-installed. These can fail. Cavers never ...


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Doesn't really matter for top roping, you've got so much rope out when you're top roping that when you take a fall pretty much all the force is absorbed by the rope, your anchor is holding only a little more than the body weight of you and your belayer most of the time. Mountain guides will tie an overhand knot, figure eight, or figure nine depending on ...


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This answer does not provide much new information to Ben Crowell's and Charlie Brumbaugh's, but I am not entirely in agreement with all their different conclusions. TLDR: In your use case and most use cases strength reduction by a knot is not an issue, so use whatever save knot you are comfortable with. In general consider the rule of 50% strength reduction ...



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