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14

Both, sport climbing and trad climbing are a form of lead climbing, which means the first climber to go up is not protected by a rope from above. A sport climber just uses carries quick draws that, as you mentioned, get clipped to bolts that have been placed in 10 to 15 foot intervals. At the end of the climb, a sport climber can expect to find a belay ...


7

I love doing routes with 3 people. Once you are efficient at it, those don't take much longer than going with 2 people, you have someone to talk to when the leader is taking forever, and you have an additional hand, if you need it (for taking pictures, dealing with rope tangle, keeping an eye out on the weather, another belayer if the leader gets in ...


7

before reading any of this please remember safety first. If you are not comfortable with placement for any reason then you probably shouldn't be placing it there. NEVER sacrifice safety for convince. All suggestions here are for placement concerning removal NOT safety ,direction of pull or anything else. Also, there is no substitute for experience or an ...


6

Rockfax have a handy conversion chart this is the generally accepted version though it is (like all climbing grades) subjective. Below are the conversion charts: "Bold" trad routes "Safe" Trad Routes Bouldering


6

By coincendince, I asked the same question to a guide last weekend. His response was this: There is going to be some reduction in the strength of the webbing from the girth hitch. Especially thinner materials like dynemma. Its going to be minor, but still there. Its possible to carry a small number of slings (2 or 3) over your shoulder, with 1 carabiner ...


6

In general it sounds you're not doing anything obviously stupid and you just need more practice. I generally rack some 'draws on both sides - sometimes it can be handy to avoid reaching across. And you can often avoid the 'draw falling into the crack by resting it on a hold, across your wrist or something like that. Try not to place/clip gear far above ...


5

It's not complicated. Let's say you're using a long piece of webbing to build the anchor. Before you tie the ends of the webbing to make a loop, you put the webbing through the rap ring. Then when you form the loop, the ring is linked into it. When you form the master point of the anchor (i.e., the loop that you would normally put a locking biner through), ...


5

The best way, when it works It usually works to grab the whole mass of coils, and flip them over when handing them to the second. When you're doing this, care has to be taken that you don't wrap one of the ends around one of the climber's anchor cord. The leader (when bringing up the second) has to make sure that the loops are neatly and tightly stacked, ...


5

You probably want your tool to have a longer extension, more like 100 cm. If this length bothers you, consider using an extendable bungee cord (e.g. 80 cm long, which you can stretch to 100 cm); twist it so it compacts itself when retracted. It might be possible to use a spiral/telephone cord, however it may be too bulky (I have seen it used for ice axes, ...


5

You leave behind gear sufficient to create a rappel anchor that is strong enough for any conceivable load that may be placed upon it. This is no different from any other properly constructed rappel anchor, the specifics of which vary with the placement and circumstance. The only situation I can conceive that one would have to violate this rule is in a true ...


4

You don't need a trad rack of your own in order to follow. If you're climbing with experienced trad leaders who have their own racks, then you also don't need to bring your own rack. If you're going to lead, you just borrow their gear. In your situation, there is really no advantage to buying a lot of trad gear before you try following on trad climbs at all. ...


4

You extend placements with trad draws when the line you are climbing wanders, in order to minimize rope drag. You do not always need to extend them. I climb with a mix of short sport-type draws and extendable trad draws for that reason. Sometimes you can even just clip the racking biner that the cam was hanging on already (obviously for nuts or anything ...


4

The knot reduced the runner rating in half, but since there are two strands , its back to the UIAA standard of 22KN ... The 22kN rating is for the loop strength of the sling, not the single-strand strength. Therefore any reduction in strength caused by a knot puts the strength below the 22kN standard. Stated strength for a girth hitch varies from ...


3

Under-camming and camming angle are two very different things. The camming angle is constant for the whole range of the cam and is defined by the shape of the cam-lobe and can range from 12.5 degrees to up to 21 degrees (Black Diamond's C4s for example have a camming angle of 14.5 degrees.) An undercammed cam has the same holding strength as a cam in its ...


3

Wild Country's nut tool has a spring leach with a tiny biner. See here Ive used it many times and the leash provides enough length for almost any position and the spring keeps it closer to you body.


2

When I am trad-climbing (actually generally when rock-climbing), I carry 60cm (shoulder length) and 120cm slings. Some 60cm slings set up as alpine draws, the rest over my shoulder. When setting up a belay station, 60cm slings tend to be too short. When using a double boolean as central point, that uses already most of the sling length. Further, when ...


2

One thing I think that's missing from Ben's answer is a half rope. If your climbing on a trad route that moves about a lot you'll want to use two half ropes rather than a standard single rope. The idea behind a half/double rope is that it reduces drag, if you have two anchors that are far apart on the same route, this can produce a Z in the rope which ...


1

Something we used to do in the UK bitd was use three half ropes tied in a triangle. A bit more weight, a bit more cluster potential, but allows leading through without any of the time-consuming and dangerous re-tying.



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