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9

Both, sport climbing and trad climbing are a form of lead climbing, which means the first climber to go up is not protected by a rope from above. A sport climber just uses carries quick draws that, as you mentioned, get clipped to bolts that have been placed in 10 to 15 foot intervals. At the end of the climb, a sport climber can expect to find a belay ...


7

I love doing routes with 3 people. Once you are efficient at it, those don't take much longer than going with 2 people, you have someone to talk to when the leader is taking forever, and you have an additional hand, if you need it (for taking pictures, dealing with rope tangle, keeping an eye out on the weather, another belayer if the leader gets in ...


6

In general it sounds you're not doing anything obviously stupid and you just need more practice. I generally rack some 'draws on both sides - sometimes it can be handy to avoid reaching across. And you can often avoid the 'draw falling into the crack by resting it on a hold, across your wrist or something like that. Try not to place/clip gear far above ...


5

The best way, when it works It usually works to grab the whole mass of coils, and flip them over when handing them to the second. When you're doing this, care has to be taken that you don't wrap one of the ends around one of the climber's anchor cord. The leader (when bringing up the second) has to make sure that the loops are neatly and tightly stacked, ...


5

It's not complicated. Let's say you're using a long piece of webbing to build the anchor. Before you tie the ends of the webbing to make a loop, you put the webbing through the rap ring. Then when you form the loop, the ring is linked into it. When you form the master point of the anchor (i.e., the loop that you would normally put a locking biner through), ...


4

You leave behind gear sufficient to create a rappel anchor that is strong enough for any conceivable load that may be placed upon it. This is no different from any other properly constructed rappel anchor, the specifics of which vary with the placement and circumstance. The only situation I can conceive that one would have to violate this rule is in a true ...


4

You don't need a trad rack of your own in order to follow. If you're climbing with experienced trad leaders who have their own racks, then you also don't need to bring your own rack. If you're going to lead, you just borrow their gear. In your situation, there is really no advantage to buying a lot of trad gear before you try following on trad climbs at all. ...


3

Under-camming and camming angle are two very different things. The camming angle is constant for the whole range of the cam and is defined by the shape of the cam-lobe and can range from 12.5 degrees to up to 21 degrees (Black Diamond's C4s for example have a camming angle of 14.5 degrees.) An undercammed cam has the same holding strength as a cam in its ...


3

You extend placements with trad draws when the line you are climbing wanders, in order to minimize rope drag. You do not always need to extend them. I climb with a mix of short sport-type draws and extendable trad draws for that reason. Sometimes you can even just clip the racking biner that the cam was hanging on already (obviously for nuts or anything ...


2

One thing I think that's missing from Ben's answer is a half rope. If your climbing on a trad route that moves about a lot you'll want to use two half ropes rather than a standard single rope. The idea behind a half/double rope is that it reduces drag, if you have two anchors that are far apart on the same route, this can produce a Z in the rope which ...



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