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9

Off width cracks are cracks that are too big to finger jam or fist jam, but too small for you to fit inside and chimney climb, so you have to come up with really awkward and very physically excerting moves to get up them, like climbing upside down (literally). Basically they are cracks that are just the right width to not be fun, and take a lot of physical ...


8

They are user replaceable, in fact some manufacturers recommend replacing slings every 2-5 years if they're very frequently used, but they're only user replaceable if you know how to sew structural climbing gear and have the equipment to bartack a loop of SuperTape or 10mm Dynex. The simplest thing to do is simply replace the worn sling with 1" tube ...


8

The best way to lear how to place protections is to climb sport routes that are also suited to protection placement. Bring plenty of quickdraws (and of gear to place of course). Use the bolts, but place protections as if those were your only alternative up there. This will, as the very first and foremost thing, allow you to place plenty of them. The more, ...


7

Double Rope You need two ropes (of obviously different colours so as not to confuse them). Tie into both ropes, one on each side of your belay loop, your seconds will each tie into the other end of one of the ropes. When you set up your belay after you've led the climb, put both ropes into your belay device, you can belay for both of your seconds at once. ...


6

While belaying two seconds at once using the method ShemSeger pointed out is my favorite, it does take a fair amount of experience. If you're just starting out, I recommend you use the Caterpillar technique: You lead on a single rope and belay the second as you would normally, except the second climber trails another rope behind them and clips it into each ...


5

The information you need is on the manufacturers website. We offer servicing for DMM Cams (trigger wires and slings), and Torque Nuts (slings) if they pass a quality inspection. Prior to sending them to us, we ask you to inspect and assess your gear in accordance to the supplied user instructions and inspection criteria. for others considering ...


5

Liam hinted at the method that was popular in the US while back, and probably still is: follow an experienced climber and clean their gear. You'll get to see actual placements & find out how hard or easily a piece of pro should come out. Aid climbing (with bounce testing) is a great way to learn too. And a great way to kill six hours going only 100 ...


5

In the UK trad climbing is the most popular form of outdoor rock climbing: there are sport routes but there are many many more trad routes, so many people (me included) actually trad climb before they sport climb (outdoors anyway). Instruction Obviously the best (and safest) way to learn is from someone more experienced than yourself. Three good options ...


5

I don't grab the biner first, I grab the cam first, pretty much as I would if I were placing it, I then unclip the biner from my gear loop with the cam in hand. There's no fumbling with it during or after, the more steps you put into placing gear, the more likely you are to drop it. I watched a video of this one girl climbing a 5.14 on trad, she had her gear ...


4

Your main concern here is going to be shock loading. Nuts are typically tested to resist static compression load. Any shock is typically adsorbed by the rope and other equipment, so they get the mimimum shock load when/if you fall. If they don't fit well and are loose (or are just passed though a hole and are therefore moving around all over the place) then ...


4

Before I started to trad climb, I was using mobile protection in an alpine environment. As a consequence, I never fell into a piece of gear and belays (that were not bolted) were save by location, often by slinging some big rock. This is the extreme case, but also when starting to trad climb the same happened: I didn't have much experience so I wasn't sure ...


4

Learning how to place gear is a lot different than actually using it. Trad climbers place their pro, but hope they never have to fall on it. They give it a few tugs, maybe weight it to make sure it'll hold, but for the most part it's there just in case of a fall. Aid climbers on the other hand, they use every piece of gear that they place, they get real ...


4

I assume you are only looking for options by going from belay to belay (as opposed to continuous securing like going on taught rope). Method using half-ropes: You tie in on both ropes, your partners on a single one each. They belay you normally on both ropes until you set up the belay-station. Then you secure them using a Munter hitch or a tuber like ...


4

The answer in my mind is simple and straight forward. Leave the minimum amount of gear required to make a good/acceptable anchor everytime. What that looks like will depend on the situation at hand. In some cases this will be two carabiners and a sling, in others it will be three big cams and a cordelette. If you're lucky then it might be nothing due to a ...


3

Its pretty easy for the 2 seconds being together or always nearby, and a bit stretchy for the one leading the climb (You). When I did one similar not-so-tough scramble,I used a trick that at least worked for me. I was climbing on a single ropes, tied at the center & the two idiots with me were on a single strand each. I used a 8mm'er Beal Cobra rope, ...


3

My philosophy when bailing from routes is to first try and escape to an easier route. If that fails try and down climb/down lead. If all else fails, rappel off a single bomber piece. Ideally the single piece is a bolt or natural feature, but if not a nut. I have never left a cam. My basic setup is as follows. Identify both a bomber placement and a second 2 ...


3

Yes, this will reduce the strength of your sling. Look at the rating on your carabiner, though. It's probably something like: 23kn, 7kn, 7kn. What will reduce the strength of your system most? Loading your biner sideways! This technique is a great way to mitigate that risk. Much more worth the reduction in strength of the sling, even if it is as much as ...


2

I use a loop of 6 mm cord 5.5 m (18 ft) in circumference. Buy some larger amount of 6 mm cord, because the price for the pre-cut cord is a rip-off, and you'll end up going through this stuff for Prusiks and various other uses. You will of course need a little extra length in order to tie the bend. There is no way to say what is the amount of cord needed for ...


1

To set an equalized 3 point anchor, at a minimum you need 3 single length sling (2 ft) lops (6 feet total), a 1-foot, 3-strand, clip in loop (3 feet total), and a couple feet for the knot. With such a minimum length cordelette, the anchor in the photo, would need an extra quick draw (or possibly even a single length sling) for the piece on the left and maybe ...


1

I would like to point out that in my line of work, we have retrievable ring and webbing anchors. They're called ring and rings. They probably wouldn't work in every circumstance, but i know that they would work in some. Just look up ring and ring friction savers.



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