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11

Are my fears of the anchor pieces popping out justified? Yes. This is an especially big concern when the climber has already placed the first piece of pro above the anchor, but falls before getting a second piece in. The fall factor can be large, and the direction of pull is up. If you don't have any gear that can hold against an upward pull, then your ...


7

Rockfax have a handy conversion chart this is the generally accepted version though it is (like all climbing grades) subjective. Below are the conversion charts: "Bold" trad routes "Safe" Trad Routes Bouldering


6

Wikipedia has a simple treatment of this problem, as well as some notes on at least one of the reasons why the simple treatment is only a very rough approximation. Let be the impact force quoted by the manufacturer, which is normally 12 kN for a single rope. Let be the 80 kg mass used for lab tests, let , let and let f=h/L be the fall factor ...


5

You probably want your tool to have a longer extension, more like 100 cm. If this length bothers you, consider using an extendable bungee cord (e.g. 80 cm long, which you can stretch to 100 cm); twist it so it compacts itself when retracted. It might be possible to use a spiral/telephone cord, however it may be too bulky (I have seen it used for ice axes, ...


5

Double Rope You need two ropes (of obviously different colours so as not to confuse them). Tie into both ropes, one on each side of your belay loop, your seconds will each tie into the other end of one of the ropes. When you set up your belay after you've led the climb, put both ropes into your belay device, you can belay for both of your seconds at once. ...


5

If the crack was good enough for your anchor all on its own, there are a couple of ways to use that: redirect a regular direct belay: hang a karabiner from a sling around the tree belay sitting on the ledge, redirecting the live rope through that karabiner here, you're just using the tree to avoid pulling the second off sideways or letting excessive ...


5

I don't know what the rules are where you climb, but those kinds of situations–where you find a bomber belay point (comfy ledge), but no suitable anchor points–are where I'm temped to bolt an anchor or two. I like to keep a couple pieces of hardware on me specifically for when I need to make an anchor where there's no natural protection, and I'm an advocate ...


4

When I am trad-climbing (actually generally when rock-climbing), I carry 60cm (shoulder length) and 120cm slings. Some 60cm slings set up as alpine draws, the rest over my shoulder. When setting up a belay station, 60cm slings tend to be too short. When using a double boolean as central point, that uses already most of the sling length. Further, when ...


4

Before I started to trad climb, I was using mobile protection in an alpine environment. As a consequence, I never fell into a piece of gear and belays (that were not bolted) were save by location, often by slinging some big rock. This is the extreme case, but also when starting to trad climb the same happened: I didn't have much experience so I wasn't sure ...


4

Learning how to place gear is a lot different than actually using it. Trad climbers place their pro, but hope they never have to fall on it. They give it a few tugs, maybe weight it to make sure it'll hold, but for the most part it's there just in case of a fall. Aid climbers on the other hand, they use every piece of gear that they place, they get real ...


3

While belaying two seconds at once using the method ShemSeger pointed out is my favorite, it does take a fair amount of experience. If you're just starting out, I recommend you use the Caterpillar technique: You lead on a single rope and belay the second as you would normally, except the second climber trails another rope behind them and clips it into each ...


3

Its pretty easy for the 2 seconds being together or always nearby, and a bit stretchy for the one leading the climb (You). When I did one similar not-so-tough scramble,I used a trick that at least worked for me. I was climbing on a single ropes, tied at the center & the two idiots with me were on a single strand each. I used a 8mm'er Beal Cobra rope, ...


3

Wild Country's nut tool has a spring leach with a tiny biner. See here Ive used it many times and the leash provides enough length for almost any position and the spring keeps it closer to you body.


2

Personally, I can easily see how this unintended loading can happen. Second gets to a tricky part, asks leader for beta, leader moves over to get a better view of second. This question is an example of one of the really hard problems in climbing. It's almost impossible to get feedback about how well you are building your anchors. You just don't get many ...


2

If the top biner gets loaded weirdly against a hanger, a fixed connection to the sling (girth hitch) makes it more likely that the biner will break. This is why non-alpine draws have the top biner free and the bottom one fixed. Petzl Manual


1

This is a good calculator to use, just plug in the data you know and it'll give you an accurate answer and save you some number crunching. If you want to do it by hand wikipedia has a formula and a better explanation here.


1

I assume you are only looking for options by going from belay to belay (as opposed to continuous securing like going on taught rope). Method using half-ropes: You tie in on both ropes, your partners on a single one each. They belay you normally on both ropes until you set up the belay-station. Then you secure them using Munter hitch or a tuber like system ...



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