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17

As a New Englander who hikes a lot, I’d say that the sight of any good signage is so startling and unexpected that the appearance of the material should be a distant secondary concern to the signs’ utility. There are a few things to consider that you haven’t mentioned: How long will you be on this trail committee? Are you likely to have other board ...


13

Switzerland has a nationally consistent policy for hiking signs with Swiss precision (for example and inspiration, see this impressive 64 page guide on signage), as required by law. This applies whether in the high mountains, on easy forest trails, or (usually short segments) on rural roads. You might find a sign indicating it's 5 hours and 55 minutes ...


11

Here is a bridge design we (the Town of Groton Massachusetts Trails Committee) used recently that seems to work. It feels plenty strong and sturdy when walking on it. The first bridge of this kind was only installed two months ago, so we don't yet have any direct evidence how long it lasts. However, we were generally pleased with the outcome, and are ...


8

My only experience with this is as a hiker, and I can only give my own opinion. But first: Examples In the Columbia River Gorge there are a few different types of signage used. Major road-side signs: Trailhead signs: Junction signs: Masonry signs: Unlike the stone sign WedaPashi showed the lettering on these masonry signs is quite fine, so ...


5

IMHO, I would like to suggest using the ones made with plastic, probably Custom Engraved Signs. I believe its about personal opinion up to certain extent. The people who are suggesting you to use wooden trail signs are right about the fact that we should never put on something in nature there, which is made up of plastic in particular. But on the contrary ...


5

I have been researching sign construction various ways, with asking a question here being one of them. I was just forwarded a email from Adobe Signs, replying to questions from the Groton Conservation Trust (our local private land trust). Adobe Signs is the regular sign maker used by the Trust for their roadside signs. These signs are dark-stained wood ...


4

A general answer to a general question Long distance through hiking is a fairly well developed activity in terms of common best practices. I would suggest picking up a book on more popular through trails (The Appalachian Trail or Pacific Crest trail in the U.S.) that has many handy suggestions. Take from it what you will based on the terrain you will cover. ...


4

This is an extremely long trail. Very good walkers are able to do 30-50 km (depending on weather and terrain) each day for a very long time. But for seasoned (though physically very fit) walker a realistic estimate is on avg. 25 km/day. So for 7000 km you would need 280 days. According to the article on outdoorseiten.de the trail part in Romania is not done ...


4

The answer has already been picked, but I want to throw in my 2 cents as well. While I'm not against plastic, the sample you show turns me off. Looks too urban. If they make one that looks more natural, then I'm all for it. Also, I think signage should be minimal. Trailheads and big intersections. Along the trail I like painted blazes. When it comes to ...


2

There are quite a number of options, although the 4000 foot requirement pretty much limits it to the White Mountains of NH, the northern Green Mountains of VT, and a few peaks in ME. It's not clear if you want to or need to do a out and back, or if you can spot a car and do a traverse. Here are just a few options that come to mind without looking things up ...


2

Check out the Devil's Path in the Catskills: Long Path A little further north in the Adirondacks is the Northville-Placid Trail:


2

Naismith's rule is a good starting point, but it doesn't really cover unusual trail conditions. My rule of thumb is to convert distance, elevation, and trail condition to "equivalent miles": Each mile is a mile. Each 500 feet of elevation gain is a mile. Distance traveled on snow or loose rock counts double. Distance traveled above 7000 feet elevation ...


2

I found a good service to use for the shuttling at Devil's Path. Just in case someone else needs help, it looks like Smiley's Transport in Tannersville, NY is a service that people use frequently. I just spoke with them on the phone and they were familiar with the trail and location. I plan to use them when I hike the trail. Follow Up We did the hike in ...


2

There are some great backpacking loops in Northren PA. Off the top of my head I know of the Allegheny Front Trail and The Olde Loggers Path Check out http://www.midatlantichikes.com/pa.htm and also http://www.pahikes.com/ for some great PA hikes


1

Have you considered the Finger Lakes Trail? It's certainly long enough, and has lean-tos along most of its length. There aren't a lot of loops, but you may be able to arrange a one-way with return by car or public transport. (In particular, the section around Ithaca crosses county bus routes at several places.)


1

NZ Topo Map - www.topomap.co.nz is a great resource. You can highlight the area of map you're interested in and print it out in high quality to take with you. If you have a Windows Phone then you can download the NZ Topo Map app and take sections offline with you. Or if you have an Android phone, New Zealand Topo Maps Pro by Atlogis is a great app for ...


1

Last year I was taught an approximation by a mountaineer guide. It is an average and worked quite well for me. Of course you need adaption for alpine tours (3000m+), physical condition, weather, extremely rough paths and so on. The rule is: 4km per hour on a flat path 400m altitude per hour take the so calculated longer time and add the half of the ...



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