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11

You have a few options: Don't worry about the lease and accept the fact that you may lose your security deposit. You can take the board down before you move out, spackle over the holes, and hope the landlord doesn't notice. I live in the US, and that seems to be the preferred option here. Everyone I know who has a hangboard has done this, and they seem ...


8

Rather than try to answer the personal part of your question, which as Liam said needs a doctor's attention to answer properly, I shall reply to the more general title: Can a Finger Pulley injury be predicted / anticipated? In an absolute sense I do not believe it can be. In a relative sense it is caused high stress on these "pulleys" so avoiding hard use ...


7

General fitness is the only technique you can employ without going to higher altitudes. Acclimatization is the most common technique. Altitude sickness occurs at 2,400 m, so you go to a base camp (for example Cuzco if you're doing the Incan trail, or the South/North Base camps for Everest) and you let your body adjust to the altitude over a few days ...


7

There isn't necessarily a way to prepare your body for the altitude. You should however: Be in good condition overall, i.e. able to handle at sea level more than you are planning to do at altitude. Try to spend several days at a lower altitude (like 7000 feet) doing some aerobic activity before trying to go higher. Drink more water than usual. Take ...


7

Rest! I know you're going to want to climb every second of every day but you must give your ligaments time to heal! Muscle takes two days to repair however ligaments can take 1 -2 weeks. Gradually increase your time climbing, this will greatly reduce the chance of injury. Familiarize yourself with all the necessary safety requirements, do you know what a ...


6

In general you can't do that much in two weeks, regardless being 20 or 80 years old. It depends on your general fitness level and your life habits. If you usually are a healthy living (wo)man, being active, eating balanced, no-drinker, no-smoker and so on, it will be easier to get a proper endurance level. On the other side I don't think you can achieve a ...


6

Aerobic conditioning will help a little with the altitude. You can practice walking / running on a treadmill at 15% incline. You can practice walking with a loaded backpack. Bonus points for doing it on an inclined treadmill.


6

According the the UIAA: International Mountaineering and Climbing Federation After 8850 feet a rate of 1250 feet per day above the previous days sleeping altitude is a generally appropriate rate of ascent. Usually after 2700m, not to climb more than 400m from the previous night’s sleeping altitude would be a reasonable recommendation. Climbing high ...


5

As I noted in my answer to that question, plasticene or stress balls work. Also, you can use guitarist's finger exercisers I do like your idea of using less fingers for carrying bags etc.


5

In my opinion there are a couple valid reasons to use sand paper. File down current calluses, therefore avoiding large calluses from getting snagged/pinching itself resulting in a flapper(ripped piece of skin only attached at a small point). Toughen up the skin, resulting in less sensitive and more durable skin. When you are a beginner it will take time ...


5

I'm not 74, but I'm closer to it than to 24. If you can walk for an hour easily, you can probably walk for 10 hours easily. That's basically how humans are built - we can walk the entire time we are awake (unlike our ancient prey, who literally cannot do that.) Some people can't walk for an hour, but I really don't know of people who can walk for 5 hours but ...


5

Is it possible to compare stats from this to what is required to be able to do this hike? VO2 max is the best indicator of fitness. Running will increase your VO2 max. VO2 max is the amount of Oxygen your blood can hold per Kg per minute. This is an important factor in all endurance exercise, especially exercise at altitude. The higher your VO2 max ...


5

I don't think it is difficult to give an exact correlation between running time and hiking endurance. I think this is impossible. I will give you an example from myself: I am not a good runner because my lungs aren't the best. Nonetheless I can hike quite a lot and had no problems at 12.500 ft. Also 6000 ft a single day up/down were possible. Still I am ...


4

Any 8-10 mm nylon rope will hold many, many times more than your body weight. Climbing ropes are designed to hold dynamic falls, not just static body weight. You could easily get away with 6 mm accessory cord, which is a lot cheaper than a climbing rope. It holds about 700 kg.


4

Just keep climbing-is sort of the right answer, but you need to fit it in to your training and recovery schedule. I kept climbing all the way through training for various marathons. My solution was to do a climb a week in place of one of my small to medium sized runs. If this happened to be right after a really long run then I might focus more on ...


4

Whilst walking about, clench your fist, then stretch your hand open again. repeat this 30 times (or whatever you want) and relax. Bit by but, maybe one or two a day, increase the reps. Vary for speed and power. You can do this whilst walking around.


3

Find an area with a large stairway (football field bleachers work great), then power-walk/run up and down them while taking a break every few runs. Keep doing this until the trip, while increasing the number of "laps" when you think you're improving. When it starts becoming easier, pack up your backpack with your gear or simulate the weight with something ...


3

To deal with low oxygen environments you need more red blood cells. To get more red blood cells you have very few options. Blood doping Low pressure chamber treatments Actually going into higher altitudes on a regular basis (I recommend this one) Make sure your diet has enough iron to support the red blood cell production. However, iron by itself is ...


3

I would recommend an American Alpine Institute mountaineering course. For a mountain like Elbrus, you are probably most interested in their 3-Day Glacier Skills and Crevasse Rescue course, but the Alpinism Intro and Baker Skills and Climbs might also be appropriate. AAI guides are top-notch, and although I have not personally taken this course a friend of ...


3

As Ben Crowell already noted you are not going to be taxing a rope very much in this application, and unless you are planning acrobatic moves off of these holds (which you very well may be) there is little danger even if the rope (or cord) fails. Unless you happen to get a very good deal even 6mm accessory cord, the real UIAA certified stuff, is quite ...


3

You're framing this as a question of "how much will this hurt my climbing"? I wonder if you could use this down time from actual climbing as a chance to focus more on pure climbing specific strength training, and possibly come out of the whole process a stronger climber. Something I tend to do is all but quit route climbing in the winter, and take it up ...


3

I guess to understand the use of a campus board it's the easiest to have a look at it's genesis: The campus board was invented by Wolfgang Güllich, who was with Action Directe the first to climb the grade 9a. He invented the campus board while training for this ascent. The crux of Action Directe is a dyno into a shallow hole that has to be held with the ...


2

There's one exercise where I can't remember the name but let's call it climbing marathon. It is best done in a gym at the end of your climbing session when you are already somewhat pumped. Search for a sector in your gym that is vertical with routes where you know that you can climb them without really thinking about it and where you wouldn't need any funky ...


2

I think it is difficult to give an exact correlation between running time and hiking endurance, but distance running as a fitness regimen is excellent training. It sounds like you have a pretty good idea of what you are in for so I would advise that if you run a couple days during the week and hike when you can, you should do fine. If you can get an extra ...


2

I have heard that RMI (one of the places you listed) is great as well as Alpine Assents, but neither are very formal in the guide education area. Try taking a look at National Outdoor Leadership School. They have a pretty well setup program and work with some schools to get you credit (if you need it) They are pretty thorough and offer a 17 day course and a ...


2

I was lucky enough to take both dinghy sailing lessons and later cruiser sailing lessons. It's an approach I'd really recommend. Sailing a dinghy will teach you to watch the sails and the wind much more easily than in a cruiser. All the skills you learn in a dinghy will apply to a cruiser (except capsize drill, hopefully). They are also a lot of fun, and ...


2

This is to prevent "flappers". A flapper (or avulsions) is when the skin has thickened in a particular area of the fingers, normally the tips, due to abrasion. The problem is the surrounding skin has not thickend. This means that when you apply pressure to the thickened section it can peel away, ripping the weaker surrounding skin. Callouses can be ...


1

If you ever have climbed some days in granite and tried to hold a hot coffee mug afterwards, you will know that sanding away your skin isn't a great idea especially to improve your climbing performance. But there may be two cases where sanding could be useful: Shortening finger nails, as sanding them is less prone to damage the nail than clipping ...


1

From the sounds of it, to develop all the skills you are interested in, you are not going to learn them all with a single class. Additionally, it will likely take several years to hone your skills to a point that you can depend on them. For learning how to harness the wind, it is better to learn on a smaller boat. Something like a sunfish, laser, or a Hobie ...


1

If you have the option, small boats give you the best feel for how sails work and how changes in trim affect the boat and your course, so at least start on a small boat. Also, taking a few full days will help far more than a bunch of evenings. You develop a feel for sailing over time so for your initial training, intensive is a good thing. Growing up in ...



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