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11

Have you ever done any weight training? This kind of "delayed onset muscle soreness" is very common for people beginning a weight training program. This wikipedia page attempts to explain the mechanism. For weight training, the general advice is to not stop lifting, but to reduce the weight and intensity. If you google "delay onset muscle soreness" ...


9

This will a bit of a more general answer because I don't run 10k but... Peak fitness is something you aim to hit at a certain point in time and is not something that can be maintained for a great period of time. Expecting to perform your best every time will likely lead you to be disappointed. That's not to say you're not capable of running 10k faster than ...


8

You'd be better of strength training your muscles to carry the extra weight of the water you need to carry. How much water an individual needs to stay hydrated is not a standard measure. Different individuals need more or less water to keep their bodies properly hydrated. I don't think it's necessarily wise to try and train your body to do with less of ...


7

I assume you're talking about the south base camp in Nepal, which is the more popular destination. The typical route gains about 8000 feet over 40+ miles, which is really quite gentle, although the net effect of all that altitude is significant. It's mostly class 1 with some class 2 (rough trail/scrambling), so no technical skills required. ...


7

All these are well and good, but "No training plan survives contact with real life". Doing something vaguely aerobic that you enjoy doing for several hours at a stretch one or two times a week is far better than the "optimal" aerobic exercise that you never do. The best training for long days in the mountains is long days in the mountains. If you can't ...


6

I have to disagree with the above answer about rotator cuff problems. It is a good idea to strengthen your rotator cuffs for various reasons, but to me this does just sound like Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. Any type of high intensity exercise where you put strain on your muscles is likely to cause the same thing. I get delayed soreness (which always seems ...


5

I can offer some basic advice on two of your points but I've never experienced the injury nor do I know a great deal about it unfortunately. Do most good climbers hold back the dropped fingers as in the penultimate image, or do they flex them down as in the last one? You should attempt to keep the fingers not being trained, loose (not crimped and ...


5

Sit-ups won't work, archery is all about the shoulders, not abs. Also it's a bad idea to dry aim a bow, it is generally frowned upon. There are exercise tools you can buy such as a bow training exerciser: Another option is a training band, such as this: Failing that you can get yourself a press exerciser, I have one and it is very useful: ...


5

While Patrick's answer here clears many of the points, I would like to make up a few points about warm-up routines and acclimatization. A few points may sound very specific to you and not really generic at all. For us, Indians, that weather is not really what you can call normal and pleasant, with the gradual (if it is) gain in altitude adding to a wee bit ...


5

If you can only run 2x a week and only have limited time, then running 10k as fast as you can is a reasonable training plan. However, you will rapidly reach a plateaux and see no improvement in results. The long slow runs need to be for times and distances that are generally 2-3x the length of your event. ( At least for events less than an hour. ) Serious ...


5

I'm not an expert, however I can give you general direction. The reason why you want run slower to run faster is for one: less risk of injury and second: training to stay in aerobic zone, avoiding going to anaerobic zone and build endurance in the end. When you exercise, first you are well rested and your body receives enough oxygen. This means all ...


5

In short: Build up your base endurance! This will give you the ability to perform at moderate intensity over several hours and to recover quickly after the tour. This means, try to get many low-intensity but long training sessions. For your cardiovascular system it doesn't matter in the first place whether you do this by bike, running or hiking, just keep ...


5

Instead of running or walking, I recommend you go to the gym and do the Stairmaster. This will provide an aerobic workout while building the muscles you need for hiking and scrambling. This is what I do to get in shape for backpacking trips. Edit 3/5/2015: Providing an answer to anatols questions in the comments: I use the Stairmaster 4-5 times a week, 30 ...


4

It's all about grouping. When you're setting the sights on your bow, where you hit a target is less important than what the size of your grouping is while you're practice shooting. If you're missing the centre, but your grouping is tight, then you at least know that your shot is consistent, and that it's your sights which need to be adjusted, and not the ...


4

http://www.bow-international.com/features/traditional/ask-the-experts-starting-instinctive/ The cup gives you a 3D target to help you focus during instinct training. A flat piece of paper just doesn't excite the subconscious as much as a physical object does.


4

Before I started to trad climb, I was using mobile protection in an alpine environment. As a consequence, I never fell into a piece of gear and belays (that were not bolted) were save by location, often by slinging some big rock. This is the extreme case, but also when starting to trad climb the same happened: I didn't have much experience so I wasn't sure ...


4

Learning how to place gear is a lot different than actually using it. Trad climbers place their pro, but hope they never have to fall on it. They give it a few tugs, maybe weight it to make sure it'll hold, but for the most part it's there just in case of a fall. Aid climbers on the other hand, they use every piece of gear that they place, they get real ...


3

A personal anecdote. Two fairly unfit blokes go to the Alps and spend a week on long but easy training climbs. Then they are joined by two athlete friends who are in hard marathon training. The two fairly unfit blokes who have trained in the Alps proceed to walk the runners into the ground for the next few days till their friends build up their Alpine ...


3

That sounds like a rotator cuff problem to me. It's a common problem that I see amongst my climbing friends and I experience myself. Usual symptoms are soreness in the elbow join/lower bicep, sometimes causing carpal tunnel pain, sometimes causing more extreme shoulder pain, sometimes even limiting movement. My understanding is that we overuse the big ...


2

Typically for training for this kind of thing you want to work on two aspects of your fitness, strength (to carry the weight you need for the periods you need without pain/injury) and cardio vascular performance (you want to have the lungs and heart to process as much energy as you can as fast as you can and recover quickly when resting to allow you to ...


2

Important disclaimer: I am not a medical doctor, all of the following is based on knowledge acquired from climbing courses and experience. Therefore I will keep it general, but take anything with a grain of salt (as you should with anything considering your health from unknown sources). Hangboarding and campusing are extremely dangerous to your fingers. As ...


2

Push-ups, sit-ups, dry aiming you bow (do not do this with compound bow, you can derail your strings), one of those stretchy surgical tubing pull exercise gizmos. Yoga is good exercise for all muscle groups and keeps you limber and supple, not bunched up.


2

Use your imagination. If you can't see a small point, imagine one. When I'm sighting up a target, I don't aim for the bulls-eye, I aim for the centre of the bulls-eye. Here's your solid surface: When you put your sights on an animal at a significant distance, you want to aim just behind their leg, mid way through their body-this is where their lungs ...


1

You'll have to use a spotter. Either a separate person or yourself. Basically a person with a telescope to see where you hit. If it is a separate person fire one arrow and they will inform you where you hit and you can adjust your sights accordingly. If you are spotting for yourself it is the same, just more time consuming. You'll have to remember exactly ...


1

Dumbbells How about weight training such as bent-over dumbbell rows and similar exercises? Video examples - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYcpY20QaE8 or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LktGPg-AkvY


1

As most people have recommended Training for the new alpinism is a very comprehensive sports science book on exactly the subject your interested in. It covers much more than a stackexchange answer could expect to. From said book, Aerobic threshold power output is the single most important measure of a person's aerobic system. Why should you care so ...



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