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9

Everyone who climbs suffers from this to some degree, so you need to accept that doing this will make you scared. I've had very similar issues to the one's your describe over the years. I've tried several techniques to help with this with mixed result. From my personal experience the below didn't work for me (they may for you) Fall training, i.e. taking ...


9

As you say, it's only in your head. Here are some things that may work (worked for me with various degrees of success): Just do it more. You say that you climb "almost all indoors" and "have taken a few falls" - I sense a contradiction there. Make a rule that for every route you climb, you fall off at the end. This way you will be doing 10 scary falls ...


9

Here are a few quick and easy ones that will help your strength: Squats will be the most useful. Not exactly at your desk, but you can definitely do it next to your desk. Seated leg raises. Keeping your legs straight, hold the side of the chair and raise and lower your legs Calf raises. Put your weight on your toes and lift yourself up. You don't need to ...


8

An adult person burns between 100 to 150 kcal additionally per 100m elevation gained. Moreover, if you carried some common back bag you should add around 50 to 100 calories per hour. If the bag was very heavy you should add around 200 calories per hour. Of course, these are only average values - for a more exact calculation we would need the weight, age of ...


8

Rather than try to answer the personal part of your question, which as Liam said needs a doctor's attention to answer properly, I shall reply to the more general title: Can a Finger Pulley injury be predicted / anticipated? In an absolute sense I do not believe it can be. In a relative sense it is caused high stress on these "pulleys" so avoiding hard use ...


7

I've found a great way to work through this is doing intentional fall progressions. Since you are climbing mostly indoors this is easy to do frequently. Make sure you have a solid and patient belayer while doing this. Start with leading up to a bolt (4th or higher is best) and take a short lead fall from there. Since being at the bolt doesn't make you as ...


7

I can't speak for the Scottish winter and there definitely are differences to the Alps. But still I can give you an overview what is important to learn if you are going to do alpine summer tours in the Alps. The German Alpine Club (German: Deutscher Alpenverein, DAV) is the world's largest climbing association. The number of members is over one million. ...


7

Rest! I know you're going to want to climb every second of every day but you must give your ligaments time to heal! Muscle takes two days to repair however ligaments can take 1 -2 weeks. Gradually increase your time climbing, this will greatly reduce the chance of injury. Familiarize yourself with all the necessary safety requirements, do you know what a ...


6

I guess to understand the use of a campus board it's the easiest to have a look at it's genesis: The campus board was invented by Wolfgang Güllich, who was with Action Directe the first to climb the grade 9a. He invented the campus board while training for this ascent. The crux of Action Directe is a dyno into a shallow hole that has to be held with the ...


6

In general you can't do that much in two weeks, regardless being 20 or 80 years old. It depends on your general fitness level and your life habits. If you usually are a healthy living (wo)man, being active, eating balanced, no-drinker, no-smoker and so on, it will be easier to get a proper endurance level. On the other side I don't think you can achieve a ...


5

This isn't a complete answer, just an answer about the avalanche stuff, but it's too long to fit in a comment. Research shows that most avalanche training actually is not helpful in reducing people's chances of getting killed. It may even produce a negative effect on safety, because people get a false sense of competence. This is called the "expert halo." ...


5

As the comments have mentioned, grades vary somewhat between gyms, but I think you can still provide some rough guidelines. Peg boards can probably be done by anyone at any climbing level. You're not stressing your fingers really, so there's little chance of injury. It's essentially like practicing pull-ups. It probably won't help your climbing too much ...


5

In my opinion there are a couple valid reasons to use sand paper. File down current calluses, therefore avoiding large calluses from getting snagged/pinching itself resulting in a flapper(ripped piece of skin only attached at a small point). Toughen up the skin, resulting in less sensitive and more durable skin. When you are a beginner it will take time ...


5

Is it possible to compare stats from this to what is required to be able to do this hike? VO2 max is the best indicator of fitness. Running will increase your VO2 max. VO2 max is the amount of Oxygen your blood can hold per Kg per minute. This is an important factor in all endurance exercise, especially exercise at altitude. The higher your VO2 max ...


5

I don't think it is difficult to give an exact correlation between running time and hiking endurance. I think this is impossible. I will give you an example from myself: I am not a good runner because my lungs aren't the best. Nonetheless I can hike quite a lot and had no problems at 12.500 ft. Also 6000 ft a single day up/down were possible. Still I am ...


5

Moving up a 1 cm wide campus board one hand at a time is on par with the intensity of V4/V5 boulder moves, approximately. So unless you're very comfortable bouldering in this range, it's not suggested because you will probably injure yourself. If you are past this phase, then campusing is a very good training tool for increasing strength and power in a very ...


5

I'm not 74, but I'm closer to it than to 24. If you can walk for an hour easily, you can probably walk for 10 hours easily. That's basically how humans are built - we can walk the entire time we are awake (unlike our ancient prey, who literally cannot do that.) Some people can't walk for an hour, but I really don't know of people who can walk for 5 hours but ...


4

Those values seem to be over-exaggerated. I was once measured by the professional equipment (from the local university) and my callory usage was 5000-6000 kcal a day, with average 20 km hike and 1000 meters elevation. This included the normal metabolism per day (about 2000-2500 kcal) + increased metabolism because of cold temperatures in night. The measures ...


4

Any 8-10 mm nylon rope will hold many, many times more than your body weight. Climbing ropes are designed to hold dynamic falls, not just static body weight. You could easily get away with 6 mm accessory cord, which is a lot cheaper than a climbing rope. It holds about 700 kg.


4

If I interpret your question correctly, your problem is not so much about the climbing itself but more about the strategy, i.e. to identify where to rope up and where to remove the rope again. As you say, this can cost you lots of time if you recognize those points too late. This isn't something that you can train by climbing but more a thing that should be ...


3

There a so many things to consider when you calculate one such thing, and it would again involve a lot of data, equations and that too with subtle variations in data. For an example, there are people walking at different speeds, there would be differences, especially between walking and running. You know, with trekking/hiking, its practically hard to draw ...


3

Interesting. All of the answers address winter mountaineering, which I would regard as a separate subject. Winter skills for someone like me, living 4 hours from the mountains, would primarily be about how to prepare and cope with winter conditions, such as encountered by a hunter or hiker below timberline. Skills I would see as important: Hypothermia. ...


3

As Ben Crowell already noted you are not going to be taxing a rope very much in this application, and unless you are planning acrobatic moves off of these holds (which you very well may be) there is little danger even if the rope (or cord) fails. Unless you happen to get a very good deal even 6mm accessory cord, the real UIAA certified stuff, is quite ...


2

There's one exercise where I can't remember the name but let's call it climbing marathon. It is best done in a gym at the end of your climbing session when you are already somewhat pumped. Search for a sector in your gym that is vertical with routes where you know that you can climb them without really thinking about it and where you wouldn't need any funky ...


2

I think it is difficult to give an exact correlation between running time and hiking endurance, but distance running as a fitness regimen is excellent training. It sounds like you have a pretty good idea of what you are in for so I would advise that if you run a couple days during the week and hike when you can, you should do fine. If you can get an extra ...


2

This is to prevent "flappers". A flapper (or avulsions) is when the skin has thickened in a particular area of the fingers, normally the tips, due to abrasion. The problem is the surrounding skin has not thickend. This means that when you apply pressure to the thickened section it can peel away, ripping the weaker surrounding skin. Callouses can be ...


1

If you ever have climbed some days in granite and tried to hold a hot coffee mug afterwards, you will know that sanding away your skin isn't a great idea especially to improve your climbing performance. But there may be two cases where sanding could be useful: Shortening finger nails, as sanding them is less prone to damage the nail than clipping ...



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