Hot answers tagged

19

What you're asking to do is impossible to accomplish. The signs will never, "move outward with the tree as it grows". Trees don't grow like that. The reason trees have rings is because they grow layer-by-layer each season. If you tie a thread around a tree, the tree will not grow and break the thread, it will grow around it. Similarly, you're not going to ...


15

I think the Audubon Field Guides smartphone apps are fantastic. At least, they are a great improvement over the printed guides -- more species, more photos, lengthier descriptions, and smaller than the book. The apps help make identification relatively easy because you can search for trees in your region and leaf shape, for example, and get a smaller set of ...


13

It looks like a Burl. They are natural non-harmful (think of them like scar tissue maybe, resulting from injury or infection) deformities in the grain of trees. Both hardwood & softwood trees can develop burls. (FWIW, I'd guess based on the bark & needles laying in the folds of the bark in the first picture that this tree is some sort of conifer.)


10

There are two important factors when bowmaking: Flexibiliy, i.e. how easy the wood is to bend Strength, i.e. how much force you can put into the wood before it breaks. If you are just interested in a toy bow that doesn't shoot to hard or far then flexibility is your main concern. You want thinnish green wood which tends to be the most flexible. If you ...


10

Yes, some sources create toxic smoke/fumes, notably: Oleander Rhododendron Poison Ivy (smoke can cause lung damage in some cases) I'm not sure of a comprehensive list, but be wary of any poisonous wood / shrub, it's probably more likely to burn toxic. As pointed out in the comment, unless you can identify vines well then it may be a good idea to stay ...


9

Tree's generate water as part of the respiration process (not to be confused with photosynthesis which is different). This happens at night and day. This is relatively static day or night. Photosynthesis alters dependant on sunlight, respiration (being the process of producing energy) does not. Respiration will alter dependant on the time of year, i.e. ...


9

Interesting question! Here is an article describing the techniques used by arborists. The article describes a number of different techniques and different pieces of gear. I'll describe one specific method, using cheap gear, that is based on techniques that I've used in rock climbing. Buy: a short length (maybe 20 m) of 9-10 mm static climbing rope a small ...


9

Moss grows best in the shade (and damp, but most relevant here is shade). Because of the curvature of the Earth, in the northern hemisphere the north side of trees is shadier than the south side, so if moss grows on only one side of a tree, it is likely to be the north side. In the southern hemisphere, the whole thing is mirrored so the moss is on the south ...


9

This usually means that they had a nest in the tree. If they are still there after a few days it probably means they also had young. Either still in the nest or young enough that they still returned to be fed.


9

Was it safe? Yes, you were not in any danger here (unless your tree was a Charlie Brown Christmas tree). Was it the best thing to do? No, for a couple of reasons, the most important being that it does not comply with leave not trace ethics, and can badly scar the tree. It's also no good for your rope, dragging your rope through dirt and sap can ...


8

Sugar maples, like other maples, flower in early spring. The flowers aren't very impressive. The leaves of sugar maple are usually fully expanded three to four weeks after the leaf buds begin to swell in the spring. The flowers emerge soon after the leaves and are in full bloom within a week. ...Fruits that result from flower pollination usually mature ...


8

I know that on the east coast, a couple of the park services have been pushing the climbing community to install bolt anchors as a replacement for nests of old slings around trees. This is in part because slinging anchors around trees can damage the bark, and sometimes eventually kill the tree. This shift from webbing anchors around trees to bolted rappel ...


8

Coming from a heavy ranching area the method used for properly attaching fences to trees is to add a board in between. The board provides enough surface area and strength that instead of the tree growing around the nail it pushes it out .


8

Sap flow in trees is a result of sap pressure accumulated in the roots during a frost, which is then released when the temperature thaws during the day. Many tree species cannot be harvested because they do not develop high enough sap pressure to bleed (according to Venerable Trees, Inc.). One farm in BC reports that birch sap is harvested just after maple: ...


7

Given that trees don't push outward, one option is to use lag bolts, and once a year two go around and turn them out a little bit so they are never engulfed in the growth. The amount of turning you'll need to do and the frequency will depend on the speed of growth and how secure you need the sign. If you can leave a half-inch out of the tree and have the ...


6

You may like the look, but those trees are in the process of being killed by a nasty invasive, Oriental Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus). It is one of the more common invasives in MA. There have been many things writting about this invasive. It's been on any list of invasive plants in MA that I've seen. Do a search and you'll see. DCR (MA Department ...


6

In the US southwest, Juniper was commonly used by native peoples. I've heard it said that one can still find living Juniper trees around the southwest that have apparent 'slices' taken out of them where material was removed to shape a bow. Also, a quick google search turned up this site with a seemingly comprehensive list of woods that will work for bow ...


6

When I was a kid I repeatedly made simple bows from hazel trees/shrubs. The main advantage here is that it grows in very handy, more or less uniformly thick branches that are very appropriate in size to use as bows (also make good walking sticks/spears). As strength/durability of the bow was never an issue we used freshly cut, green branches - obviously a ...


6

Many pine woods will leave your food tasting of turpentine. Depending on the wood, it won't be enough to be toxic, but will still (imo) be a very unpleasant flavor. Generally, due to my experience (in the southeast) this has developed into "don't use evergreens." Avoid woods with much rot. Avoid wood with mosses, fungus, etc. Burn larger diameter wood ...


5

I think it was polypropylene, it was that cheap, hard, twisted stuff sold in hardware stores for general utility You may find a larger hardware store sells a wider quality spectrum of plastic-based ropes. Your best bet will be to browse stores until you find something that seems well-made, at a price you're willing to pay. Hemp rope is an old classic, ...


5

I lived in Yosemite for over a year and saw TONS of tree belay stations. Most of them were there to stay with a number of slings and belay rings attached "for good". Yosemite had a number of bolts getting chopped by other climbers for using power drills rather than hand drills, so the ethics as far as acceptance in using trees was not a problem, or I would ...


5

I think if you're seeing damage your concern is valid. I do recall reading that soil compaction is the bigger problem and different rigging won't help that. You could use a "friction saver" as shown in the following video, saving both the tree and your rope from wear. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8lXy1hn1UU


4

You do not say what size tree, but to me big means something like 1/2 meter or more diameter trunk. Presuming a living tree with no obvious movement of the roots the tree was infinitely stronger than your quick draw or chains or bolts holding them to the rocks. "Was it safe" is not the right question "was it safer than what I already accepted as safe enough" ...


4

There's no safe wood I've found that's made food taste really bad - generally if it does taste absolutely foul I'd be wary that something else was up. In the grand scheme of things though, it depends what you class as "bad". Different people prefer different flavours, and in that sense using different types of wood can definitely make foods taste different. ...


3

The right answer will depend vastly on how fast the trees grow. For example Aspen trees grow extremely fast in certain climates while subalpine fir are pretty slow growing in almost every case. Fortunately, there is an extremely easy way for you to find out the growth rate of your trees. Cut one down, count 10 years worth of rings and measure the distance ...


3

Short answer: If the tree is a living and thick one, then it was OK. That being said, there are several reasons you should had done a proper anchor with multiple points (trees, in this case) and equalized, and then walked back again to the top. One simple drawback of your approach is, that the friction between the rope and the tree trunk, when you recall ...


2

I was pleased to see the photos of the burls; it's been some time since I had thought of all of the splendid uses Native Americans and others had found for burls, so I hope no-one minds my digression. Burls are caused by wounds to trees, as has been mentioned. But far from making the tree unattractive, burls had been valued! They had been sought out by ...


2

Expand Farm Products sells the insulator to attach signs to trees using a rubber rope to allow the tree to keep growing. They just started marketing the sign hold tape along with their insulator to post any of your signs to trees quickly and easily. www.expandfarmproducts.com or on facebook at Expand Farm Products Llc.


2

Moss prefers damp locations irrespective of facing. You need to cut out a few variables before you can use moss as a pretty reliable method to determine North: Ignore moss on the ground. The ground is usually damp due to water evaporating. Ignore moss that's growing on an incline. An incline slows water run off so the area stays damper for longer. Ignore ...


2

Agreed. The Audubon guides are the best that I know of because you can search in the flower section, the bark section, or the leaf section for your target tree. Not familiar with the apps, but I'm sure they do the same thing if not more. My personal favorite for tree walks with kids? The Sibley Guide to Trees. Here's why: Really good color drawings ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible